Winged Victory (statue)

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Winged Victory
Winged Victory (Olympia, United States).jpg
Winged Victory pictured in 2017
Winged Victory (statue) is located in Washington (state)
Winged Victory (statue)
Location in Washington (state)
Coordinates 47°02′11″N 122°54′12″W / 47.036450°N 122.903299°W / 47.036450; -122.903299
Location Olympia, Washington, United States
Designer Alonzo Victor Lewis
Type statue
Material bronze on a granite base
Completion date 1938
Dedicated to World War I casualties from Washington state

Winged Victory is a World War I memorial statue in Olympia, Washington, United States. It is located in front of the Insurance Building and adjacent to the Washington State Capitol. Completed in 1938 by Alonzo Victor Lewis, it is dedicated to military personnel from Washington state who died in World War I.

History

Winged Victory pictured in 1938

In 1919, Washington Governor Ernest Lister called for the erection of a monument to the 1,642 citizens of the state who were killed during World War I.[1][2] The Washington State Legislature subsequently appropriated $50,000 for its design and construction, with funds partly raised through the sale of a state forest.[3] The balance of the $100,000 cost of the monument was provided in grants from the United States government.[1][4]

Seattle artist Alonzo Victor Lewis, who already had a popular reputation in the state, was commissioned for the sculpture.[1] His plans for it were approved in 1927 and the statue was completed in 1938.[1] It was formally dedicated in a ceremony held on May 30, 1938, and it was unveiled by the mothers of two Washington soldiers who had been killed in action.[1] Stephen Chadwick, then chairman of the American Legion’s Americanism Committee and later National Commander of the American Legion delivered the ceremonial charge.[5]

Following the completion of Winged Victory, which was Lewis' third World War I memorial statue, he was named the state's Sculptor Laureate.[1][6] Winged Victory has been called "one of the most recognizable structures" on the campus of the Washington State Capitol.[2]

Design

A side view of Winged Victory pictured in 2006, a period during which the statue was painted in a golden hue.

The bronze statue is elevated on a granite base; it features a Winged Victory from Classical mythology standing, with wings displayed, behind a United States soldier, a sailor, a marine, and an American Red Cross nurse, all of whom appear to be marching towards the east.[1] [4] The Winged Victory motif was a popular theme for World War I monuments of the era, though the inclusion of a Red Cross nurse makes the Olympia statue more complex than most.[3] Each of the four sides of the statue's granite base is inscribed.[1] On the east side, which is inlaid with a bronze representation of the Seal of the State of Washington, the inscription reads:

TO THE MEMORY OF THE CITIZENS OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON WHO LOST THEIR LIVES IN THE SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES DURING THE WORLD WAR 1917-1918

On the north side is a Biblical quotation from John 15, verse 13:[7]

GREATER LOVE HATH NO MAN THAN THIS, THAT A MAN LAY DOWN HIS LIFE FOR HIS FRIEND

On the west side:

THEIR SACRIFICE WAS TO VINDICATE THE PRINCIPLES OF PEACE AND JUSTICE IN THE LIFE OF THE WORLD

On the south side:

THEY FOUGHT TO SAFEGUARD AND TRANSMIT TO POSTERITY THE PRINCIPLES OF JUSTICE, FREEDOM, AND DEMOCRACY

In 1988 the sculpture was painted with a coating of brass powder in an acrylic base, giving it a golden hue.[1][8] This layer was removed in 2012 and the statue was restored to its original bronze color.[8]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Winged Victory monument". des.wa.gov. Washington State Department of Enterprise Services. Retrieved September 23, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Hobbs, Andy (April 25, 2017). "100 years later, Washington still feels impact from World War I". The Olympian. Retrieved September 23, 2017. 
  3. ^ a b Nici, John (2015). Famous Works of Art—And How They Got That Way. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 69. ISBN 1442249552. 
  4. ^ a b "100 years ago: U.S. went to war with Germany". Spokesman-Review. April 6, 2017. Retrieved September 23, 2017. 
  5. ^ "Winged Victory Monument". worldwar1centennial.org. United States World War I Centennial Commission. Retrieved September 23, 2017. 
  6. ^ Poyner, Fred (2017). Seattle Public Sculptors: Twelve Makers of Monuments, Memorials and Statuary. McFarland. p. 117. ISBN 1476666504. 
  7. ^ John 15:13, Bible Hub
  8. ^ a b "A cleaner Victory". Spokesman-Review. May 15, 2012. Retrieved September 23, 2017. 
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