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Cardiff

  • Henry Austin Bruce Henry Austin Bruce , first Baron Aberdare (1815-1895), statesman; called to bar at Lincoln's Inn, 1837; stipendiary magistrate for Merthyr Tydvil and Aberdare, 1847-52; liberal M.P. for Merthyr Tydvil, 1852-68; under-secretary of state for home department, 1862-4; privy councillor and vice-president of committee of council on education, 1864; M.P. for Renfrewshire, 1869; home secretary, 1869-73; conducted reform in licensing laws; lord president of council, 1873-4; created Baron Aberdare, 1873; F.R.S., 1876: president of Royal Geographical Society, 1881, and of Royal Historical Society, 1878-92; chairman of National African (afterwards Royal Niger) Company, 1882-95; first president of University College, Cardiff, 1883; first chancellor of university of Wales, 1894; G.O.B., 1885.
  • William Burges (architect) William Burges (1827-1881), architect ; trained by Edward Blore, 1844, and Digby Wyatt, 1849; studied mediaeval architecture on the continent; employed, 1856 onwards, in important buildings and restorations; designed Brisbane Cathedral, 1859, and Cork Cathedral, 1862; restored Cardiff Castle, 1865; wrote architectural papers.
  • Walter Cradock Walter Cradock (1606?-1659), congregational minister; curate at Cardiff and Wrexham: chaplain to Sir Robert Harley of Herefordshire; congregational minister at Llanvaches, Monmouthshire; preacher in London, 1646; published sermons, 1646-51; his works collected, 1800.
  • William Erbury William Erbury (1604-1664), independent divine; B.A. Brasenose College, Oxford, 1623: incumbent of St. Mary's, Cardiff, 1623-38; pronounced a schismatic by the bishop of Llandaff, 1634; forced to resign his living, 1638; chaplain of Skippon's regiment; according to Edwards, taught universal redemption; denied the divinity of Christ, l645; maintained in various theological treatises that the Holy Spirit departed about the end of the apostolic period.
  • Owen Glendower Owen Glendower (13597-1416?) (Owain ab Gruffydd), Welsh rebel ; lord of Glyndwr and Sycharth ; claimed descent from Bleddyn ab Cynvyn and from Llewelyn; studied law at Westminster; served with Richard II against the Scots, 1385; witness in suit of Scrope v. Grosvenor, 1386; as squire to Earl of Arundel served Henry of Lancaster, but hooded Welsh rebellion against him on his accession as Henry IV; assumed title of Prince of Wales his estates granted by Henry IV to John Beaufort, earl of Somerset; invaded South Wales, and harassed the royal army in the north; repulsed before Carnarvon, 1401; negotiated with Northumberland for peace, but at the same time appealed for help to Scotland and the Irish lords; captured Reginald de Grey and Sir Edmund Mortimer at Pilleth,1402; baffled the English army and released Mortimer after marrying him to his daughter, November 1402; his chief residences burnt by Prince Henry, 1403; took Carmarthen, Usk, Caerleon, and Newport, failed to join the Percies at Shrewsbury, 1403; ravaged English border; aided by French and Bretons captured Harlech and Cardiff, 1404; concluded an alliance with France, 1405; recognised Benedict XIII as pope, 1405; summoned a Welsh parliament, 1405; probably formed his alliance with Mortimer and Northumberland, c. 1405; his sons captured by Prince Henry; retook Carmarthen with help of a French force, 1406; again defeated, 1406; deserted by Northumberland: lost Aberystwitb, 1407, and South Wales, 1408; his wife and relations captured, 1413; admitted to the king's grace and obedience, 1415: his end unknown.
  • Francis Gwyn Francis Gwyn (1648 ?-1734), politician ; friend of Rochester; M.P., Chippenham, 1673-9, Cardiff, 1685, Ohristchurch, 1689-95, Oallington, 1695-8, Totnes, 16991701 and 1710-15, Wells, 1673-1727; under-secretary of state, 1681-3 and 1688-9; privy councillor, 1701; Irish secretary, 1701; commissioner of trade, 1711-13; secretaryat-war, 1713-14; his diary of James II's expedition to the west (1688) printed, 1886.
  • Philip Jones of Fonmon Philip Jones (1618?-1674), Welsh parliamentarian governor of Swansea, 1645, and colonel, 1646; with Colonel Horton defeated the royalists at St. Pagans, 1648; gov.-riior of Cardiff; M.P., Brecknockshire, 1650, Glamonanshire, 1656; one of Cromwell's peers, 1657; member of the council of state from 1653; controller of the household to Oliver and Kidmnl Cromwell; acquired large fortune: rlmrired with conniption by the military party mid extreme republicans; governor of the Charterhouse, 1868; made his peace with the king and was sheriff of Glamorgan, 1671; purchased Foumon Castle, 1664.
  • William Rowlands William Rowlands (1802-1865), known as Gwilym Leyn, Welsh bibliographer; weaver in Carnarvonshire: joined Wesleyans, c. 1820; acted as lay-preacher, and (1831-64) served many chapels in Cardiff circuit: settled at Oswestry, 1864: published religious ork-. anl a bibliographical record of books printed in and relating to Wales from 1546 to 1800.
  • Algernon Sidney Algernon Sidney or Sydney (1622-1683), republican; accompanied his father, Robert Sidney, second earl of Leicester, to Denmark and Paris; served under his brother, Lord Lisle, against the Irish rebels, 1642; took up arms against Charles I, and was wounded at Marston Moor, 1644; governor of Colchester, 1645; M.P., Cardiff, 1646; lieutenant general of horse in Ireland, 1647; appointed governor of Dublin, but immediately superseded; governor of Dover, 1648-50; nominated commissioner for trial of Charles I, but opposed constitution and proceedings of high court as invalid, as well as the subsequent engagement approving them; member of council of state, 1653; held aloof from the protectorate after dissolution of the Rump; again member of council of state, 1659; chief of four commissioners who mediated between Sweden and Denmark at Elsinore, 1659-60. Refusing to give pledges to Charles II, he remained abroad; at Rome, 1660-3: his attempt* to obtain foreign military employment frustrated by English influence: his life attempted at Augsburg: went to Holland, 1665: Afterwards lived in France; negotiated with Louis XIV, with the view of raising a revolt in England, 1666; came to England on private business, 1677, and remained: unable to obtain a seat in parliament, but exercised much inflnenoe; vindicated himself in interview with Charles II from charge of complicity in nonconformist plot; intimate with republicans, but quarrelled with Shaftesbury: received money from French ambassador and co-operated with him on foreign questions, but ridiculed his pretenMM to direct opposition: said to have drafted answer to (mil's reasons for dissolving Oxford parliament; discussed question of insurrection with whig leaders, January l3; sent to Tower of Iondon after discovery of Rye House plot (June); tried before Jeffreys on three overt vuargw of treason (November): defended himself ably, but convicted: drew np petitions setting forth illegality of bis trial and for commutation of sentence; executed on Tower Hill (December): his body buried at Penshurst; his vindication allowed to be published by government; hisDiscourses concerning Government(answer to Filmer) first printed, 1698, an edition containing letters and report of trial being issued, 1763, further revised and added to, 1773.
  • Charles Alan Smythies Charles Alan Smythies (1844-1894), bishop of Zniizitwr: born In London; educated at Felsted, Trinity Oolleoe. Cambridge (B.A., 1866), and Cuddeedon; became vicarof Roath, near Cardiff, 1880; sailed for Zanzibar as Mcond bishop of universities mission in Central Africa, in succession to Bishop Edward Steere, 1884; worked with the jrreateat energy at organising the mission and training native teachers, travelling thousands of miles on foot; raised 11,000* in England for a suffragan bishop for Nyasa district, 1890; succumbed to malarial fever, May 1894, and was buried at sea between Zanzibar and Aden.
  • John Patrick Crichton Stuart John Patrick Crichton Stuart -, third Marquis of Bute (1847-1900), son of John Stuart, second marquis of Bute (rf. 1848), and great-great-grandson of John Stuart, third earl of Bute; of Harrow and Christ Church, Oxford; abandoned presbyteriau church for that of Rome, 1868, an incident which probably suggested the plot of Disraeli's novelLothair(1870); inherited large estates in Scotland and in neighbourhood of Cardiff; mayor of Cardiff, 1890; president of University College, Cardiff; active member of Scottish universities commission, 1889; rector of St. Andrews, 1892-8; provost of Rothesay, 1896-9; lord-lieutenant of county of Bute, 1892; K.T., 1875. His works include an English translation of the Breviary 1879, with numerous historic-ill and critical notes, several translations of the orders of service for the greater church festivals, The Language of the Natives of Teneriffe 1891, and The Arms of the Royal and Parliamentary Burghs 1897, with Mr. J. R. N. Macphail and Mr. H. W. Lonsdale. He was a munificent benefactor of St. Andrews and Glasgow universities.

Coventry

  • George Abbot (archbishop) George Abbot (1562-1633), archbishop of Canterbury; born at Guildford, and educated at the free grammar school; B. A., Balliol College, Oxford, 1582; probationer-fellow, 1583; M.A., and took holy orders, 1585; during the eight succeeding years studied theology, did tutorial work, and as a vehement supporter of the puritans won great academical fame for his preaching; appointed private chaplain to Thomas Sackville, lord Buckhurst, chancellor of the university, 1592; B.D., 1593; D.D. and master of University College, 1597; dean of Winchester, 1600; vice-chancellor of the university, 1600, 1603, and 1605; came into conflict, in 1603, with Laud, then proctor of the university, who asserted the perpetual visibility of the church of Christ in the papacy before the Reformation; began, 1604, with seven other Oxford graduates, revision of the four gospels, Acts, and Apocalypse, for Authorised Version; became chaplain to the Earl of Dunbar and visited Scotland to aid in re-establishing episcopacy there, 1608; bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, 1609; translated to bishopric of London, 1610; archbishop of Canterbury, 1611; largely responsible for marriage of Princess Elizabeth with Elector Palatine of Germany, 1613; opposed the divorce of the Countess of Essex, 1613; introduced at court George Villiers, 1615; attacked the scheme for marriage between Prince Charles and the Infanta of Spain, 1617-1622; opposed the king'sdeclaration of sportspermitting Sunday amusements, 1618; endowed a hospital erected at his expense at Guildford, 1619; accidentally shot a keeper while hunting in Bramsliill Park, Hampshire, and was formally pardoned by the king, 1621; reluctantly consented to the Spanish marriage, 1623; opposed Charles I's arbitrary government and was ordered to withdraw to Canterbury, his archiepiscopal authority being given to a commission of five bishops, 1627; restored to favour, 1628, but thenceforth lived chiefly in retirement; died at Croydon. Wrote religious works, principally controversial.
  • John Arnway John Arnway (1601-1653), royalist divine; rector of Hodnet and Ightfleld, 1635; archdeacon of Lichfield and Coventry and prebendary of Woolvey; exiled during protectorate; died in Virginia.
  • John Arundell John Arundell , of Lanherne (d. 1504), divine; M.A. Exeter College, Oxford; dean of Exeter, 1483-96; bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, 1496, and Exeter, 1502.
  • John Ball (priest) John Ball (d, 1381), priest; probably attached to abbey of St. Mary's, York; frequently reprimanded and imprisoned for preaching at Colchester doctrines which were in great part those of Wycliffe, and which in 1381 brought about Tyler's rebellion; released by rebels from the archbishop's prison, Maids tone, where he was confined; captured at Coventry; executed at St. Albans.
  • Isaac Basire Isaac Basire (1607-1676), divine and traveller; studied at Rotterdam, 1623, and at Leyden, 1625; settled in England, 1628; became chaplain to Morton, then bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, 1629; B.D. Cambridge; by royal mandate university preacher through England and Ireland, and rector of Egglescliff, 1636; D.D., 1640; chaplain extraordinary to Charles 1, 1641; collated to stall in Durham Cathedral, 1643: archdeacon of Northumberland, 1644; received living of Stanhope, 1645: seized by parliamentarians and compelled to go abroad, 1646; arrived in 1649 at Rome, whence he set out to the East to disseminate the Anglo-catholic faith; returned to England after successful missionary work, 1661, and was restored to his former offices; among his works are aHistory of the English and Scottish Presbytery 1659, and a life of Cosin, bishop of Durham; he also left in manuscript notes of several of his journeys.
  • Richard Baxter Richard Baxter (1615-1691), presbyterian divine; taught by Richard Wickstead, chaplain to council at Ludlow; after brief experience of court-life, studied for ministry at Wroxeter; was ordained and became head-master of a school at Dudley, 1638; assistant minister at Bridgnorth, Shropshire; lecturer at Kidderminster, 1641; sided with parliament and recommended theprotestation 1642: retired to Gloucester and thence to Coventry, where he officiated as chaplain to garrison: chaplain to Colonel Whalley's regiment after 1645, and present at several sieges; returned to Kidderminster after living in retirement, where he wrote Aphorisms of Justification(1649) and theSaint's Everlasting Rest (1650); came to London, 1660: one of the king's chaplains; prepared the Reformed Liturgy * for Savoy conference; retired from church of England on passing of Act of Uniformity: suffered much ill-treatment under Charles II and Jaines II: imprisoned, 1685-6, and fined by Judge Jeffreys on charge of libelling the church in his 'Paraphrase of New Testament (1685); complied with Toleration Act. His numerous writings include Reliquiae Baxteriana? an autobiography.
  • Ralph Baynes Ralph Baynes (d. 1569), bishop ; M.A. St. John's College, Cambridge, 1521; university preacher; opposed Latimer: professor of Hebrew at Paris; bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, 1554; D.D., 1555; deprived of bishopric, 1559; published a Hebrew grammar.
  • John Becon John Becon (l. 1687), divine ; M.A. St. John's College, Cambridge, 1564; university orator, 1571-3: proctor, 1671-2; canon (1574) and chancellor (1575) of Norwich; LL.D., 1576; precentor of Chichester, 1579; prebendary of Lichfield, 1581; joint-chancellor of Lichfield and Coventry, 1582.
  • Michael Belet Michael Belet ( fl. 1238), judge : son of Michael : Belet (?. 1182): incumbent of Hinclesham, 1201, and Setburgham (now Serbergham), 1204: receiver of rents of see of Coventry, 1223: founded priory at Wroxton for Augustinian canons regular, r. 1230.
  • Thomas Bentham Thomas Bentham (1513-1578), bishop; perpetual fellow, Magdalen College, Oxford, 1546; M.A., 1547; ejected from fellowship, 1553; bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, 1659; D.D., 1565; translated Ezekiel and Daniel (1568) in the BishopsBible.
  • Geoffrey Blythe Geoffrey Blythe (d. 1530), bishop of Lichfleld and Coventry; educated at Eton and King's College, Cambridge; prebendary of York, and archdeacon of Cleveland, 1493; treasurer of church of Sarum, 1494; prebendary of St. Paul's, c. 1496: dean of York, 1496; master of King's Hall, 1499-1528; prebendary and archdeacon of Sarum, 1499; bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, 1503; LL.D.; lord-president of Wales, 1512-1524.
  • William Booth William Booth or Bothe (1390?-1464), archbishop of York; half-brother of Lawrence Booth; studied at Gray's Inn and Pembroke Hall, Cambridge; prebendary of Southwell, 1416: sub-dean of St. Paul's Cathedral, c. 1420, and chancellor, 1421; prebendary of Lincoln, 1420, and of St. Paul's, 1421; bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, 1447; archbishop of York, 1452.
  • Charles Bray Charles Bray (1811-1884), philosophical writer ; ribbon manufacturer at Coventry, 1835 till 1856; engaged in numerous enterprises for amelioration of condition of working classes; published philosophical writings, based chiefly on phrenology and the docrine of necessity.
  • John Bryan (nonconformist) John Bryan (d. 1676), nonconformist: educated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge; vicar of Holy Trinity, Coventry, 1644; ejected, 1662; continued to preach and to educate nonconformists; D.D.; founded presbyterian congregation in Coventry, 1672; published sermons and poems.
  • William Henry Lytton Earle Bulwer William Henry Lytton Earle Bulwer , Baron Dalling and Bulwer (1801-1872), diplomatist, better known as Sir Henry Bulwer; educated at Harrow and at Trinity and Downing colleges, Cambr published poems, 1822; in Om-w, acting for the revolutionary committee, 1824; army officer, 1825-9; attache at Berlin, 1827, Vienna, 1829, and the Hayue, 1H30; in during the revolution, 1830: M.P. for Wilton, 183U, for Coventry, 1831, and for Murylebone, 135; chaivc V~lr;IH; d'alTain-- nt I;I-U-"M-IS, 1835; secretary of embassy at Constantinople, 1H37; charge d'affaires at 1'uris, ln:9; iimbiKsa-lor at.Ma.lri.l, 1H43-8; K.O.B., 1848; ambassador I at Washington, 1849; concluded the Bolwer-Glajtop treaty: minister at Florence, 152; commissioner in the Daniibian principalities, 185G; ambassador at Constantinople, Ifvvs-iio; M.I for Tamworth, 1868; created Baron Dulling and Bulwer, 1871; published historical works.
  • George Burder George Burder (1752-1832), congregationalist theologian; engraver, 1778; took to preaching, 1776; pastor at Lancaster, 1778; travelling preacher in England and Wales; pastor at Coventry, 1784: pastor of the Fetter Lane, London, congregation, 1803-32; secretary of the London Missionary Society, 1803-27; a founder of the London Missionary Society, 1795, of the Religious Tract Society, 1799, and of the British and Foreign Bible Society, 1804; edited devotional books.
  • Anthony Burgess Anthony Burgess (. 1662), nonconformist; entered St. John's College, Cambridge, 1623; fellow of Emmanuel College; chaplain to the parliamentary garrison, Coventry; member of the Westminster Assembly; rector of Sutton Ooldfield, Warwickshire; ejected, 1662; author of sermons and doctrinal treatises.
  • Samuel Butler Samuel Butler (1774-1839), bishop of Lichfleld ; educated at Rugby and St. John's College, Cambridge; B.A., 1796; fellow, 1797; D.D., 1811; head-muster of Shrewsbury, 1798-1836; vicar of Kenihvorth, 1802; prebendary of Lichfield, 1807; edited Eschylus (four volumes), 1809-26; bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, 1836; published atlases and text-books of ancient and modern geography.
  • John Butterworth John Butterworth (1727-1803), baptist minister at Coventry, 1753-1803; publishedA New ConI cordance 1767.
  • John Byron John Byron , first BARON BYRON (d. 1652), M.P. for Nottingham, 1624-5; K.B. at Charles I's coronation, 1625; M.P. for Nottinghamshire, 1628-9; served in the Low Countries; served against the Scots, 1640; lieutenant of the Tower, December 1641 -February 1642; joined Charles I at York; sent from Coventry to Oxford; held Oxford, 28 Aug.-lO Sept. 1642; victorious at Powick Bridge, 22 Sept.; fought at Edgehill, 23 Oct. 1642; in Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire, December 1642May 1643; fought at Roundway Down and New bury, 1643; created Karon Byron of Rochdale, October 1643; given command in Lancashire; defeated at Nantwioh, 1644; fought at Marston Moor, Ormskirk, and Montgomery, 1644; besieged in Chester, 1645-6; surrendered. Carnarvon Castle, 1646; went to Paris; sent to seize Anglesey, 1648; sent by Ormonde to invite Charles II to j Ireland, January 1649; i proscribed by the parliament; tutor to the Duke of York. i
  • Edmund Calamy Edmund Calamy , the elder (1600-1666), puritan ; B.A. Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, 1619; known as a Calvinist; B.D., 1632; vicar of St. Mary's, Swaffham, Cambridge; lecturer at Bury St. Edmunds, 1627 ?-36, retiring when the bishop insisted on observance of church ceremonies; lecturer at Rochford, Essex; incumbent of St. Mary's, Aldermanbury, 1639-62; one of the authors of Smectymnuus written against Bishop Joseph Hall's claim of divine right for episcopacy; member of Westminster Assembly, 1643; presbyterian and intolerant of Congregationalism; opposed Charles I's trial and execution; advocated the Restoration; compelled by his wife to refuse the see of Lichfield and Coventry; member of Savoy conference, 1661; ejected, 1662; imprisoned for unlicensed preaching, 1663; published sermons.
  • Thomas Cooper Thomas Cooper, Couper or Cowper (fl. 1626), divine; educated at Westminster; student of Christ Church, Oxford, 1598; B.D., 1600; vicar of Great Budworth, Cheshire, 1601-4; vicar of Holy Trinity, Coventry, 1604-10; preacher to the fleet, 1626; published tracts against the Gunpowder plot, 1606-9, against witchcraft, 1617, and murder, 1620.
  • William of Cornhill William of Cornhill (d. 1223), bishop of Coventry and Lichfield; one of King John's clerks; an offlcenof the exchequer, 1204; rector of Maidstone, 1206; justiciar, 1208; bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, 121E; much employed by King John and faithful to him to the last; supported Henry III; benefactor of Lichfield Cathedral.
  • Frederick Cornwallis Frederick Cornwallis (1713-1783), archbishop of Canterbury; younger son of Cliarles, fourth Baron Cornwallis; educated at Eton; U.A. Christ's College, Cambridge, 1736; fellow; D.D., 1748; heueflced in Suffolk and Norfolk, 1740; canon of Windsor, 1746; bishop of Lichfleld and Coventry, 1760. dean of St. Paul's, 1766; archbishop of Canterbury, 1768; noted for his hospitality at Lambeth; published four sermons.
  • James Cornwallis James Cornwallis fourth Earl Cornwallis (1742-1824), bishop; third son of Charles, first earl Cornwallis; educated at Eton; B.A. Christ Church, Oxford, 1763; fellow of Merton; M.A., 1769; a pluralist rector in Kent, 1769-81; D.C.L., 1775; dean of Salisbury, 1 1776; bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, 1781-1824; dean of Windsor, 1791; dean of Durham, 1794; succeeded as fourth Earl Cornwallis, 1823; published five sermons.
  • Captain Cox Captain Cox , of Coventry (ft. 1575), collector of ballads and romances; present at Kenilworth on Queen Elizabeth's visit, 1575.
  • Benjamin Cox Benjamin Cox, coxe, or Cockes (fl. 1646), baptist minister; entered Christ Church, Oxford, 1609; M.A. Broadgates Hall, 1617; beneficed in Devonshire; retracted puritan opinions, 1639; baptist preacher at Bedford; imprisoned at Coventry, 1643; baptist preacher in London, 1645; conformed, 1662; again became a baptist; published controversial tracts, 1645-6.
  • Leonard Cox Leonard Cox (fl. 1572), schoolmaster ; B.A. Cambridge: asked M.A. at Oxford, 1530; schoolmaster at Reading, 1541-6; travelled: taught school at Caerleon; schoolmaster at Coventry, 1672; published Rhetoryke, 1524, a grammatical tract, 1540, and translations.
  • Mary Ann Cross Mary Ann Cross or MARIAN (1819-1880), novelist under the name of George Eliot; nee Evans; was sent to school at Coventry, 1832; reproduced much of her early history in her novels; converted from evangelism to more liberal views by the influence of Charles Bray, a ribbon manufacturer of Coventry, 1842: finished Miss Brabant's translation of Strauss's Life of Jesus,* 1846; visited Geneva, 1849; on returning to England contributed to the Westminster Review of which she became (1861) assistant editor; resigned the post, 1853; translated Feuerbach's Essence of Christianity 1854; attracted by positivism; formed a lifelong union without legal form with George Henry Lewes, 1864; visited Berlin, 1854; published Amos Barton serially in 'Blackwood's Magazine 1887, under the pseudonym of George Eliot published Scenes of Clerical Life, 1858, 'Adam Bede 1859,The Mill on the Floes 1860, and Silas Marner 1861; visited Florence, 1860 and 1861, in search of material for an Italian story of the time of Savonarola; published Romola in serial instalments in the Cornhill Magazine 1862-3; finishe Felix Holt 1866; travelled in Spain, 1867: produced The S Gypsy 1868; published Middlemarch in parts, 1871-2, and Daniel Deronda in the same way, 1874-6; wrote the Impressions of Theophrastus Such 1878 (published, 1H79); founded, after Lewes's death in 1878 the George Henry Lewes Studentship 1879; married Mr. J. W. Cross, then;i bunker at Nrw York, t May 1880. In addition to her novels she published Agatha a poem, 18C.9,Jtibal and other 1'ot-tiis 1H74, and many pssays. She claimed in all IUT books to be an {esthetic teacher and to interpret philosophical ideas. Most of her novel?, despite the tendency to didacticism, stand in the first rank of literary fiction.
  • Thomas Dean Thomas Dean (18th cent.), musician ; organist at Warwick and Coventry; Mus. Doc. Oxford, 1731; wrote music for Oldmixon's Governor of Cyprus 1703.
  • Anthony Draycot Anthony Draycot (d. 1571), divine; principal of White Hall and Pirye Hall, Oxford; doctor of canon law, 1522; rector of Draycot; prebendary of Lincoln, 1539, of Lichfield, 1566; chancellor of Lincoln, Coventry, and Lichfield; stripped of all his preferments except Draycot, 1559.
  • Thomas Edwards Thomas Edwards (1729-1785), divine; M.A. Clare Hall, Cambridge, 1754; fellow; master of the free grammar school and rector of St. John the Baptist, Coventry, 1758-79; D.D., 1766; published Prolegomena in Libros Veteris Testamenti Poeticos 1762, and wrote against doctrine of irresistible grace, 1759.
  • George Eld George Eld (1791-1862), antiquary ; editor of the Coventry Standard; last mayor of Coventry before the Municipal Reform Act, 1834-5; restored the fourteenth-century interior of the mayoress's parlour, Coventry, 1834-5.
  • Edward Ellice Edward Ellice, the elder (1781-1863), politician ; educated at Winchester and Marischal College, Aberdeen; M.A., 1800; engaged in the Canada fur trade, 1803; amalgamated North-west, X.Y., and Hudson's Bay companies, 1821; M.P., Coventry, 1818, 1820, 1830, and 1831-63; secretary to the treasury, and whip in Lord Grey's government, 1830-2; proposed, when secretary at war (1832-4), that appointments in the army should be made directly from his office; helped to found Reform Club, 1836; supported Palmerston as premier; D.C.L. St. Andrews; privately urged French government to send troops into Spain, 1836; deputy-governor of the Hudson's Bay Company.
  • Basil Feilding, 2nd Earl of Denbigh Basil Feilding, 2nd Earl of Denbigh (d. 1674), eldest sou of William Feilding, first earl; educated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge; K.B., 1626; summoned to Lords as Baron Feilding of Newnham Paddox, 1628; volunteer at the siege of Bois-le-Duc, 1629; ambassador extraordinary to Venetian republic, 1634-9; , fought for parliament at Edgehill, 1642; commauder-inchief of parliamentarian forces in Warwick, Worcester, I Stafford, Shropshire, Coventry, and Lichfield, 1643; defeated royalists near Dudley, 1644; suspected of halfheartedness, and superseded, 1644; a commissioner for the treaty of Uxbridge, 1645; refused to have any share in the trial of Charles I, 1648; state councillor, 1649-51; gradually went over to the royalists; created Baron St. Liz, 1664.
  • Humphrey Fenn Humphrey Fenn (d. 1634), puritan divine; B.A. Queens' College, Cambridge, 1573; M.A. Peterhouse, 1576; vicar of Holy Trinity, Coventry, 1578-84: suspended (1584) for refusing to subscribe Whitgift's three articles; restored, 1585; again suspended, 1590; cited before the Star-chamber, 1591; remanded, 1591; released, 1592; protested against episcopacy in his will.
  • Accepted Frewen Accepted Frewen (1588-1664), archbishop of York; eldest son of John Frewen; fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, 1612; M.A., 1612; chaplain to Lord Digby (Bristol) in Spain; chaplain to the king and canon of Canterbury, 1625; president of Magdalen, 1626-43; dean of Gloucester, 1631; mainly instrumental in presentation of university plate to Charles I, 1642; bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, 1643; his estate declared forfeited by parliament, 1652; proscribed by Oliver Cromwell; archbishop of York, 1660-4; benefactor of Magdalen College, Oxford.
  • Geoffrey de Muschamp Geoffrey de Muschamp (d. 1208), bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, 1198; archdeacon of Cleveland, 1189; elected bishop by monks of Coventry at instance of Richard I and Archbishop Hubert, 1198; said to have fled from England, 1207.
  • Geoffrey Geoffrey (d. 1235?), prior of Coventry, 1216; choeen by bis monks to see of Lichfleld and Coventry, 1223, but the election quashed by Archbishop Stephen Langton and Honoritis III; suspended for resisting visitation of new bishop, 1232; author of chronicle cited in Dugdale's 4 Warwick
  • George, Duke of Clarence George, Duke of Clarence (1449-1478), son of Richard, duke of York (1411-1460); after his father's death in 1460 was sent for safety to Utrecht, whence he was brought back on his brother Edward IV's accession in 1461 and created Duke of Clarence; lord lieutenant.!; at Calais married, contrary to Edward's wishes (1469), I.-abella, the elder daughter of the Earl of Warwick; invaded England in company with his lather-in-law ami made Kin: Edward pri-oncr at Edgecot, 1469; forced by public opinion to release him: after obtaining an amnesty bemplieated with Warwick in an unsuccessful Lancastrian rising in Linclnshire; tied to France, March 117(i: returned to England with Warwick, hk-ptember 1470, and Edward fled the country; disapproved of the restoration of Henry VI, and in 1471 deserted to his brother at Coventry with four thousand men; fought with Edward at Barnet, 1471, and Tewkesbury, 1471, and assisted in the re-establishment of the York dynasty; became involved in a violent quarrel with his brother, Gloucester, who wished to marry Anne Neville see ANNK, QUKI RICHARD III and share her mother's inheritance; reconciled with Gloucester by a parliamentary partition of the Neville estates, 1474; offered himself (1476) as a suitor for the hand of Mary of Burgundy, the successor of Charles the Bold; his scheme vetoed by Edward IV; revenged himself on some of the queen's adherents; charged with compassing the death of the king by necromancy and 1 with other treasonable practices and committed to the Tower; attainted by parliament, January 1478, and sentenced to death; secretly executed within the Tower, 17 or 18 Feb. 1488. The mode of death is uncertain, the statement that he was drowned in a butt of malmsey being perhaps only a London rumour.
  • Robert Glover Robert Glover (d. 1555), protestant martyr; of Eton and King's College, Cambridge; M.A., 164 L; burnt for heresy at Coventry.
  • Godiva Godiva or Godgifu (Jl. 1040-1080), benefactress : wife of Leofric, earl of Mercia; built and endowed monasteries at Stow and Coventry; benefactress of houses at other places. The oldest form of the legend of her riding naked through Coventry to obtain the release of the villa from toll is given by Roger of Wendover (Flores Historiarum); the current story originates with Rapin (1732); the procession at Coventry (last held, 1887) was instituted in 1678.
  • Richard Grafton Richard Grafton (d. 1572 ?), chronicler and printer; with Edward Whitchurch had Coverdale's bible reprinted ar Antwerp (Matthews's bible), 1537, and Parta, 1538- theirGreat Biblesuppressed at Paris, but printed in England, 1539; ordered to be purchased by every parish, and frequently reissued; with Whitrhurch received exclusive patents for church service-books and primers; as king's printerissued prayer-book of 1M, acts of parliament (1662-3), and Lady Jane Grey's proclnmation; chief master of Christ's Hospital, 1660; M.P.. London, 1653-4 and 1566-7, and Coventry, 156J-l7 warden of the Grocers Company, 1665-6; master of Bridewell, 1659-60; charged by Stow with garbling the editions issued by him of Hardyng'sChronicle(1543) and Hall's Union (1648); himself compiledAbridgement of the Chronicles of England(1562) and a Chronicle at Large (1568). An augmented edition of the latter (1611) was reprinted by Sir H. Ellis, 1809.
  • Obadiah Grew Obadiah Grew (1607-1689), ejected minister: M.A. Balliol College, Oxford, 1632; D.D., 1661: master of Atherstone grammar school, 1632: appointed vicar of St. Michael's, Coventry, 1645; pleaded with Cromwell for the king's life, 1648; favoured royalist rising, 1659: obliged to resign living, 1662, and leave Coventry, 1666; returned, H172. and with John Bryan (. 1676) founded presbyterian congregation; imprisoned nnder Five Mile Act, 1682; his Sinner's Justification(1670) translated into Welsh, 1785.
  • B. Griffin B. Griffin (f. 1696), poet (probably Bartholomew Griffin of Coventry), author of Fidessa, more chaste than kinde 1596 (the third sonnet of which was reproduced in The Passionate Pilgrime 1599).
  • Maria Gunning Maria Gunning , afterwards Countess of Coventry (1733-1760). See Coventry.
  • John Hacket John Hacket (1692-1670), bishop of Coventry and Lichfield; educated at Westminster and Trinity College, Cambridge; chaplain to Lord-keeper Williams; incumbent of St. Andrew's, Holborn, 1624-45, and Cheam, Surrey, 1624; chaplain to James I, 1623; prebendary of Lincoln, 1623; archdeacon of Bedford, 1631; attempted to moderate Laud's zeal; as member of committee of religion made able speech before Commons in defence of deans and chapters, 1641; after the Restoration resumed preaching at St. Paul's as canon residentiary; bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, 1661-70; restored Lichfield Cathedral, partly at his own expense; bequeathed money to Trinity College, Cambridge, and his books to the university; chief work, Scrinia Reserata (first published, 1693), a life of Archbishop Williams.
  • John Hales (d.1571) John Hales or Hayles (d. 1571), author; clerk of the hanaper to Henry VIII, Edward VI, and Elizabeth; converted his grant of St. John's Hospital, Coventry, into free school, 1548; as M.P. for Preston introduced measures for benefiting the poor, 1548; at Frankfort in Mary's reign; his property confiscated, 1557; imprisoned by Elizabeth for pamphlet affirming legality of marriage of Lord Hertford and Lady Katherine Grey, 1564; published Highway to Nobility 1543, and Introductions ad Grammaticam: translated Plutarch's Precepts for the Preservation of Health c. 1543.
  • Henry IV Henry IV (1367-1413), king of England; son of John of Gaunt; sometimes called Henry of Boliugbroke from his birthplace: styled Earl of Derby in early life; K.G., 1377; married Mary de Bohuu, coheiress of Hereford, 1380; praised by Froissart; as one of the five lords appellant opposed Robert de Vere, who, marching on London, compelled Richard II to grant their demands, 1387; took part in proceedings of Mer Eleanor of Provence, 1236, in which year was passed the I ciless parliament 1388, but gradually regained Richard's as.siy.eof Merton; depended on guidance of his wife's uncle, favour; joined * crusade of the Teutonic knighte against William de Valence, and Provencal favourites; invited the legate Otho to England; favoured Simon de Montfort (husband of his sister Eleanor), but quarrelled with him, 1239; opposed by Richard, Earl of Cornwall and citizens of London; made concessions; entertained Baldwin II, emperor of the East, 1238; his life attempted by a crazy clerk, 1238; kept see of Winchester vacant, the monks refusing (1238) to elect William of Valence; founded Netley Abbey, 1239; gave the archbishopric of Canterbury to Boniface of Savoy, 1241, and see of Hereford to another foreigner; allowed the pope to take a fifth of the clergy's goods and many benefices, c. 1240; made Peter of Savoy Earl of Richmond; joined the Count of La Marche and others in an expedition to Gascouy, Lithuania, 1390; went on pilgrimage to Jerusalem, 13921393, being entertained by the kings of Bohemia and Hungary, the Archduke of Austria, and the Venetians; one of the council during Richard's absence in Ireland, 1395; took a decided part for the king against hie former allies, and was created Duke of Hereford, 1397; appealed Norfolk of treason, but was not allowed to fight with him, being banished the realm for ten years, 1398; exiled for life, his Lancaster estates also being confiscated during his stay at Paris; with the two Aruudels and others, secretly left France and lauded near Bridlington, 1399; joined by northern nobles; held council at Doncaster, and with a large army marched to Bristol, where some of the royal officers were executed, July 1399; met King Richard, 1242, but was deserted by him and forced by LouU IX to who had been deserted by his army, at Flint; was pro retreat, 1243; brought back more foreigners, detaching his brother Richard "from the opposition by marrying him to Sanchia of Provence; compelled by Innocent IV to recall the banished bishop of Winchester; obliged, in order to get a scutage, to admit four guardians of liberties to his council; made other concessions to the baronage; with money furnished by Richard of Cornwall undertook successful Welsh campaign, 1245; joined in remonstrance against the pope's exactions, but gave way, and laid a heavy tallage on London, 1246; enriched his foreign half-brothers from church revenues; refused an aid, 1249; exacted more money from Londoners and Jews; received homage for mised restoration of his estates; took the king to London, where Richard resigned the crown, 29 Sept. 1399; obtained the throne by popular election; founded the order of the Bath before his coronation, 1399; condemned Richard, who soon died, possibly starved, to perpetual imprisonment, 1399; crushed rising of Richard's dispossessed supporters, 1400: made expeditious against the Scots (1400) and Welsh (1400 and 1401) and entertained the Greek emperor, Manuel Palaiologos, 1400; married as his second wife Joan, regent of Brittany, 1402; was attacked by the dukes of Orleans and Burgundy in France and by Franciscan conspirators in England, 1402; failed to subdue Lothian from Alexander III of Scotland on his marriage, the Welsh, 1402; defeated the discontented Percies at 1251; appointed Simon de Montfort governor of Gascony;, Shrewsbury. 1403; received submission of Northumber insulted de Montfort with accusations, 1252; was refused money for a crusade, 1252; confirmed the charters in return for money, 1253, and made a second expedition into Gascony; visited Pontiguy, Foutevraud, and Paris; agreed to bear cost of Pope Alexander II's war with Manfred in return for grant of Sicilian crown to his son Edmund; unable to obtain regular grants; demanded from parliament at Westminster (1258) a third of all property, the barons attending in armour and led by Roger Bipod, fourth earl of Norfolk; met barons in Mad Parliament at Oxford (1258), which drew up Provisions giving land, 1403; compelled to agree to expulsion of aliens; was strengthened by defeat of French at Dartmouth, 1404; received liberal supplies from Unlearned parliament at Coventry, 1404; escaped assassination at Eltham, 1404; suppressed revolt of Northumberland, Archbishop Scrope, and the earl marshal, 1406; captured the heir to the Scottish throne, 1405; compelled by parliament to nominate a constitutional council, to submit to an audit of accounts, and reform his household, 1406: debarred the Beauforts from the succession, 1407; finally defeated Northumberland and Bardolf at barons control of the executive and the nomination of half, Bramham Moor, 1408; declined in health and energy, but the council, a committee of twenty-four being appointed I interested himself in Archbishop ArnndePs attempt to to carry out reforms; made peace with France by giving heal the papal schism: supported the church party in preup Normandy and his hereditary possessions: on his re- venting proposed confiscation of their temporalities, but turn from France to England brought accusation against I was himself refused a revenue for life, 1410; defeated attempt to force him to abdicate in favour of Prince Miiry, broke off Burgundian alliance, and undertook a progress, 1411-12; increased Chaucer's pension and patronised Gower: died in Jerusalem Chamber, Westminster; his tomb at Canterbury opened, 1832.
  • Henry Henry VI (1421-1471), king of England; son of Henry Y; born at Windsor; ruled through a council during his minority, his uncle, Humphrey of Gloucester, being protector, and Richard Beauchamp, earl of Warwick, his master; appeared in public functions in early childhood; crowned at Westminster, 1429, and at Paris, 1430: opened parliament in person, 1432; mediated at a great council between Gloucester and Bedford, 1434; his precocious interest in politics restrained by the council: admitted to share in government, 1437, but warned that he was exercising it unprofitably; identified himself with Cardinal Beaufort's peace policy; greatly interested in scheme for his marriage with a daughter of the Oomte d'Armagnac, 1441-3; attained legal majority, 1442; concluded two yearstruce with France, 1443; married Margaret of Anjou, daughter of the Duke of Lorraine, 1445; under influence of Beaufort and Suffolk, ordered Gloucester's arrest, 1447; surrendered Maine for prolongation of truce with France, 1448; made constant progresses through England; secretly supported Suffolk, but was obliged to exile him, 1450; attempted to suppress Cade's rising, but fled to Kenihvorth, leaving the work to Archbishop Kemp and Waynflete, 1450; lost Normandy; obliged to make Richard, duke of York, a councillor, and agree to arrest of Edmund Beaufort, duke of Somerset; made Somerset captain of Calais, and refused to remove him from court, 1451; lost Guienne, 1451; deeply in debt; attempted a general pacification and pardon, 1452; won back part of Guienne, 1452, but lost it all, 1453; temporarily lost his reason, 1453; on his recovery released Somerset and excluded York from the council, 1455: slightly wounded at first battle of St. Albans, 1455; again became ill; persuaded on recovery to remove York from office, 1456, but allowed him to remain in the council, and with the help of Buckingham maintained peace for two years; after Salisbury's victory (1459) at Bloreheath marched against Ludlow and drove York and the Nevilles from England, 1459, afterwards attainting them at Coventry; was defeated and captured by Warwick at Northampton, and compelled to acknowledge York as heir to the crown, 1460; in spite of the defeat of the Yorkists by his queen (Margaret) at Wakefield(1460) and St. Albans (1461). Henry fled northward after Edward, duke of York, was proclaimed king, 1461; at York while Towton Field was fought unsuccessfully by his friends, 1461; attainted by the Yorkists, 1461; took refuge with the Scots, 1461; granted charter to Edinburgh, 1464; narrowly escaped capture at Hexham, 1464; lurked disguised for a year on the Lancashire and Yorkshire border; was captured and imprisoned in the Tower for five years (1465-70); restored by Warwick, 1470; presided at a parliament, but (1471) fell into the hands of Edward IV, and was taken by him to Barnet; after battle of Baruet (1471) was recommitted to the Tower; murdered on the. night of Edward's return, Richard of Gloucester being held responsible; worshipped as a martyr by north countrymen; his canonisation proposed by Henry VII. Henry VI was too weak to rule men, but was genuinely pious, and a liberal patron of learning. Besides taking great interest in the universities of Oxford and Caen, he founded Eton (1440) and King's College, Cambridge (1441), and suggested to his queen Margaret the foundation of Queens College, Cambridge, 1448.
  • James Hewitt James Hewitt, Viscount Lifford (1709-1789), lord chancellor of Ireland; barrister, Middle Temple, 1742; M.P., Coventry, 1761; king's Serjeant, 1760; judge of the king's bench, 1766; lord chancellor of Ireland, 1768-89; created Baron Lifford in Irish peerage, 1768, and viscount, 1781; his decisions as chancellor printed, 1839.
  • John Hewitt John Hewitt (1719-1802), mayor of Coventry, 1755, 1758, and 1760; published Journal 1779-90, Memoirs of Lady Wilbrihammon c. 1778, and Guide for Constables 1779.
  • Philemon Holland Philemon Holland (1552-1637), translator; M.A. Trinity College, Cambridge, 1574, major fellow, 1674; claimed degree of M.D.: master of free school, Coventry, 1628; received pension from city, 1632: epitaph by himself in Holy Trinity Church: his chief translations those of Livy, 1600, Pliny's Natural History 1601, Plutarch's Morals 1603, Suetonius, 1606, Ammianus Marcellinus, 1609, Oamden*s Britannia,* 1610, and Xenophon's Cyropaedia 1632; praised by Fuller, Hearne, and Southey.
  • William Holles Sir William Holles or Hollis (1471?-1572), lord mayor of London: master of MercersCompany, 1538; sheriff of London, 1527; knighted, 1633; lord mayor, 1539-40; left bequests to Coventry, the Mercers Company, and St. Helen's, Bishopsgate; ancestor of earls of Clare and dukes of Newcastle.
  • John Baker Holroyd John Baker Holroyd, first Earl of Sheffield (1735-1821), statesman and friend of Gibbon; purchased Sheffield Place, Sussex, 1769; raised and commanded dragoon regiment; M.P., Coventry, 1780-3, Bristol, 1783-1802; active in suppressing Gordon riots, 1780; created Irish baron, 1781; created Earl of Sheffield and Viscount Pevensey in peerage of Ireland, 1816: British peer, 1802: president of board of agriculture, 1803; privy councillor, 1809; lord of board of trade, 1809; published pamphlets on social and commercial questions; edited Gibbon's Miscellaneous Works 1796, and Memoirs 1826..
  • Walter Farquhar Hook Walter Farquhar Hook (1798-1875), dean of Chichester; son of James Hook (1772 ?-1828) ; educated at Winchester and Christ Church, Oxford; M.A., 1824; D.D., 1837; curate at Whippingham; incumbent of Holy Trinity, Coventry, 1828-37; preached at Chapel Royal his sermonHear the Church 1838, affirming apostolical succession of English bishops; as vicar of Leeds, 1837-59, built new parish church (1841) and many others, with schools and parsonage houses; obtained act of parliament for subdivision of parish (1844); propounded in letter to Bishop Thirlwall (1846) scheme of I rate-paid schools with separate religious instruction; dean of Ohichester, 1859-75. His works includeChurch Dictionary 1842,Dictionary of Ecclesiastical Biography 1845-52, and Lives of Archbishops of Canterbury, 1 18601875 (index, 1876).
  • William Hopkins William Hopkins (1647-1700), divine; son of George Hopkins; M.A. St. Mary Hall, Oxford. 1668; D.D., 1692; chaplain to Henry Coventry (1619-1686) in second embassy to Sweden, 1671; prebendary of Worcester, 1676, and master of St. Oswald's Hospital, 1697; published Book of Bertram or Ratrammw concerning the Body and Blood of the Lord 1686; assisted Gibson with edition of Saxon Chronicle and Camden in Britannia
  • John Hough (bishop) John Hough (1651-1743), bishop of Worcester: M.A. Magdalen College, Oxford, 1676; D.D., 1687; fellow: elected president, 1687, but ejected by James II; reinstated. 1688; resigned, 1699; bishop of Oxford, 1690-9, of Lichfleld and-Coventry, 1699-1717, of Worcester, 17171743; refused primacy, 1715; benefactor to Magdalen College, Lichfield, and Worcester.
  • Richard Hurd Richard Hurd (1720-1808), bishop of Worcester ; fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge; M.A., 1742; D.D., 1768; his editions of Horace's Ars Poetica (1749) and Epistola ad Augustum 1751, praised by Warburton and translated into German; defended Warburton against Jortin (1755) and edited (1767) his Remarks on Hume's Natural History of Religion; issued Moral and Political Dialogues 1759, and Letters on Chivalry and Romance 1762; his attacks on Leland and Jortin reprinted, with caustic preface by Parr, 1789; preacher at Lincoln's Inn, 1765; archdeacon of Gloucester, 1767; Warburtonian lecturer, 1768; bishop of Liclifleld and Coventry, 1774-81, of Worcester, 1781-1808; preceptor to Prince of Wales, 1776; declined the primacy, 1783; complete works issued, 1811.
  • William James (bishop) William James (1542-1617), bishop of Durham; M.A. Christ Church, Oxford, 1566; D.D., 1574; master of University College, Oxford, 1572; archdeacon of Coventry, 1577-84; dean of Christ Church, 1584; vice-chancellor, 1581 and 1590; chaplain to Leicester; dean of Durham, 1596-1600; bishop of Durham, 1606-17; ordered to receive Arabella Stuart, 1611.
  • John Ketterich John Ketterich or Catrik (d. 1419 successively bishop of St. David's, Lichfield and Coventry and Exeter; his name also spelt Catryk, Catterich, and Catrik, the latter appearing on his tomb; educated probably at one of the universities; employed on mission abroad, 1406-11; archdeacon of Surrey, 1410-14; king proctor at the papal court, 1413; bishop of St. Davids 1414-16; one of the English representatives at council of Constance, 1414; bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, 1416 postulated to see of Exeter, 1410: died at Florence.
  • William de Kilkenny William de Kilkenny (d. 1256), bishop of Ely and keeper of the seal; archdeacon of Coventry, 1248: keeper of the seal, 1260-5; bishop of Ely, 1255; died at Surgho in Spain.
  • Rowland Lee Rowland Lee or Legh (d. 1543), bishop of Coventry and Lichfleld and lord president of the council in the marches of Wales; educated at Cambridge; ordained priest, 1512; doctor of decrees, 1520; prebendary of Lichfield, 1527; employed under Wolsey in the suppression of the monasteries, 1528-9; royal chaplain and master in chancery; bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, 1534-13, and president of the king's council in the marches of Wales, 1634; devoted his energies to suppressing Welsh disorder, 1534-40.
  • William Lloyd (bishop) William Lloyd (1627-1717), successively bishop of St. Asaph, of Lichfleld and Coventry, and of Worcester; son of Richard Lloyd (1595-1659); of Oriel and Jesus Colleges, Oxford; M.A., 1646; M.A. Cambridge, IMt; {.rvtiii;iry of Ripon, If,ii3: !).!., M7: prebondavy of Salisbury, 1667: archdeacon of Merioneth, 1668-72; dean of Banger and prebendary of St. Paul's, 1672; bishop of St. Asaph, 1680; tried with the six other bishops on the charge of publishing a seditious libel against the king and acquitted, 1688; bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, 1692, of Worcester, 1700; being half crazed by excessive study of the apocalyptic visions prophesied to Queen Anne, Barley, Evelyn, and Wbiston; a staunch supporter of the revolution and an excellent scholar; engaged Burnet to undertake The History of the Reformation of the Church of England and gave him valuable assistance; published sermons and controversial pamphlets.
  • George Long George Long (1780-1868), police magistrate : barrister, Gray's Inn, 1811; magistrate at Great Marlborough Street police court, 1839-41: recorder of Coventry, 18401842; magistrate at Maryleboue police court, 1841-69; published legal works.
  • Robert Marmion Robert Marmion (d. 1143), carried on war during anarchy in Stephen's reign; killed in fight with Earl of Chester at Coventry.
  • Luke Milbourne Luke Milbourne (1622-1668), ejected nonconformist divine; M.A. Emmanuel College, Cambridge, 1646; perpetual curate of Houiley; royalist; in retirement at Kenilworth, 1645-60: ejected, 1668: schoolmaster at Coventry; compelled to leave by the Five Mile Act, 166B.
  • Peter Moore Peter Moore (1753-1828), politician : amassed a fortune in the East India Company: radical M.P., Coventry, 1803: known as the most adroit manager of private bills: lent his name as director to companies with such freedom that he was obliged to fly to Dieppe to escape arrest, 1825; gave up nearly all his property; died at Abbeville.
  • Edward Moxon Edward Moxon (1801-1868), publisher and versewriter; came to London from Wakefleld, 1817; entered the service of Messrs. Longman, 1821; published a volume of verse, 1826; set up as a publisher, lx:i(J, his first publication being Lamb's Album Verses; married Lamb's adopted daughter Emma I sola, 1833; published for Barry Cornwall, Southey, Wordsworth, Tennyson, Monckton Milnes, Landor, and Coventry Patmore; published 'SordelloBells and Pomegranates andCleon and The Statue and the Bust by Browning; accompanied Wordsworth and Crabb Robinson to Paris, 1837; visited Wordsworth at Kydal Mount, 1846; commenced a series of single-volume editions of poets, 1840. He wrote a second volume of sonnets, 1837, and the two were rcpublished together, 1843 and 1871.
  • Charles Neville Charles Neville , sixth Earl of Westmorland (1543-1601), son of Henry, fifth earl of Westmorland ; succeeded his fattier, 1563; endeavoured with the Earl of Northumberland to release Mary Queen of Scots 1569, and marched towards Tutbury: after the removal of Mary to Coventry and retreat of the rebels went to Louvain; was attainted, 1571, losing his estates; lived at Maastricht, c. 1577; went to Rome, 1581: died at Nieuport.
  • John de Neville John de Neville, fifth Baron Neville of Raby (d. 1388), son of Ralph Neville, fourth baron Neville ; fought in Oascony, 1345, 1349, and 1360; knighted, 1360: succeeded his father, 1367; K.G., 1369; admiral of the fleet, 1370: negotiated an offensive and defensive alliance with John de Montfort, duke of Brittany. 1372: commanded at the siege of Bnt: impeached, 1376, but his impeachment was reversal. 1377; as lieutenant of Aquitaine, 1378. recovered many towns and forts; constantly employed on the Scottish bonier after 1381. He founded a chantry in the Charterhouse at Coventry, erected a screen in Durham Cathedral, and built a great part of Raby Castle.
  • Nicholas of Hereford Nicholas of Hereford (fl. 1390), Lollard; student and fellow of Queen's College, Oxford; D.D. Oxford, 1382; preached constantly in support of Wycliffe, 1382, and was suspended and excommunicated; at once set out for Rome, but was ordered by the pope to be imprisoned for life; escaped to England, ISM, and was imprisoned for a time; was chief leader of the lollards after V,-litVs death, but in 1391 recanted, appointed chancellor of Hereford Cathedral; of Hereford, 1397-1417: became a Carthusian monk at St. Anne, Coventry. Very little of Hereford's work has survived except his translation of the Old Testament, which stops short in the book of Baruch, chap. iii.
  • Hugh de Nonant Hugh de Nonant (d. 1198), bishop of Lichfleld and Coventry, or Chester; brought up by his maternal uncle, Arnulf, bishop of Lisieux, who gave him preferment; entered the service of Thomas Becket before 1164, but by 1170 became clerk and friend of Henry II; successfully carried out a mission to the pope, 1184, and was made bishop of Lichfield and Coventry or Chester, as it was then styled, 1185; sent on a second mission to the pope, 1186; abroad with Henry II, 1188; involved in a quarrel with his monks at Coventry; expelled his monks, 1190, who were, however, restored, 1198; sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire, 1189, though Archbishop Baldwin objected to a bishop holding such a post: continued to hold the post of sheriff in the interest of Earl John; one of Longchamp's opponents, writing an account of his fall; made his way to Germany during Richard I's captivity, 1193; retired to Normandy, and died at Bee.
  • Brownlow North Brownlow North (1741-1820), bishop of Winchester; son of Francis North, first earl of Guilford : of Eton and Trinity College, Oxford; B.A., 1762; fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, 1763; M.A., 1766; D.C.L., 1770: canon of PhrNt Phnrh. Oxford, 1768; dean of Canterbury, 1770; bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, 1771; translated to Worcester, 1771, and to Winchester, 1781; organised clerical charities and was generous to literary men; published sermons.
  • Roger de Northburgh Roger de Northburgh (d. 1369?), bishop of Lichfield and Coventry: educated at Cambridge; a royal clerk in 1310, and royal messenger: comptroller of the wardrobe, 1315; held temporary charge of the great seal, 1321, and was papally provided to the bishopric of Lichfield and Coventry, 1322; swore to support Queen Isabella, January 1327; treasurer for three months, 1328, and occasionally employed in public business; again treasurer for a short time, 1340.
  • Joshua Oldfield Joshua Oldfield (1666-1729), presbyterian minister; son of John Oldfield (1627?-1682); studied at Lincoln College, Oxford, and Christ's College, Cambridge; minister successively at Tooting, Oxford, Coventry, and Globe Alley, Southwark; kept a training academy for presbyterians in Coventry and London: one of Daniel Williams, trustees; moderator at SailersHall conference, 1719; D.D.; intimate with Locke and Calamy.
  • John Overall John Overall (1560-1619), bishop successively of Coventry and Lichfield and of Norwich: educated at Cambridge; major fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, 1582; M.A., 1582; regius professor of theology, 1596-1607; D.D., 1596; master of Catharine Hall, Cambridge, 15981607; opposed extreme Calvinists; dean of St. Paul's London, 1602; took part in Hampton Court conference and enlargement of church catechism, 1604; prolocutor of Canterbury lower house, 1605 (his Convocation Book published by Bancroft, 1690); one of the Old Testament revisers, 1611; bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, 1614, of Norwich, 1618: correspondent of Voss and Qrotiiu; wrote against Lambeth articles and on predestination.
  • William Overton William Overton (1525?-1609), bishop of Coventry and Lichfleld; fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, 1551; M.A. (incorporated at Cambridge, 1562), D.D., 1668: rector of Balconibe and vicar of Eccleshall, 1653; canon of Chichester, 1563, treasurer, 1567; took prominent part in reception of Queen Elizabeth at Oxford, 1664; canon of Salisbury ami rector of Stoke-on-Trent, 1570; bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, 1579-1609; unjustly attacked by Martin Marprelateas an 'unlearned prelate'.
  • Dorothy Pakington Lady Dorothy Palington (d. 1679), reputed author of The Whole Duty of Man (1658); daughter of Thomas Coventry, first baron Coventry, and wife of Sir John Pakington (1620-1680); probably only a copyist of the Duty. The first public allusion to her as author was not made till 1697, while internal evidence shows that the author was a practised divine, and one acquainted with Hebrew, Syriac, and Arabic. It was probably written by Richard Allestree, who in all likelihood was the author also of other works generally ascribed to Lady Dorothy Pakington.
  • Hugh de Pateshull Hugh de Pateshull (d. 1241), bishop of Coventry and Lichfield; son of Simon de Pateshull; treasurer of the kingdom, 1234; elected bishop, 1239.
  • Henry John Patmore Henry John Patmore (1860-1883), poet; son of Coventry Kersey Dighton Patmore; educated at Ushaw College; a selection from his lyrics published privately.
  • William Purefoy William Purefoy (1580?-1669), regicide; entered parliament in 1627-8 (M.P., Coventry), and sat In the Long parliament (M.P., Warwick); held a command in the parliamentary army, and (1648) wai a member of the court which tried Charles I, signing the death-warrant; commanded the forces in Warwickshire, 1659, during Booth's insurrection.
  • Thomas Ross Thomas Ross (d. 1675), translator: B.A. Christ's College, Cambridge, 1642; adhered to Charles II in exile: keeper of Charles IPs library, 1661: M.A. Oxford, 1663; secretary to Henry Coventry (1619-1686) on embassy to Swedish court, 1663; published a translation from Silius I talicus, and other writings.
  • John Ruskin John Ruskin (1819-1900), author, artist, and social reformer; son of John James Ruskin (1785-1864), who entered partnership as wine merchant in London, 1809; brought up on strict puritanical principles; educated by Dr. Andrews, father of Coventry Patmore's first wife, and under the Rev. Thomas Dale (1797-1870) at Oamberwell; studied at King's College, London; learned drawing under Copley Fielding and J. D. Harding; entered Christ Church, Oxford, 1836; won Newdigate prize, 1839; contributed verse toFriendship's Offering and other miscellanies; travelled for his health, 1840-1; B.A., 1842; M.A., 1848; his first published writings were articles in London's Magazine of Natural History 1834: made acquaintance of Turner, 1840; paid first visit to Venice, 1841; published, 1843, first volume of Modern Painters, by a Graduate of Oxford (his name first appeared on title-page in edition of 1851); second volume published 184C, the authorship being by that time an open secret; the third and fourth volumes appeared 1856, the fifth, 1860; married, 1848, Euphemia Chalmers Gray, daughter of George Gray, a lawyer of Perth; made acquaintance of Millais, 1851; delivered at Edinburgh, 1x63, lectures onArchitecture and Painting published, 1H54: hi* marriage annulleil on his wife suit, which be did not defend, 18M: P'lMi-iml, 1849,Seven Lamps of Architecture which Ini.i..m-.i-r.iM- intluenoe in encouraging the Gothic revival of the time, and Stones of Venice I voU 1861-3: warmly detuuled the pre-ltaphaeutai in letter* to The Times and in pamphlets, 1861; published annually, 1855-9, Notes on the Royal Academy: arrange drawings at National Gallery: took chance of drawing classes at Working Men's College, Great Ormond Street, L..II.I..H. 1854-8; publubedElements of Drawing IBM, Chrint Church, Oxford, 1858; devoted himself to economic studies, and publishedUnto thU Last(tome of the paper* being first contributed to Cornhill Magazine, 1860, Munera Pulveris (contributed in part to Fraser Magazine, 1862, Gold 1863, Time and Tide 1867, and various letters and pamphlets, 1868, advocating a system of national education, the organisation of labour, and other social measures; honorary LL.D. Cambridge, 1867; between 1855 and 1870 be delivered In all part* of the country lectures, some of which were published in Sesame and Lilies, The Crown of Wild Olive 1866, and The Ethics of the Du*V 1866; removed, 1871, to Brantwood, Coniston Lake, where he remained till death; established For* ClavigersV a monthly letter to the workmen ami labourers of Great Britain and founded, isn, the guild of St. George on principles thatfood an only be got out of the ground and happiness out of honesty and thatthe highest wisdom and the highest treasure need not be costly or exclusive engaged in several industrial experiments, including the revival of the bond-made linen industry in Laugdale, and the establishment of a cloth industry at Laxey, Isle of Man; inspired and was first president ofThe Art for Schools Association first Slade professor of art at Oxford, 1870-9; again filled the post, 1883-4, and published eight volumes of lectures; founded a drawing school at Oxfor-1 and endowed a drawing-master; honorary fellow of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, 1871; suffered at times from brain fever after 1878: published at intervals during 1885-9Preterite an autobiography which was never completed: died from influenza, 20 Jan. 1900, and was buried at Coniston. A, bibliography of his writings by Thomas J. Wise and James P. Smart was issued, 1893. Many of the illustrations to his works were executed from his own drawings. He inherited from his father a Urge fortune, all of which was dispersed, chiefly in charitable and philanthropic objects, before his death.
  • Henry Ryder Henry Ryder (1777-1836), successively bishop of Gloucester and of Lichfield and Coventry; son of Nathaniel Ryder, first baron Harrowby; M.A. St. John's College, Cambridge, 1798; D.D., 1813; rector of Lutterworth, 1801, and vicar of Claybrook, 180*: canon of Windsor, 1808;lecturer of St. George's 1: d.-an o( Well.. 1*12; bishop of QlMOarter, 1815: established Gloucester Diocesan Society, 1816: translated to nee of Uohfleld, 1814; organised Church Building Association In hU diocese; published religious writings..:,;
  • Richard Sampson Richard Sampson (d. 1554), bishop of Coventry and Lichfield; of Clement Hostel and Trinity Hall, Cambridge; D.C.L., 1513; chaplain to Wolsey; advocate, 1515; dean of St. Stephen's, Westminster, and of Chapel Royali London, and Henry VIII's chaplain, 1516; archdeacon of Cornwall, 1517; prebendary of Nexvbold, 1519; resident ambassador to Spain, 1522-5; dean of Windsor, 1523-36; prebendary of St. Paul's, London, 1526-34, of Lincoln. 1527; archdeacon of Suffolk, 1529; supported Henry VIII's divorce; prebendary and dean of Lichfield, 1533; treasurer of Salisbury, 1534; bishop of Chichester, 1536-43, of Coventry and Lichfield, 1543-54; lord-president of Wales; published theological treatises.
  • John Sandford (archdeacon) John Sandford (1801-1873), divine; son of Daniel Sandford; of Glasgow University and Balliol College, Oxford; M.A., 1841; B.D., 1845; honorary canon of Worcester, 1844; archdeacon of Coventry, 1851; examining chaplain to Bishop of Worcester, 1853-60; Bampton lecturer at Oxford, 1861; active member of lower house of convocation; published religious works.
  • Laurence Saunders Laurence Saunders (d. 1555), martyr ; educated at Eton and King's College, Cambridge: M.A., 1654: B.D.; prebendary of York, 1552; rector of All Hallows, Bread Street, London, 1553; apprehended by Bonner, 1554, condemned for heresy, and burned at Coventry.
  • Richard le Scrope Richard Le Scrope (1350 ?-1405), archbishop of York; son of Henry le Scrope, first baron Sorope of Masham; probably graduated in law at Cambridge; LLD., 1386; presented to rectory of Ainderby Steeple, near Northallerton, 1367; chancellor of Cambridge University, 1378; dean of Chlchester, c. 1383; elected bishop of :hichester, 1385, but Thomas Rushook substituted for him by Richard II; notary of the curia and bishop of Coventry and Lichfleld, 1386; archbishop of York, 1398; supported revolution of 1399: resisted spoliation of the church proposed byunlearned parliament,* 1404, and took up arms at York in concert with Northumberland and Bardolf, who raised standard of rebellion eyond the Tyne; induced by treachery to surrender to Westmoreland at Shipton Moor; condemned and executed Bt York; popularly known in the north as Saint Richard Scrope.
  • Thomas Sharp Thomas Sharp (1770-1841), antiquary; hatter at Coventry, 1784-1804* studied local antiquities and made extensive topographical and other antiquarian collections. His works include A Dissertation on the Pageants, or Dramatic Mysteries, anciently performed at Coventry 1825, and Ancient Mysteries and Moralities edited from Digby MSS., 1835.
  • Gilbert Sheldon Gilbert Sheldon (1598-1877), archbishop of Canterbury; M.A. Trinity College, Oxford, 1620; B.A. 1617; Incorporated at Cambridge, 1619; fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, 1622; D.D., 1634; chaplain to lord keeper Coventry; vicar of Hackney, 1633; rector of Newlngton, 1639; warden of All Souls College, Oxford W-48, restored to the wardenship, 1669; Mend of Hyde and Falkland; took part in negotiations at Uxbridge, 1644, and attended Charles I at Oxford,.Newmarket, and In Isle of Wight; imprisoned at Oxford, 1648; became bishop of London, dean of the chapel royal, London, and master of the Savoy, London, 1660, the Savoy conference being held at his lodgings: virtually primate during. Juxon's old age; archbishop of Canterbury, 16631677; prominent adviser of Charles II; severe against itere bat frequently protected them; remained at ; during the plague; active and liberal promoter fiS 1 ! 1 * v f 8t P*" 1 8 Cathedral, London; greatly rated in church beyond the seas; as chancellor of Oxford built the Sheldonian Theatre (1669) at his own expense, and encouraged Anthony a Wood.
  • Nicholas de Sigillo Nicholas de Sigillo (fl. 1170), judge ; perhaps identical with Nicholas capellanus regis sheriff of Essex and Hertfordshire (1164-9). dean of Tilbury (1169), and archdeacon of Coventry (1179).
  • Richard Smalbroke Richard Smalbroke (1672-1749) bishop successively of St. Davids and of Lichfield and Coventry; demy and fellow (1698) of Magdalen College, Oxford: M.A., 1696; DJ) n 1708; chaplain to Archbishop Tenlson and rector of HadlciRh, 17W: canon of Hen-ford, 1710; last treasurer of IJandaff, 171): m-tor of ithingtou, 1716; bbhop of fit. Davids. 1726 31. of Ucbfldd and Coventry 1731-49; published contromaial against William Whlaton and Thomas Woolston.
  • William Smith William Smith or Smyth (1460?-1514), bishop of Lincoln and co-founder of Brasenose College, Oxford; educated in a noble family: became a member of Henry VH'a council. 1486; bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, 1493; chancellor of Oxford University. 1495; translated to Lincoln, 1496; became lord president of Wales, 1501; with Richard Button in 1518 founded Brasenose College, Oxford, the first statutes of which he drew up. He had made other charitable bequests, but is said to have peopled Lincoln Cathedral with William Smiths, probably his kinsmen.
  • Richard Stanwix Richard Stanwix (1608-1656), divine: M.A. Queen's College, Oxford, 1632; fdlow; B.D., 1G39; incorporated at Cambridge, 1640; chaplain to lord keepers Coventry and Finch; published a devotional work, 1652.
  • James Starley James Starley (1831-1881), machinist ; brought outEuropeansewing machine, 1857; patentedAriel and other improved bicycles; brought outCoventry tricycle, 1876; his masterpiece theSalvoquadricycle.
  • Robert de Stretton Robert de Stretton 9d. 1385), bishop of Coventry and Lichfield; first master of Trinity Hall, Cambridge, 1350-5; LL. D.; chaplain to the Black Prince; bishop 1359-85; His consecration was refused on account of his illiteracy, but finally, at the instance of Edward III, Pope Innocent VI finally yielded.
  • William Tong (minister) William Tong (1662-1727), presbyterian divine: minister at Chester, Knutsford, Coventry, and at Saltern Hall Court, Cannon Street, London: maintained orthodoxy on the Trinity in conferences, 1718-19; successful preacher; Williams and Barnes trustee, and distributor of the regium donum; published A Defence of Mathew Henry, with a History of Nonconformity 1693, and other works.
  • Thomas Tresham Sir Thomas Tresham (d. 1471), speaker of the House of Commons; son of William Tresham (d. 1450) ; brought up in Henry VI's household; M.P., Buckinghamshire, 1447, Huntingdonshire, 1449, Northampfeomhire, 14M I controller of the household; fought with Lancastrians at St. Albans, 1455; speaker of the parliament at Coventry, 1459; knighted by Henry VI's n after battle of St. Albans, 1461; taken prisoner at Towton and attainted, but pardoned; imprisoned, but released at restoration of Henry VI, 1470; proclaimed traitor on Edward IV's return, 1471; fought at Tewkesbury; promised pardon, but beheaded.
  • John Veysey Veysey or VOYSEY, JOHN, alias UARMAH (1465 ?-l 554), bishop of Exeter; son nml heir of William Harman (d. 1470) of Moor Hall, Sutton -Cold fit M; took the name of Veysey or Voysey, c. 1488; fellow of Magdalen College. Oxford, 1486-7: LL.D., 14!)4: chaplain to ! Elizabeth, consort of Henry VII, 1489; rector of CliftonReynes, 1496-9; held chancellorship of Lichfield, 14981502; archdeacon of Chester, 1499-1515; canon of Exeter, 1503-9: vicar of St. Michael's, Coventry, 1507-20: dean of Exeter, 1509-19; canon of St. Stephen's, Westminster, 1514-18; dean of Windsor, 1515-19; dean of Wolverhamptou, 1516-21: bishop of Exeter, 1519-51 and 1553-4; attended Henry VIII to France, 1520; president of the court of the marches of Wales, 1526; lived at Moor Hall, administering his diocese by deputy; forced by Edward Vl's courtiers to alienate to them much property of the see; removed, 1551, but was restored by Queen Mary; benefactor of Sutton-Coldfield.
  • Robert Waldegrave Robert Waldegrave (15547-1601), puritan printer; printer's apprentice in London, 1568; free of the StationersCompany, 157G; issued his first publication, 1578; his press destroyed for issuing John Odall's treatise against episcopacy, 1588; imprisoned, autumn, 1588; printed at East Molesey John Penry-i q. v.l first Marprelatc tract, 1588; moved his press to Fawsley, 1588, and to Coventry, 1589; visited La Rochellc, 1590; published many books at Edinburgh, 1590-1603: king's printer in Scotland, 1591; returned to London, 1603.
  • Humfrey Wanley Humfrey Wanley (1672-1726), antiquary; draper's apprentice at Coventry, 1687-94; read widely; went lo Oxford, 1695; assistant in the Bodleian Library, 1696; prepared the index to Edward Bernard'sCatalogue of MSS. 1697; prepared a catalogue of AngloSaxon manuscripts, 1700; assistant-secretary, 1700, and secretary, 1702-8, of the S.P.O.K., London; catalogued the Harleian MSS., 1708; librarian to the first and second earls of Oxford; F.S.A., 1717: his correspondence in the British Museum and the Bodleian.
  • Nathaniel Wanley Nathaniel Wanley (1634-1680), divine and compiler; M.A. Trinity College, Cambridge, 1657: rector of Beeby; vicar of Trinity Church, Coventry, 1662; published The Wonders of the Little World(an anecdotal treatise on mankind), 1678, and other works,
  • Charles Whittingham Charles Whittinqhak , 'the unite! (1771840), printer and founder of Chlswlck Press; apprenticed as printer and stationer at Coventry; set up press in London, 1789; rapidly extended business and began printing compact editions of standard authors; brought out with John SharpeBritish Classics ( 1 801 British Theatre andBritish Poets(180ft); started, 1809, paper-pulp manufactory at Chiswiok, where be established Chiswiok Press, 1810: issued Ohlswick edition of British Poets(100 volsA 1822; took into partnership, 1 l. his nephew Charles Whlttlngham( 1795-1876), to whom be resigned sole control, 1838. tlxi. 14* narrated before -i MM i.... fssMsM * sf*_ -..: -iw prv*ft. Tbe *torr ot a cat helping its owner to fortune has ban traeal la many countries both of southern and northern Bonnm
  • John Eardley-Wilmot John Eardley Wilmot -( 1760-1815), politician and author; con of Sir John Bardley Wilmot; of Westminster School and University College, Oxford; B.A., 1769; fellow of All Soula College, Oxford, 1769; barrUter. Inner Temple, 1773; master in chancery, 1781-1804: M.P., Tivertou, 1776-84, Coventry, 1784-96; edited his father Notes and Opinions 1802, and published a life of his father and other writings.
  • Samuel Winter Samuel Winter (1603-1666), provost of Trinity College, Dublin: of King Henry VIII's school, Coventry, and QueensCollege, Cambridge; M.A.: joined independent ministry; chaplain to four parliamentary commissions in Ireland; provost of Trinity College, Dublin, 1651-60; D.D., 1654; took lead hi forming clerical association in which independents, presbyterians, and episcopalians could meet in amity; divinity lecturer, 1659; removed from provostahip at Restoration.
  • Robert Wright Robert Wright (1560-1643), bUbop of Bristol and of Lichfleld and Coventry; H.A. Trinity College, Oxford, 1680; fellow, 1681: M.A., 1684; D.D., 1697; canon ridentiiiry and treasurer of Wells, 1601: rJMmiihi to Queen Elizabeth; chaplain in ordinary to James I; flnt wanlcn of Wadbatn CoUege, Oxford, 1611: bishop f Bristol, 1622, and of Lichfleld and Coventry, 1632; acted with Laud in crines of 1640 and after: committed to Tower of London for participation In the protest of the eleven bishops, 1641; died at Ecclesball Hall during siege by Sir William Brereton.

citin

References

^ Macklin: See the entry in Macklin, A. D., A Biographical History of African-American Artists. The Edwin Mellen Press; 2001. ISBN 0-7734-7676-8

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