Wikipedia:Today's featured article/requests

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Here the community can nominate articles to be selected as "Today's featured article" (TFA) on the main page. The TFA section aims to highlight the range of articles that have "featured article" status, from Art and architecture through to Warfare, and wherever possible it tries to avoid similar topics appearing too close together without good reason. Requests are not the only factor in scheduling the TFA (see Choosing Today's Featured Article); the final decision rests with the TFA coordinators Dank, Jimfbleak, and Mike Christie, who also select TFAs for dates where no suggestions are put forward). Please confine requests to this page, and remember that community endorsement on this page does not necessarily mean the article will appear on the requested date.

The rules for nominations are relatively simple:

  • The article must be a featured article. Editors who are not significant contributors to the article should consult regular editors of the article before nominating it for TFAR.
  • The article must not have appeared as TFA before (see the list of possibilities here)
  • The request must be either for a specific date within the next 30 days that have not yet been scheduled (10 spaces), or a non-specific date (4 spaces). If a section is full, you can wait for a vacancy, or ask the coordinators for advice. The template [email protected]}} can be used in a message to "ping" the coordinators through the notification system.

If you have an exceptional request that deviates from these instructions (for example, an article making a second appearance as TFA, or a "double-header"), please discuss the matter with the TFA coordinators beforehand.

It can be helpful to add the article to the pending requests template up to 1 year before the requested date. This does not guarantee selection, but does help others see what nominations may be forthcoming. Requestors should still nominate the article here during the 30-day timeframe.

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Featured content:

Today's featured article (TFA):

Featured article tools:


How to post a new nomination:

I.
Create the nomination subpage.

In the box below, enter the full name of the article you are nominating (without using any brackets around the article's name) and click the button to create your nomination page.


II.
Write the nomination.

On that nomination page, fill out as many of the relevant parts of the pre-loaded {{TFAR nom}} template as you can, then save the page.

Your nomination should mention:

  • when the last similar article was, since this helps towards diversity on the main page (browsing Wikipedia:Today's featured article/recent TFAs will help you find out);
  • when the article was promoted to FA status (since older articles may need extra checks);
  • and (for date-specific nominations) the article's relevance for the requested date.

You're welcome to create your own TFA text as a summary of the lead section, or you can ask for assistance at WT:TFAR. We use one paragraph only, with no reference tags or alternative names; the only thing bolded is the first link to the article title. The length when previewed (including spaces) is usually between 1025 and 1175 characters. Add a suitable free-use image if available; fair use images are not allowed.

III.
Post at TFAR.

After you have created the nomination page, add it here under a level-3 heading for the preferred date (or under a free non-specific date header). To do this, add (replacing "ARTICLE TITLE" with the name of your nominated article):
===February 29===
{{Wikipedia:Today's featured article/requests/ARTICLE TITLE}}

Nominations are ordered by requested date below the summary chart. More than one article can be nominated for the same date.

It would also then be helpful to add the nomination to the summary chart, following the examples there. Please include the name of the article that you are nominating in your edit summary.

If you are not one of the article's primary editors, please then notify the primary editors of the TFA nomination; if primary editors are no longer active, please add a message to the article talk page.

Scheduling:

In the absence of exceptional circumstances, TFAs are scheduled in date order, not according to how long nominations have been open or how many supportive comments they have. So, for example, January 31 will not be scheduled until January 30 has been scheduled (by TFAR nomination or otherwise).


Summary chart

Currently accepting requests from June 7 to July 7.

Date Article Notes Supports Opposes
Nonspecific 1 Carnaby's black cockatoo 5 0
Nonspecific 2
Nonspecific 3
Nonspecific 4
June 11 Alexander of Greece 100th anniversary of coronation 3 0
June 16 OK Computer 20th anniversary of release in the UK 1 0
June 18 1954 Guatemalan coup d'état anniversary 2 0
June 23 June 1941 uprising in eastern Herzegovina 2 0
June 29 Tropical Storm Bill (2003) 1 0
July 1 Grey jay 3 0

Tally may not be up to date. The nominator is included in the number of supporters.

Nonspecific date nominations

Nonspecific date 1

Carnaby's black cockatoo

adult female feeding, Kings Park, WA

Carnaby's black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus latirostris) is a large black cockatoo endemic to south western Australia. Measuring 53–58 cm (21–23 in) in length, it has a short crest on the top of its head, prominent white cheek patches and a white tail band. The body feathers are edged with white giving a scalloped appearance. Carnaby's black cockatoo nests in hollows situated high in trees with fairly large diameters, generally Eucalyptus. Populations to the north of Perth have become dependent on pine plantations. Much of its habitat has been lost to land clearing and development and it is threatened by further habitat destruction. With its population having halved over fifty years, Carnaby's black cockatoo is listed as endangered by the Federal and Western Australian governments. It is also classified as an endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Like most parrots and cockatoos, it is protected by CITES, an international agreement, that makes trade, export, and import of listed wild-caught species illegal. Carnaby's black cockatoo is part of an annual census, the Great Cocky Count, that has been held every year since 2009 to track the population change of threatened black cockatoo species in Western Australia.(Full article...)

Question/comment (greetings, Cas!): reading the blurb I felt something was off—I didn't get a sense of why this bird is notable beyond any other black cockatoo. Is it the description by Ivan Carnaby? Then that's missing entirely. Is it the IUCN listing? Then the lead is buried. Thoughts? —ATS 🖖 talk 18:40, 5 April 2017 (UTC)
Well it's a species of cockatoo that is endangered. Other than that it is no more or less notable than any other species of cockatoo. Actually its beak is interesting as it and another species are differentiated by beak shape. Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 12:15, 6 April 2017 (UTC)
I rejigged it like this Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 12:25, 6 April 2017 (UTC)
  • Support rewrite. Face-smile.svgATS 🖖 talk 17:28, 6 April 2017 (UTC)
  • Support with slight change - I think that it would be better to have the blurb say "Like most parrots and cockatoos" to clear up any confusion from the fact that the common name does not include the word "parrot". RileyBugzYell at me | Edits 22:14, 7 April 2017 (UTC)
Alright then, done Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 00:25, 8 April 2017 (UTC)
  • Support per above comments. Aoba47 (talk) 09:51, 17 April 2017 (UTC)
  • Comment is there nothing actually hooky or interesting in the article that could be placed in this TFA blurb? There's nothing wrong it as it stands, but it's a very bland statement of fact which could probably apply to every such bird. The Rambling Man (talk) 20:53, 19 April 2017 (UTC)
Ok, I have added a bit about the Great Cocky Count so that's a spot of civic duty. See, I find the fact that it is black and not white can be interesting to others - IRL I have explained about black cockies to people overseas and they have been surprised, thinking all cockies are white. Threatened species I think are important in highlighting environmental awareness and the fact that this critter became dependent on a non-native resource (pine plantations). Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 22:17, 19 April 2017 (UTC)
Thank you. I think the clue to its colour is in the name, but I take the point that it's unusual nevertheless. Thanks, I support this TFA. The Rambling Man (talk) 19:01, 20 April 2017 (UTC)
I did not know that. We have black cockies here, but not Carnaby's. Visitors from Canada seemed gobsmacked at the cockatoos and galahs, exclaiming that the birds here are enormous! Hawkeye7 (talk) 03:50, 8 May 2017 (UTC)
  • Support We need more cocky articles. Hawkeye7 (talk) 03:50, 8 May 2017 (UTC)

Nonspecific date 2

Nonspecific date 3

Nonspecific date 4

Specific date nominations

June 11

Alexander of Greece

King Alexander of Greece.jpg

Alexander (1893–1920) was King of Greece from 11 June 1917 until his death at the age of 27. He was the second son of King Constantine I. Alexander succeeded his father in 1917, during World War I, after the Entente Powers and the followers of Eleftherios Venizelos pushed Constantine I, and his eldest son Crown Prince George, into exile. Having no real political experience, the new king was stripped of his powers by the Venizelists and effectively imprisoned in his own palace. Venizelos, as prime minister, was the effective ruler with the support of the Entente. Though reduced to the status of a puppet king, Alexander supported Greek troops during their war against the Ottoman Empire and Bulgaria. Under his reign, the territorial extent of Greece considerably increased, following the victory of the Entente and their Allies in the First World War and the early stages of the Greco-Turkish War of 1919–22. Alexander controversially married the commoner Aspasia Manos in 1919, provoking a major scandal that forced the couple to leave Greece for several months. Soon after returning to Greece with his wife, Alexander was bitten by a domestic Barbary macaque and died of septicemia. The sudden death of the sovereign led to questions over the monarchy's survival and contributed to the fall of the Venizelist regime. After a general election and a referendum, Constantine I was restored. (Full article...)

June 16

OK Computer

Previous nomination
This is the archived discussion of the TFAR nomination for the article below. Subsequent comments should be made on the appropriate discussion page (such as Wikipedia talk:Today's featured article/requests). Please do not modify this page unless you are renominating the article at TFAR. For renominations, please add {{collapse top|Previous nomination}} to the top of the discussion and {{collapse bottom}} at the bottom, then complete a new nomination underneath. To do this, see the instructions at {{TFAR nom/doc}}.

The result was: not scheduled by Jimfbleak - talk to me? 13:57, 29 April 2017 (UTC)

A Macintosh computer from the 1990s, like the kind used by Radiohead to generate synthesized voices for the album

OK Computer is the third studio album by English alternative rock band Radiohead, released in 1997 on EMI subsidiaries Parlophone and Capitol Records. The band made a deliberate attempt to distance themselves from the guitar-oriented, lyrically introspective style of prior works like The Bends. OK Computer's abstract lyrics, densely layered sound and eclectic range of influences laid the groundwork for the more experimental style Radiohead adopted beginning with their next album, Kid A. Initially, record label executives feared the album would be difficult to market due to its progressive sound and apparent lack of hit singles. However, the album reached number one on the UK Albums Chart and became the band's highest album entry on the American charts at the time, debuting at number 21 on the Billboard 200. Critics and fans have noted that the album's lyrics and music depict a world fraught with rampant consumerism, social alienation, emotional isolation and political malaise; in this capacity, it is often interpreted as having prescient insight into the mood of 21st-century life. (Full article...)

  • Most recent similar article(s): Agharta (November 4, 2016)
  • Main editors: Brandt Luke Zorn
  • Promoted: October 10, 2012
  • Reasons for nomination: 20th anniversary of release
  • Support as nominator. Sunshineisles2 (talk) 21:29, 3 April 2017 (UTC)
  • Support as the primary contributor to the article, I'd quite like to see this on the main page for its "official" 20th anniversary (earliest global release date). I've made some minor rewording to the caption. For the image, I'd recommend the 2001 portrait of frontman Thom Yorke (the closest in time to this album's release of any available free images and, I think, evocative of this album's tone with its moody blue lighting). There's also a cropped version of the same image, but I think I prefer the full portrait which also gets the guitar in frame. Other proposals welcome! —BLZ · talk 20:23, 4 April 2017 (UTC)
  • Second thoughts on the image: One of the most famous unconventional elements of OK Computer is the use of old Macintosh text-to-speech software on "Fitter Happier" (and the background of "Paranoid Android"). Additionally, the word "computer" is right there in the title, and technological dread is the one of the central themes of the whole album. I can't be 100% sure which model of Macintosh computer Radiohead would have used, but I've included two images below. I like the look of the LC II or Mac II images, both of which have a keyboard and mouse and look more like "a generic old computer" than "a Mac" in particular. The Fred voice has been on any given Macintosh since 1984, so there is no need to get a precise model for it to be broadly accurate. Given that it's the 20th anniversary and likely to be a bit of a nostalgia trip for many readers, I like the idea of reminding folks, both old and young alike, what household computers actually looked like at that time two decades ago when these dour English blokes were darkly ruminating on the subject. Also offsets a minor concern of mine that while the 2001 Yorke portrait is pretty good, it's not quite accurate as a representation of "OK Computer-era Radiohead" (they'd released two subsequent albums by then) and would be fudging it a little bit. —BLZ · talk 20:57, 4 April 2017 (UTC)
  • Support. This is an excellent article, and May 21st is the perfect time to showcase it as TFA on its 20th anniversary. Moisejp (talk) 04:09, 8 April 2017 (UTC)
  • Support but I'd like to see the date in the blurb so there are, erm, No Suprises. ;) HJ Mitchell | Penny for your thoughts? 07:08, 23 April 2017 (UTC)
  • Comment As Jimfbleak let me know on my talk page, OK Computer will not be able to run on May 21. Here We Go Again (Ray Charles song) is set to run on May 20 for the 50th anniversary of its chart debut, a much more significant anniversary than OK Computer's 20th, and we can't run music articles on back-to-back days. However, there is another window to catch OK Computer's 20th: although May 21 is the date of the album's debut in Japan, the first global market that the album was released in, the album was not released in the band's home country the UK until June 16. I will renominate this TFAR in a few days, once June 16 is in the window of days that can get nominations.
  • Thank you all for your support so far! Especially Sunshineisles2 for catching the anniversary that I had marked down somewhere else and nominating this article. To Sunshineisles2, Moisejp, and HJ Mitchell, I will ping you all again when I reopen the nomination and I would certainly welcome your support a second time. —BLZ · talk 17:41, 24 April 2017 (UTC)


A Macintosh computer from the 1990s, like the kind used by Radiohead to generate synthesized voices for the album

OK Computer is the third studio album by English alternative rock band Radiohead, released in 1997 on EMI subsidiaries Parlophone and Capitol Records. The band made a deliberate attempt to distance themselves from the guitar-oriented, lyrically introspective style of prior works like The Bends. OK Computer's abstract lyrics, densely layered sound and eclectic range of influences laid the groundwork for the more experimental style Radiohead adopted beginning with their next album, Kid A. Initially, record label executives feared the album would be difficult to market due to its progressive sound and apparent lack of hit singles. However, the album reached number one on the UK Albums Chart and became the band's highest album entry on the American charts at the time, debuting at number 21 on the Billboard 200. Critics and fans have noted that the album's lyrics and music depict a world fraught with rampant consumerism, social alienation, emotional isolation and political malaise; in this capacity, it is often interpreted as having prescient insight into the mood of 21st-century life. (Full article...)

June 18

1954 Guatemalan coup d'état

Mural honouring Jacobo Árbenz

In 1954, a coup d'état in Guatemala, carried out by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency in a covert operation, deposed democratically elected Guatemalan President Jacobo Árbenz (pictured in mural). The coup ended the Guatemalan Revolution of 1944–54, a period of representative democracy and liberal reform. The U.S. government was motivated by a Cold War predisposition to assume Árbenz was a communist, and by a massive campaign by the United Fruit Company lobbying for his overthrow. Dwight Eisenhower authorized the CIA to carry out Operation PBSUCCESS in August 1953. The CIA armed, funded, and trained a force of 480 men led by Carlos Castillo Armas which invaded Guatemala on 18 June 1954, backed by a heavy campaign of psychological warfare. Most offensives of the invasion force were defeated, but the psychological warfare and the possibility of a U.S. invasion intimidated the Guatemalan army, which eventually refused to fight. Árbenz resigned on 27 June, and Castillo Armas became president ten days later, the first in a series of authoritarian rulers in the country. The coup was widely criticized internationally, and led to long-lasting anti-U.S. sentiment in Latin America. (Full article...)

  • Most recent similar article(s): Not certain how to count this; military articles are frequent, political history articles outside the English speaking world are rare.
  • Main editors: Vanamonde93
  • Promoted: 19 March 2017‎
  • Reasons for nomination: This is an important article for Latin American history, as this coup had a wide-ranging impact. It also influenced U.S. foreign policy in a number of ways. 18 June would be the 63rd anniversary of the launching of the coup. This would be my second TFA.
  • Support as nominator. Vanamonde (talk) 17:56, 10 May 2017 (UTC)
  • Support good history article. On underrepresented area too. Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 11:11, 19 May 2017 (UTC)

June 23

June 1941 uprising in eastern Herzegovina

The force responsible for quelling the uprising was supported by four World War I-vintage Skoda howitzers

In June 1941, Serbs in eastern Herzegovina rebelled against the authorities of the Independent State of Croatia (Croatian: Nezavisna Država Hrvatska, NDH), an Axis puppet state established during World War II on the territory of the defeated Kingdom of Yugoslavia. As the NDH imposed its authority, members of the fascist Ustaše ruling party began a campaign of persecution against Serbs throughout the country. In eastern Herzegovina, the Ustaše perpetrated a series of massacres and attacks against the majority Serb population commencing in the first week of June. Between 3 and 22 June 1941, spontaneous clashes occurred between NDH authorities and groups of Serbs in the region. This erupted into mass rebellion on 23 June, the day after the German invasion of the Soviet Union began. After several setbacks for the NDH forces, the Italians intervened, and NDH forces regained full control of all towns and transport routes by 7 July. (Full article...)

  • Most recent similar article(s): Last Yugoslavia in WWII TFA was Gudovac massacre on April 28, 2017
  • Main editors: Peacemaker67
  • Promoted: January 5, 2015
  • Reasons for nomination: Anniversary of the outbreak of the uprising, in one sense this article serves as a follow-up to the Gudovac massacre article, as it explains what happened after the initial Ustaše massacres in one region of the Independent State of Croatia.
  • Support as nominator. Peacemaker67 (click to talk to me) 05:37, 15 April 2017 (UTC)
  • Support - history article Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 11:10, 19 May 2017 (UTC)

June 29

Tropical Storm Bill (2003)

Tropical Storm Bill at peak intensity, 30 June 2003

Tropical Storm Bill was a tropical storm that affected the Gulf Coast of the United States in the summer of 2003. The second storm of the 2003 Atlantic hurricane season, Bill developed from a tropical wave on June 29 to the north of the Yucatán Peninsula. It slowly organized as it moved northward, and reached a peak of 60 mph (95 km/h) shortly before making landfall in south-central Louisiana. Bill quickly weakened over land, and as it accelerated to the northeast, moisture from the storm, combined with cold air from an approaching cold front, produced an outbreak of 34 tornadoes. Bill became extratropical on July 2, and was absorbed by the cold front later that day. Upon making landfall on Louisiana, the storm produced a moderate storm surge, causing tidal flooding. In a city in the northeastern portion of the state, the surge breached a levee, which flooded many homes in the town. Moderate winds combined with wet soil knocked down trees, which then hit a few houses and power lines, and left hundreds of thousands without electric power. Two people drowned from rough surf in Florida. Further inland, tornadoes from the storm produced localized moderate damage. Throughout its path, Tropical Storm Bill caused around $50 million in damage (2003 USD) and four deaths. (Full article...)

July 1

Grey jay

Grey jay

The grey jay (Perisoreus canadensis), also Canada jay, is a passerine bird of the family Corvidae. It is found in boreal forests of North America north to the tree line, and in the Rocky Mountains subalpine zone south to New Mexico and Arizona. Grey jays live year-round on permanent territories in coniferous forests, surviving in winter months on food cached throughout their territory in warmer periods. The birds form monogamous mating pairs, with pairs accompanied on their territories by a third juvenile from the previous season. Grey jays adapt to human activity in their territories and are known to approach humans for food, inspiring a list of colloquial names including "lumberjack", "camp robber", and "venison-hawk". The birds form monogamous mating pairs, with pairs accompanied on their territories by a third juvenile from the previous season. Grey jays adapt to human activity in their territories and are known to approach humans for food, inspiring a list of colloquial names including "lumberjack", "camp robber", and "venison-hawk". The species is associated with mythological figures of several First Nations cultures, including Wisakedjak, a benevolent figure whose name was anglicized to Whiskyjack. In 2016, an online poll and expert panel conducted by Canadian Geographic magazine selected the grey jay as the national bird of Canada, although the designation is not formally recognized. (Full article...)

  • Most recent similar article(s): Mangrove swallow
  • Main editors: Ivanvector Casliber
  • Promoted: 13 February 2017
  • Reasons for nomination: July 1 is the 150th anniversary of Canada's Confederation. There are few FAs not yet on the main page related to Canada, notably this and the Halifax Explosion, which is having its centennial later this year. This article is about a species that's been named "Canada's national bird", and additionally has a place in Canada's indigenous cultures including the Wisakedjak, so it seems quite suitable for this milestone Canada Day.

It appears that 27 Wikipedias have articles on the grey jay.

While Casliber has had various main page articles, this is the first FAC Ivanvector has to their name, according to their user page. -- Zanimum (talk) 11:59, 26 April 2017 (UTC)

  • Support as nominator. Zanimum (talk) 11:59, 26 April 2017 (UTC)
  • Support as co-editor. Just to clarify a couple things: the Grey jay has been named "Canada's national bird" only informally by a well-known Canadian magazine, though the bird also ranked highly in a public opinion poll considered in the magazine's selection. Canada has no official "national bird" designation (as of yet). Also, Wisakedjak is a character in several indigenous peoples' mythologies, not an indigenous culture itself. I do think it fitting to feature some Canadian topics around the country's sesquicentennial, and as Zanimum notes the Halifax Explosion has its own centennial late this year. Ivanvector (Talk/Edits) 12:42, 27 April 2017 (UTC)
  • Comment: Is there nothing Canadian but a bird? - We just had one, another - date-related - is in the pending list for 18 June, another is nominated just above, - readers will not get the Canadian connection, I'm afraid, - just see many birds. A good topic, no doubt about that. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 22:26, 9 May 2017 (UTC)
I think the point is that there are few featured articles on Canadian topics which have not already been TFAs, but I don't have a way to check that. As for your edits to the nom, "gray jay" is just an English variation, but "whisky jack" is fairly important for the connection to the indigenous cultures of what is now Canada. Ivanvector (Talk/Edits) 00:13, 10 May 2017 (UTC)
Feel free to restore whisky (but not bold, - I just thought four names is two too many, and thought we want Canada), only don't expect people to understand it's indigenous cultures without a link or explanation, - they will think drink. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 18:27, 10 May 2017 (UTC)
I see what you're saying. The connection is explained in the second-to-last sentence, although this section repeats the name so perhaps having it right at the top is not necessary. Not that I'm knocking whisky drinks. Ivanvector (Talk/Edits) 17:22, 11 May 2017 (UTC)
Per Ivan's comment, the only FAs not TFAs related to Canada seem to be the Halifax Explosion and grey jays. (There may be other animal and plant species, but none screams Canada.) Otherwise, any Canadian FA has already appeared as a TFA, so far as I can tell. I welcome others looking through the list, to see if I missed anything, though. -- Zanimum (talk) 15:48, 11 May 2017 (UTC)
  • Support as co-editor. The only thing I would raise is I really love the photo of the bird perched on someone's head (See File:GrayJayonHead.jpg), which I think'd make a great mainpage pic Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 11:09, 19 May 2017 (UTC)
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