Wikipedia:Today's featured article/requests

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Here the community can nominate articles to be selected as "Today's featured article" (TFA) on the main page. The TFA section aims to highlight the range of articles that have "featured article" status, from Art and architecture through to Warfare, and wherever possible it tries to avoid similar topics appearing too close together without good reason. Requests are not the only factor in scheduling the TFA (see Choosing Today's Featured Article); the final decision rests with the TFA coordinators (Crisco 1492, Dank, Jimfbleak, and Mike Christie, who also select TFAs for dates where no suggestions are put forward). Please confine requests to this page, and remember that community endorsement on this page does not necessarily mean the article will appear on the requested date.

The rules for nominations are relatively simple:

  • The article must be a featured article.
  • The article must not have appeared as TFA before (see the list of possibilities here)
  • The request must be either for a specific date within the next 30 days that have not yet been scheduled (10 spaces), or a non-specific date (4 spaces). If a section is full, you can wait for a vacancy, or ask the coordinators for advice. The template [email protected]}} can be used in a message to "ping" the coordinators through the notification system.

If you have an exceptional request that deviates from these instructions (for example, an article making a second appearance as TFA, or a "double-header"), please discuss the matter with the TFA coordinators in the first instance.

It can be helpful to add the article to the pending requests template up to 1 year before the requested date. This does not guarantee selection, but does help others see what nominations may be forthcoming. Requestors should still nominate the article here during the 30-day timeframe.

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Featured content:

Today's featured article (TFA):

Featured article tools:


How to post a new nomination:

I.
Create the nomination subpage.

In the box below, enter the full name of the article you are nominating (without using any brackets around the article's name) and click the button to create your nomination page.


II.
Write the nomination.

On that nomination page, fill out as many of the relevant parts of the pre-loaded {{TFAR nom}} template as you can, then save the page.

Your nomination should mention:

  • when the last similar article was, since this helps towards diversity on the main page (browsing Wikipedia:Today's featured article/recent TFAs will help you find out);
  • when the article was promoted to FA status (since older articles may need extra checks);
  • and (for date-specific nominations) the article's relevance for the requested date.

You're welcome to create your own TFA text as a summary of the lead section, or you can ask for assistance at WT:TFAR. We use one paragraph only, with no reference tags or alternative names; the only thing bolded is the first link to the article title. The length when previewed (including spaces) is usually between 1025 and 1175 characters. Add a suitable free-use image if available; fair use images are not allowed.

III.
Post at TFAR.

After you have created the nomination page, add it here under a level-3 heading for the preferred date (or under a free non-specific date header). To do this, add (replacing "ARTICLE TITLE" with the name of your nominated article):
===February 29===
{{Wikipedia:Today's featured article/requests/ARTICLE TITLE}}

Nominations are ordered by requested date below the summary chart. More than one article can be nominated for the same date.

It would also then be helpful to add the nomination to the summary chart, following the examples there. Please include the name of the article that you are nominating in your edit summary.

If you are not one of the article's primary editors, please then notify the primary editors of the TFA nomination; if primary editors are no longer active, please add a message to the article talk page.

Scheduling:

In the absence of exceptional circumstances, TFAs are scheduled in date order, not according to how long nominations have been open or how many supportive comments they have. So, for example, January 31 will not be scheduled until January 30 has been scheduled (by TFAR nomination or otherwise).


Summary chart

Currently accepting requests from February 9 to March 11.

Date Article Notes Supports Opposes
Nonspecific 1 History of Norwich City F.C. 2 1
Nonspecific 2 Witchfinder General (film) 1 0
Nonspecific 3
Nonspecific 4
February 16 Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward 5th anniversary of release 3 0
February 27 Henry Hoʻolulu Pitman Anniversary of death 3 0
March 11 German–Yugoslav Partisan negotiations 74th anniversary of the commencement of negotiations 1 0

Tally may not be up to date. The nominator is included in the number of supporters.

Nonspecific date nominations

Nonspecific date 1

History of Norwich City F.C.

Celebration of victory in 2004

The history of Norwich City F.C. stretches back to 1902. After a brief period in amateur football, the club spent 15 years as a semi-professional team in the Southern League before admission to The Football League in 1920. For most of the next 50 years, Norwich City F.C. sat in Division Three (South), then the joint lowest tier of the football league, a period that was distinguished by "a thrilling giant-killing sequence which took them to the FA Cup semi-finals" in 1959. Shortly afterwards, the club won its first major trophy, the 1962 League Cup. Norwich finally reached the pinnacle of the league structure in 1972, with their first promotion to the top tier. Since then, Norwich City has acquired a reputation as a "yo-yo club", with 22 seasons in the top league and 15 in the second tier. During this period the club has achieved most of its greatest distinctions, claiming the League Cup in 1985, reaching two more FA Cup semi finals, 1989 and 1992, finishing fifth, fourth and third in the top division and beating Bayern Munich in the UEFA Cup. In the course of its history, Norwich City has survived a number of incidents that threatened its survival, including financial crises. (Full article...)

  • Most recent similar article(s): 16 October
  • Main editors: Dweller
  • Promoted: 2008
  • Reasons for nomination:
  • Support as nominator. Gerda Arendt (talk) 22:31, 5 November 2016 (UTC)
  • Support ...it's football season in UK...Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 00:32, 8 November 2016 (UTC)
  • Oppose. Has neither of you read the article before supporting? This was promoted back when the FA standards were very different, and hasn't been maintained for some years (the fact that it ends with discussion of the forthcoming 2015 season should surely be a clue), and is packed with unsourced statements and obvious omissions. (Which country is this team from, for instance? It's not reasonable to expect readers to have a clue where Norwich is. Who is their current manager, and when was he appointed? Why are there no notable players mentioned after 2006?) ‑ Iridescent 20:14, 10 November 2016 (UTC)
Oops, ok. fixing time....Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 19:43, 11 November 2016 (UTC)

I can take a look when I get a minute. We'll need to avoid/remove recentism, as that's often the most serious issue in these "History of" type articles. --Dweller (talk) Become old fashioned! 16:47, 14 November 2016 (UTC)

Unusually, I'd say the problem in this particular case is the opposite; aside from a bit of gloating about results over Ipswich, it has virtually no additions since you stopped working on it, so just kind of fizzles out somewhere around Gunn's sacking. (No mention of Ed Balls, for instance, who aside from the sainted Delia is probably the only person associated with NCFC 99.9% of readers have ever heard of.) ‑ Iridescent 17:49, 14 November 2016 (UTC)
I can fix that, but it is suffering from recentism. The last 16 years dominates the article. I'll get stuck in. --Dweller (talk) Become old fashioned! 14:17, 15 November 2016 (UTC)
Dweller, Iridescent, Cas, Gerda: what's the status on this? I've scheduled up to 10 January and was considering this for 11 January. The article history shows a few edits after the last comment above, but it also includes a comment that more work might be needed. Mike Christie (talk - contribs - library) 12:49, 23 December 2016 (UTC)
Paging The Rambling Man, as if it's not up to scratch any complaint is most likely to come from him. The "comes to a grinding halt two years ago" issue has been fixed, but at the time of writing I still see six "citation needed" tags (although it looks like most of those can be fairly easily fixed). ‑ Iridescent 15:13, 23 December 2016 (UTC)

Nonspecific date 2

Witchfinder General (film)

Previous nomination

This nomination predates the introduction in April 2014 of article-specific subpages for nominations and has been created from the edit history of Wikipedia:Today's featured article/requests.

This is the archived discussion of the TFAR nomination for the article below. Subsequent comments should be made on the appropriate discussion page (such as Wikipedia talk:Today's featured article/requests). Please do not modify this page unless you are renominating the article at TFAR. For renominations, please add {{collapse top|Previous nomination}} to the top of the discussion and {{collapse bottom}} at the bottom, then complete a new nomination underneath. To do this, see the instructions at {{TFAR nom/doc}}.

The result was: not scheduled by BencherliteTalk 16:23, 17 October 2013‎ (UTC)

Vincent Price

Witchfinder General is a 1968 British horror film directed by Michael Reeves and starring Vincent Price (pictured), Ian Ogilvy, and Hilary Dwyer. The screenplay was by Reeves and Tom Baker based on Ronald Bassett's novel of the same name. A low-budget film of under £100,000, the story details the heavily fictionalised murderous witch-hunting exploits of Matthew Hopkins, a 17th-century English lawyer who claimed to have been appointed as a "Witch Finder Generall" by Parliament during the English Civil War to root out sorcery and witchcraft. The film was retitled The Conqueror Worm in the United States in an attempt to link it with an earlier series of Edgar Allan Poe-related films starring Price. Reeves featured many scenes of intense torture and violence that were considered unusually sadistic at the time. Upon its theatrical release in 1968, the movie's gruesome content was met with disgust by several film critics in the UK. In the US, the film was shown virtually intact and was a box office success, but it was almost completely ignored by reviewers. The movie eventually developed into a cult film and it was named the 15th greatest horror film of all time. (Full article...)

I'm nominating this on behalf of Hal Raglan, with his consent, as an option for Halloween. This article was promoted to FA in 2006 and looks to be in good shape for an older FA. Unless my calcuations are off, this should receive at least 3 points: 1 for date connection (horror film on Halloween) and 2 points for age (promoted two or more years ago). Imzadi 1979  01:10, 3 October 2013 (UTC)

  • Comment POTD on 31 October will also be about a film (poster from the 1932 film The Mummy); this has been scheduled since June. I don't mind having both run at the same time, but the TFA delegate should be aware. — Crisco 1492 (talk) 07:01, 3 October 2013 (UTC)
  • Comment Checklinks found three dead links so I tagged two and fixed one. One of them is File:Cry of the Banshee.jpg, which was deleted at the beginning of the year, so the original source for this could be used instead. Edgepedia (talk) 19:17, 12 October 2013 (UTC)
  • Comment. Given it's a British film, the word "movie" should be removed from the blurb (and also the article). Espresso Addict (talk) 14:20, 13 October 2013 (UTC)

As this one hasn't so far got much in the way of comments on its date suitability, does anyone have any alternative suggestions for a 31st October TFA? We have a few bat articles, though we're lacking in ones with decent images; Malkin Tower has just passed FAC (but I doubt Eric Corbett will thank me for mentioning it here in this context); or we could run a non-Hallowe'en article for a change, either Sea or something else. Thoughts? BencherliteTalk 19:04, 14 October 2013 (UTC)

Malkin Tower was a joint effort with BigDom and Trappedinburnley, so I wouldn't stand in the way of it being featured on Halloween. I think it might be a reasonable choice in fact. Eric Corbett 19:19, 14 October 2013 (UTC)
(e/c) I'll ping them: @Trappedinburnley: and @BigDom:... Your thoughts? It would make a change from horror films (which we've had the last couple of years) and contrast with the POTD too. BencherliteTalk 19:24, 14 October 2013 (UTC)
Sounds good to me. BigDom (talk) 22:29, 14 October 2013 (UTC)
Me too. Anything I can do to improve its chances? --Trappedinburnley (talk) 17:39, 16 October 2013 (UTC)
<!
Vincent Price

Witchfinder General is a 1968 British horror film directed by Michael Reeves and starring Vincent Price (pictured), Ian Ogilvy, and Hilary Dwyer. The screenplay was by Reeves and Tom Baker based on Ronald Bassett's novel of the same name. A low-budget film of under £100,000, the story details the heavily fictionalised murderous witch-hunting exploits of Matthew Hopkins, a 17th-century English lawyer who claimed to have been appointed as a "Witch Finder Generall" by Parliament during the English Civil War to root out sorcery and witchcraft. The film was retitled The Conqueror Worm in the United States in an attempt to link it with an earlier series of Edgar Allan Poe-related films starring Price. Reeves featured many scenes of intense torture and violence that were considered unusually sadistic at the time. Upon its theatrical release in 1968, the movie's gruesome content was met with disgust by several film critics in the UK. In the US, the film was shown virtually intact and was a box office success, but it was almost completely ignored by reviewers. The movie eventually developed into a cult film and it was named the 15th greatest horror film of all time. (Full article...)

  • Most recent similar article(s): Star Trek: First Contact November 22, 2016
  • Main editors: Hal Raglan
  • Promoted: October 1, 2006
  • Reasons for nomination: Non specific date request. I'm nominating this as it looks in good shape and is (by nature of its age) a different topic from one commonly seen recently. Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 11:29, 22 November 2016 (UTC)
  • Wait - A 2006 promotion and while it is quite well written, I'm seeing sources such as Video Watchblog, DVD Maniacs and DVD Drive-In. Suggest a run through FAR before main page. Ceoil (talk) 15:03, 27 November 2016 (UTC)
  • Ok good point. I was sloppy and didn't notice this. Best to can this. Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 10:33, 7 January 2017 (UTC) Just realized I might be able to replace/update some sources, so give me a few days more... Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 20:40, 9 January 2017 (UTC)
Gimme a week to see if I can find something. Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 18:35, 17 January 2017 (UTC)

Nonspecific date 3

Nonspecific date 4

Specific date nominations

February 16

Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward

Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward is a visual novel adventure video game developed by Chunsoft. The second installment in the Zero Escape series, it was released in 2012 for the Nintendo 3DS and PlayStation Vita. The story follows the player character Sigma, a man who is abducted and forced along with eight other individuals to play the Nonary Game, which puts its participants in a life-or-death situation. As the story progresses, the characters begin to unravel the secrets behind the Nonary Game, as well as its true purpose. The game was developed as a result of the unexpected critical success that its predecessor, Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors, received in North America. Game director Kotaro Uchikoshi wrote the script, which was then localized by Aksys Games and Rising Star Games for North America and Europe respectively. Virtue's Last Reward was released to positive reviews. Critics praised the story and characters, but were divided in their opinions of the escape-the-room sections. Despite positive reviews, the game was a commercial failure in Japan, which led to the temporary cancellation of its sequel. Development on the sequel eventually resumed, and Zero Time Dilemma was released in 2016. (Full article...)

  • Most recent similar article(s): November 16, 2016 Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines
  • Main editors: Famous Hobo
  • Promoted: September 29, 2016
  • Reasons for nomination: 5th Anniversary of release
  • Support as nominator. Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 10:30, 7 January 2017 (UTC)
  • Support as one of the main editors (IDV and ThomasO1989 were also major editors). However, the blurb needs to be fixed. It currently doesn't mention the gameplay, which I guess is fine since it's a story driven game anyway, but without mentioning the gameplay, the reception sentence won't make sense. The reader won't know what Escape sections are, which are an important gameplay mechanic. Also, if we're talking about recent similar TFAs, Defense of the Ancients on January 5 was a video game article.Famous Hobo (talk) 11:40, 7 January 2017 (UTC)
Feel free to rejig the blurb to add and subtract elements. It was late here and I just made a rough cut to get it here, so it can be fine-tuned. Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 21:59, 7 January 2017 (UTC)
Replaced it with escape-the-room.--IDVtalk 19:51, 9 January 2017 (UTC)
  • Support though I do agree with Casliber that the Escape sections should be defined in some way if possible for an unfamiliar reader as the reference to them in the reception section would not make much sense. I can get a vague idea from the plot summary, but maybe a little more information would be beneficial. Aoba47 (talk) 17:30, 9 January 2017 (UTC)
  • Question I am not familiar with TFA - are there any criteria that need to be followed beyond what little is on WP:TFA? Also, regarding images, is File:VLR logo.png fine?--IDVtalk 20:37, 9 January 2017 (UTC)

February 27

Henry Hoʻolulu Pitman

Portrait of Henry Hoʻolulu Pitman

Henry Hoʻolulu Pitman (1845–1863) was among a group of more than one hundred Native Hawaiian and Hawaii-born combatants who fought in the American Civil War while the Kingdom of Hawaii was still an independent nation. Born in Hilo, Hawaii, to a merchant from Massachusetts and Hawaiian chiefess Kinoʻoleoliliha, he accompanied his father back to the United States for his education. He ran away from school without his family's knowledge and enlisted in the Union Army, as a private. Despite his mixed-race ancestry, he avoided the racial segregation imposed on other Hawaiian recruits of the time and was assigned to a white regiment. He fought in the Battle of Antietam and the Maryland Campaign and befriended later Civil War historian Robert G. Carter. On the march to Fredericksburg, he was separated from his regiment and captured by Confederate guerrilla forces. He was marched to Richmond and incarcerated in Libby Prison, where he contracted "lung fever" from the harsh conditions of his imprisonment and died on February 27, 1863, a few months after his release on parole in a prisoner exchange. Modern historians consider Henry Hoʻolulu Pitman to be the only known Hawaiian or Pacific Islander to die as a prisoner of war in the Civil War. The legacy of Pitman and other Hawaiian combatants has sparked renewed interest in the role Hawaiians played during the American Civil War. (Full article...)

  • Most recent similar article(s): Richard Dannatt
  • Main editors: KAVEBEAR
  • Promoted: July 18, 2016
  • Reasons for nomination: February 27 is the anniversary of his death date. February 27 is the anniversary of the day he died
  • Support as nominator. KAVEBEAR (talk) 04:13, 14 January 2017 (UTC)
  • Support, although I would recommend the reason be changed to "February 27 is the anniversary of the day he died". Iazyges Consermonor Opus meum 12:56, 17 January 2017 (UTC)
  • Support Besides the article, the image is also of good quality for the main page. — Maile (talk) 17:38, 18 January 2017 (UTC)

March 11

German–Yugoslav Partisan negotiations

Milovan Đilas was the chief Partisan negotiator.

The German–Yugoslav Partisan negotiations were held between German commanders and the Yugoslav Partisans in March 1943 during World War II. The negotiations – focused on obtaining a ceasefire and establishing a prisoner exchange – were conducted during an Axis offensive. They were used by the Partisans to delay the Axis forces while the Partisans crossed the Neretva river, and to allow the Partisans to focus on attacking their Chetnik rivals led by Draža Mihailović. They were accompanied by an informal ceasefire that lasted about six weeks before being called off by Adolf Hitler. The advantage gained by the Partisans was lost when another Axis offensive was launched in mid-May 1943. Although aspects of the negotiations were published in several languages from 1949 onwards, the key Partisan negotiator was not named until 1973. Subsequently, accounts of the negotiations were published by Yugoslav historians and the main Yugoslav protagonists. (Full article...)

  • Most recent similar article(s): This is a Yugoslavia in World War II article. The last Yugoslav-related TFA was on December 15, 2016, but that was a warship article. The last wars, battles and events article was on September 19, 2016 but that was a Napoleonic Wars article.
  • Main editors: Peacemaker67
  • Promoted: March 24, 2015
  • Reasons for nomination: 74th anniversary of the commencement of negotiations
  • Support as nominator. Peacemaker67 (click to talk to me) 04:16, 26 December 2016 (UTC)
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