Wikipedia:Today's featured article/February 2017

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February 1
Shannen Doherty

Love, Inc. is an American television sitcom that originally aired for one season on United Paramount Network (UPN) from September 22, 2005, to May 11, 2006. Originally envisioned as a vehicle for Shannen Doherty (pictured), the series featured an ensemble cast led by Busy Philipps, Vince Vieluf, Reagan Gomez-Preston, Ion Overman, and Holly Robinson Peete as five matchmakers working at a dating agency. It suffered from low viewership despite its high ratings among young Hispanic women; it was canceled following UPN's merger with the WB to launch the CW in 2006. The series' cancellation, along with that of other black sitcoms, was criticized by media outlets for reducing representation of African American characters and the number of roles for African American actors on television. Critical response to Love, Inc. was mixed: some praised its multi-ethnic cast, while others felt that the storylines and characters were unoriginal and that Philipps' portrayal of her character was unsympathetic. (Full article...)


February 2
Suillus salmonicolor 167980.jpg

Suillus salmonicolor, commonly known as the slippery Jill, is a fungus in the family Suillaceae of the order Boletales. First described as a member of the genus Boletus in 1874, the species acquired several synonyms, including Suillus pinorigidus and Suillus subluteus, before it was assigned its current binomial name in 1983. It has not been determined with certainty whether S. salmonicolor is distinct from the species S. cothurnatus, described by Rolf Singer in 1945. S. salmonicolor is a mycorrhizal fungus—meaning it forms a symbiotic association with the roots of plants such that both organisms benefit from the exchange of nutrients. This symbiosis occurs with various species of pine, and the fruit bodies (or mushrooms) of the fungus appear scattered or in groups on the ground near the trees. The fungus is found in North America (including Hawaii), Asia, the Caribbean, South Africa, Australia and Central America. It has been introduced to several of those locations via transplanted trees. The mushroom's dingy yellow to brownish cap is rounded to flattened in shape, slimy when wet, and grows up to 9.5 cm (3.7 in) wide. The small pores on the underside of the cap are yellow before becoming olive-brown. The stem is up to 10 cm (3.9 in) long and 1.6 cm (0.6 in) thick and is covered with reddish-brown glandular dots. Young specimens are covered with a grayish, slimy partial veil that later ruptures and leaves a sheathlike ring on the stem. Although the mushroom is generally considered edible—especially if the slimy cap cuticle and partial veil are first peeled off—opinions about its palatability vary. Other similar Suillus species include S. acidus, S. subalutaceus, and S. intermedius.

(Full article...)


February 3
Affection in wheelchair.jpeg

Although spinal cord injury (SCI) often causes sexual dysfunction, many people with SCI are able to have satisfying sex lives. Physical limitations acquired from SCI affect sexual function and sexuality in broader areas, which in turn has important effects on quality of life. Damage to the spinal cord impairs its ability to transmit messages between the brain and parts of the body below the level of the lesion. This results in lost or reduced sensation and muscle motion, and affects orgasm, erection, ejaculation, and vaginal lubrication. More indirect causes of sexual dysfunction include pain, weakness, and side effects of medications. Psycho-social causes include depression and altered self-image. However, many people with SCI have satisfying sex lives, and many experience sexual arousal and orgasm. People with SCI employ a variety of adaptations to help carry on their sex lives healthily, by focusing on different areas of the body and types of sexual acts. Neural plasticity may account for increases in sensitivity in parts of the body that have not lost sensation, so people often find newly sensitive erotic areas of the skin in erogenous zones or near borders between areas of preserved and lost sensation. Drugs, devices, surgery, and other interventions exist to help men achieve erection and ejaculation. Although male fertility is reduced, many men with SCI can still father children, particularly with medical interventions. Women's fertility is not usually affected, although precautions must be taken for safe pregnancy and delivery. People with SCI need to take measures during sexual activity to deal with SCI effects such as weakness and movement limitations, and to avoid injuries such as skin damage in areas of reduced sensation. Education and counseling about sexuality is an important part of SCI rehabilitation but is often missing or insufficient. Rehabilitation for children and adolescents aims to promote healthy development of sexuality and includes education for them and their families. Culturally inherited biases and stereotypes negatively affect people with SCI, particularly when held by professional caregivers. Body image and other insecurities affect sexual function, and have profound repercussions on self-esteem and self-concept. SCI causes difficulties in romantic partnerships, due to problems with sexual function and to other stresses introduced by the injury and disability, but many of those with SCI have fulfilling relationships and marriages. Relationships, self-esteem, and reproductive ability are all aspects of sexuality, which encompasses not just sexual practices but a complex array of factors: cultural, social, psychological, and emotional influences. (Full article...)


February 4
Cosplayer

Allen Walker (Japanese: アレン・ウォーカー Hepburn: Aren Wōkā?) is a fictional character who appears as the protagonist of the manga D.Gray-man by Katsura Hoshino. He is also the protagonist of its two anime adaptations, D.Gray-man and its sequel D.Gray-man Hallow, and has appeared in three light novels, two video games, and several crossover fighting games. In the series, set on 19th-century Earth, Allen Walker is a teenager who joins the Black Order, a group of soldiers known as Exorcists. As an Exorcist, Allen is able to use a mysterious object known as Innocence to fight demons known as Akuma. Allen's Innocence takes the form of a giant left arm initially, but evolves over time and gives him new abilities. Over the course of the series, Allen uses these powers to fight the Millennium Earl, who created the army of Akuma to destroy the world, and his super-human followers, the Noah Family. During his adventures, Allen learns he is connected to the Noah and might turn into one of them. Hoshino based Allen's character design on Robin, the shorter-haired female protagonist of her one-shot comic titled Zone. She designed Allen's clothing to resemble nineteenth-century outfits, and gave him a ribbon tie and other accessories to make him look gentlemanly. She also gave him a scar in the shape of a pentagram to project a scary-looking image, and a calm demeanor different from her typical rambunctious and rude characters. In the anime television series and related franchise, Allen was voiced by Sanae Kobayashi. In 2016, for the new television anime series D.Gray-man Hallow, the voice parts were recast and Ayumu Murase replaced Kobayashi. In the English adaptation of the anime series, Allen has been voiced by Todd Haberkorn. Allen has been very popular with D.Gray-man readers, usually ranking in the top three in the series' popularity polls. Reactions to him have also been generally positive in manga and anime publications and other media. His character design has been highly praised, critics noting characteristics atypical of a shōnen protagonist, such as his calm demeanor and mysterious origin. Some reviewers also enjoyed the work of Allen's multiple voice actors. Several pieces of merchandise have been released with Allen's likeness, including plush dolls and figurines, as well as clothing and cosplay pieces.

(Full article...)


February 5
HMS Furious plus another

The Courageous class was the first multi-ship class of aircraft carriers to serve with the Royal Navy. The three ships—Furious, Courageous and Glorious—were originally laid down as "large light cruisers" (battlecruisers) to be used in the Baltic Project during the First World War. While very fast, their minimal armour and few guns limited their long-term utility in the post-war Royal Navy and they were laid up after the war. They were considered capital ships by the terms of the 1922 Washington Naval Treaty and were included in the total amount of tonnage allowed to the Royal Navy. Rather than scrap them, the Navy decided to convert them to aircraft carriers as permitted under the Treaty. Furious, already partially converted during the war, began her reconstruction in 1921, before the Treaty came into effect. In attempt to minimize air turbulence she was given no superstructure or "island". This was not entirely satisfactory and a small island was added in 1939. Another problem was that she lacked a standard funnel; instead, her boiler uptakes ran along the sides of the ship and exhausted out of gratings on the rear of the flight deck, or the sides of the ship if landing operations were in progress. The long ducts reduced her aircraft capacity and the exhaust gases were as much of a problem for landing aircraft as the turbulence would have been. Her half-sisters, Courageous and Glorious, began their conversions to aircraft carriers as Furious neared completion. They drew upon the experience gained by the Royal Navy since Furious had been designed and incorporated an island with a funnel, increasing their aircraft capacity by one-third and making it safer to land. As the first large, or "fleet", carrier completed by the Royal Navy, Furious was extensively used to evaluate aircraft handling and landing procedures, including the first-ever carrier night landing in 1926. Courageous became the first warship lost by the Royal Navy in the Second World War when she was torpedoed in September 1939 by a German submarine. Glorious unsuccessfully hunted the German cruiser Admiral Graf Spee in the Indian Ocean in 1939. She participated in the Norwegian Campaign in 1940, but was sunk by two German battleships in June when she was unwisely allowed to sail home with minimal escort. Furious spent the first months of the war hunting for German raiders and escorting convoys before she began to support British forces in Norway. She spent most of 1940 in Norwegian waters making attacks on German installations and shipping, and most of 1941 ferrying aircraft to West Africa, Gibraltar and Malta before refitting in the United States. She ferried aircraft to Malta as part of the Malta Convoys during 1942 and provided air support to British forces during Operation Torch. Furious spent most of 1943 training with the Home Fleet, but made numerous air strikes against the German battleship Tirpitz and other targets in Norway in 1944. The old ship was worn out by late 1944, so she was reduced to reserve status in September before being paid off in 1945 and sold for scrap in 1948.


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Part of the Courageous-class battlecruisers series, one of Wikipedia's featured topics.


February 6
Clint Haliax d.jpg

Cliff Clinkscales (born 1984) is an American professional basketball player for the Halifax Hurricanes of the National Basketball League of Canada. He was named an NBL Canada All-Star in 2014 and won the league championship in 2016. He competed with the DePaul Blue Demons at the collegiate level, leading NCAA Division I in assist-to-turnover ratio as a senior. A native of Jamaica, Queens, he first attended Springfield Gardens High School in New York City but began playing high school basketball at Shores Christian Academy in Ocala, Florida. When Clinkscales was in fifth grade, coaches noticed him dribbling at a local basketball camp. As a result, he joined the national spotlight, appearing on national TV and receiving recruitment letters from the Kansas Jayhawks and USC Trojans.

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February 7
Johnson Creek2.JPG

Johnson Creek is a 25-mile (40 km) tributary of the Willamette River in the Portland metropolitan area of the U.S. state of Oregon. Part of the drainage basin of the Columbia River, its watershed consists of 54 square miles (140 km2) of mostly urban land occupied by about 180,000 people as of 2012. Passing through the cities of Gresham, Portland, and Milwaukie, the creek flows generally west from the foothills of the Cascade Range through sediments deposited by glacial floods on a substrate of basalt. Though polluted, it is free-flowing along its main stem and provides habitat for salmon and other migrating fish.

Prior to European settlement, the watershed was heavily forested and was used by Native Americans of the Chinook band for fishing and hunting. In the 19th century, white settlers cleared much of the land for farming, and the stream is named for one of these newcomers, William Johnson, who in 1846 built a water-powered sawmill along the creek. By the early 20th century, a rail line parallel to the stream encouraged further residential and commercial development. As urban density increased in the floodplain, seasonal floods grew more damaging. In the 1930s the Works Progress Administration of the federal government lined the lower 15 miles (24 km) of Johnson Creek with rock to control the floods. Despite this, the creek flooded 37 times between 1941 and 2006. Since the 1990s, regional planners have tried to reduce flooding by controlling stormwater runoff, creating stream meanders, reducing erosion, replacing impervious surfaces, and protecting riparian buffers.

The Johnson Creek watershed includes the subwatersheds of Badger Creek, Sunshine Creek, Kelley Creek, Mitchell Creek, Veterans Creek, Crystal Springs Creek, and smaller streams. Parks along the creek and its tributaries include natural areas, a wildlife refuge, a rhododendron garden, a botanical garden, and a 21-mile (34 km) bicycle and pedestrian rail trail that follows the creek for much of its length. (Full article...)


February 8
Doris Lessing

The Good Terrorist is a 1985 political novel by Doris Lessing. It was first published in September 1985 in the United Kingdom by Jonathan Cape, and in the United States by Alfred A. Knopf. The story examines events in the life of Alice, a naïve and well-intentioned squatter, who moves in with a group of radicals in London, and is drawn into their terrorist activities. Lessing was inspired to write The Good Terrorist by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) bombing of the Harrods department store in London in 1983. She had been a member of the British Communist Party in the early 1950s, but later grew disillusioned with communism. Three reviewers labelled The Good Terrorist as a satire, while Lessing called it humorous. Some critics called the novel's title an oxymoron, stating that it highlights Alice's ambivalent nature, and that she is neither a good person, nor a good revolutionary. The Good Terrorist divided reviewers, with some being impressed by the book's insight and characterization, and others complaining about the novel's style and the character's lack of depth. One critic complimented Lessing's "strong descriptive prose and her precise and realistic characterizations", but another called the book's text "surprisingly bland", and described the characters as "trivial or two-dimensional or crippled by self-delusions". The Good Terrorist was shortlisted for the Booker Prize, and won the Mondello Prize and the WH Smith Literary Award. (Full article...)


February 9
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February 10
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February 11
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February 12
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February 13
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February 14
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February 15
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February 16
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February 17
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February 18
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February 19
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February 20
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February 21
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February 22
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February 23
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February 24
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February 25
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February 26
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February 27
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February 28
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