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Wikipedia:Today's featured article

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Today's featured article

This star symbolizes the featured content on Wikipedia.

At the top of the Main Page, a summarized lead section from one of Wikipedia's featured articles is displayed as "Today's featured article" (TFA). The current month's queue can be found here. TFAs are scheduled by the TFA coordinators, Crisco 1492 (Chris), Dank (Dan), Jimfbleak, and Mike Christie. Community discussion of suggestions takes place at the TFA requests page.

If you notice an error in a future TFA summary, you're welcome to fix it yourself, but if the mistake is in today's or tomorrow's summary, you can leave a message at WP:ERRORS to ask an administrator to fix it. The summaries are formatted as a single paragraph of around 1,150 characters (including spaces), with no reference tags or alternative names. Only the link to the specified featured article is bolded, and this must be the first link. The summary should be preceded by an appropriate image when available; fair use images are not allowed.

The editnotice template for Today's Featured Article is {{TFA-editnotice}}. It is automatically applied by {{Editnotices/Namespace/Main}} when the article's title matches the contents of {{TFA title}}. To contact the TFA coordinators, please leave a message on the TFA talk page, or type "{{@TFA}}" in a signed comment on any talk page.

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Today's featured article

A 19th-century photograph of the Dorset Ooser

The Dorset Ooser is a wooden head that featured in the nineteenth-century folk culture of Melbury Osmond, a village in the southwestern English county of Dorset. The head was hollow, thus perhaps serving as a mask, and included a humanoid face with horns, a beard, and a hinged jaw. Although sometimes used to scare people during practical jokes, its main recorded purpose was as part of a local variant of the custom known as "rough music", in which it was used to humiliate those who were deemed to have behaved in an immoral manner. It was first brought to public attention in 1891, when it was owned by the Cave family of Melbury Osmond's Holt Farm, but it went missing around 1897. In 1975 a replica of the original Ooser was produced by John Byfleet, which has since been on display at Dorset County Museum in Dorchester. This mask retains a place in Dorset folk culture, and is used in local Morris dancing processions held by the Wessex Morris Men on Saint George's Day and May Day. The design of the Ooser has inspired copies used as representations of the Horned God in the modern Pagan religion of Wicca in both the United Kingdom and United States. (Full article...)

Tomorrow's featured article

Logo of Plaza Sésamo, a Mexican co-production
Logo of Plaza Sésamo, a Mexican co-production

Sesame Street international co-productions are educational children's television series based on the American Sesame Street but tailored to the countries in which they are produced. Shortly after the debut of Sesame Street in the US in 1969, television producers, teachers, and officials of several countries approached the show's producers and the executives of Children's Television Workshop (CTW) about the possibility of airing international versions of the show. Creator Joan Ganz Cooney hired former CBS executive Mike Dann to field offers to produce versions of the show in other countries, with original sets, characters, and curriculum goals. CTW's new shows included both dubbed versions of the American show and versions created, developed, and produced to reflect each country's needs, educational priorities, and culture. For example, the first HIV-positive Muppet, Kami, from the South African co-production Takalani Sesame, was created in 2003 to address the epidemic of AIDS. In 2001, there were more than 120 million viewers of all international versions of Sesame Street, and by the US show's 40th anniversary in 2009, they were being seen in more than 140 countries. (Full article...)

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