Wikipedia:Picture of the day/May 2010

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search


Featured content:

Featured picture tools:

A monthly archive of Wikipedia's featured pictures



These featured pictures previously appeared (or shall appear) as Picture of the day as scheduled below. You can add the automatically updating Picture of the day to your userpage or talk page using {{pic of the day}} (text version) or {{POTD}} (short version). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.


Purge server cache


May 1 - Sat

Barnum & Bailey Circus poster
A poster from 1900 for the Barnum & Bailey Circus, an American circus company founded by James Anthony Bailey and P. T. Barnum, who both had separate circus companies that merged in 1881. After Barnum's death in 1891, Bailey became the sole owner. When Bailey himself died in 1905, the circus was purchased by the Ringling brothers, who ran the competing Ringling Brothers Circus. In 1919, the two companies merged and continue to perform today as the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus.Poster: Strobridge Litho. Co.; Restoration: Lise Broer

view - edit - protected version

May 2 - Sun

Volume rendering of mouse skull
An animated volume rendering of a mouse skull using the shear warp technique. In computer graphics, volume rendering is the process of creating a two-dimensional projection of a three-dimensional discretely sampled data set. This image uses a series of CT scans of the skull. Direct volume rendering is a computationally intensive task that may be performed in several ways.Image credit: Christian Lackas

view - edit - protected version

May 3 - Mon

Methods of lighting through the ages
An illustration from Volume IV (E–G) of the encyclopedia Nouveau Larousse illustré showing various methods of lighting through the ages, starting from prehistoric times in the upper left (No. 1) to carbide lamps at the beginning of the 20th century (No. 54, lower right), with a separate section for Japanese lighting (No. 55–58, lower left).Illustration: Maurice Dessertenne
Restoration: Michel Vuijlsteke

view - edit - protected version

May 4 - Tue

Southern Crowned Pigeon
The Southern Crowned Pigeon (Goura scheepmakeri) is a large, approximately 75 cm (30 in) long, terrestrial pigeon confined to southern lowland forests of New Guinea. It has a bluish-grey plumage with elaborate blue lacy crests, red iris and very deep maroon breast. Both sexes are similar. It also looks very similar to its relatives, the Victoria Crowned Pigeon, and the Western Crowned Pigeon.Photo: Luc Viatour

view - edit - protected version

May 5 - Wed

Nectarine and cross-section
A white nectarine and the cross-section of another. Nectarines are the fruit of a cultivar group of the peach (Prunus persica) whose peel is smooth instead of velvety. They are often erroneously believed to be a hybrid between peaches and plums. Nectarines are created due to a recessive gene, whereas a fuzzy peach skin is dominant.Photo: Fir0002

view - edit - protected version

May 6 - Thu

Missing square puzzle
An animated image depicting a variation of the missing square puzzle. In it, four quadrilaterals and a small square together form a larger square. When the quadrilaterals are rotated about their centers they fill the space of the small square, although the total area of the figure seems unchanged during the process.Image: Joaquim Alves Gaspar

view - edit - protected version

May 7 - Fri

The Winter's Tale, Act II, Scene 3
An illustration for Act II, Scene 3 of William Shakespeare's play The Winter's Tale, which recounts the story of Leontes, King of Sicilia, who becomes convinced that his wife Hermione and his childhood friend Polixenes have committed adultery and have borne an illegitimate daughter. The plot was taken from Robert Greene's Pandosto, but given a happy ending instead.Engraver: J. P. Simon; Artist: John Opie
Restoration: Adam Cuerden

view - edit - protected version

May 8 - Sat

Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin at Yalta
Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Joseph Stalin sitting together at the Yalta Conference, which took place February 4–11, 1945. The so-called "Big Three" met to discuss the re-establishment of the nations of Europe following World War II. Although a number of agreements were reached, Stalin broke his promises regarding Poland, and the Soviet Union annexed the regions of Eastern Europe it controlled, or converted them to satellite states.Photo: U.S. Army Signal Corps

view - edit - protected version

May 9 - Sun

Eastern billabong fly
The Eastern billabong fly (Austroagrion watsoni) is a member of the largest damselfly family Coenagrionidae, commonly called the narrow-winged or the pond damselflies. The Coenagrionidae enjoy a worldwide distribution, and with over 1,100 species in 90 genera, are among the most common of damselfly families.Photo: Noodle snacks

view - edit - protected version

May 10 - Mon

Scalping victim
A photo of a man named Robert McGee, showing effects of his having been scalped as a child. The act of scalping is the removal of a person's scalp or a portion thereof. Although it is associated with Native American tribes, contrary to popular belief it was far from universally practiced, and in fact was done by natives, colonists, and frontiersmen over centuries of violent conflict.Photo: E. E. Henry; Restoration: Michel Vuijlsteke

view - edit - protected version

May 11 - Tue

Turbot
The turbot (Psetta maxima) is a large (up to 100 cm or 39 in long and 25 kg or 55 lb in weight) species of flatfish native to the North Atlantic, Black Sea, Baltic Sea and the Mediterranean Sea. It is highly prized as a food fish and is acquired through aquaculture and trawling.Photo: Luc Viatour

view - edit - protected version

May 12 - Wed

Jerusalem in the early 20th century
A view of Jerusalem in the early 20th century. The earliest verified reference to the city is in the Amarna letters, which date to the 14th century BCE. Over its long history, it has been controlled by Israelites, Judaeans, Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Hasmoneans, Romans, Byzantines, Arabs, Mamluks, Turks, and the British before being split between Israel and Jordan. Israel captured East Jerusalem in the Six-Day War of 1967, and the city remains a core issue in the Israeli–Palestinian conflict.Photo: American Colony; Restoration: L. Broer/J. Wartenberg

view - edit - protected version

May 13 - Thu

BMW Welt
BMW Welt ("BMW World") is an event forum and conference center in Munich, Germany, owned by the automobile manufacturer BMW. Located in direct proximity to BMW Headquarters and Olympiapark, BMW Welt is also a distribution center for BMW vehicles.Photo: Richard Bartz

view - edit - protected version

May 14 - Fri

Ed Walsh
Ed Walsh (1881–1959) was an American baseball pitcher who played for the Chicago White Sox and Boston Braves from 1904 to 1917. His career earned run average of 1.82 is the lowest major league ERA ever posted, but the record is unofficial since ERA was not an official statistic in the American League prior to 1913. After his playing career ended, he also served as an umpire and coach.Photo: Paul Thompson
Restoration: Staxringold/Lise Broer

view - edit - protected version

May 15 - Sat

Ortahisar, Turkey
The town of Ortahisar in Cappadocia, a region in central Turkey famous for its fairy chimneys, rock formations that may reach 40 m (130 ft) in height. Over thousands of years, wind and rain have eroded layers of consolidated volcanic ash to form the area's landscape. Early occupants of the area dug tunnels into the exposed rock face to build residences, stores, and churches, now home to Byzantine artwork.Photo: Mila Zinkova

view - edit - protected version

May 16 - Sun

Anemone hupehensis
Anemone hupehensis var. japonica, a type of buttercup in the genus Anemone. Anemone hupehensis is commonly called the "Japanese anemone", but it is actually native to China. The flower's petals may be white, purple, or pink in color, with yellow stamens and green foliage. It produces three-parted leaves in clumps about 2 feet (0.61 m) wide. The plant may also be invasive or weedy in some areas, due to its tendency to spread quickly if left alone and the fact that it can survive in all but the hottest and driest conditions.Photo credit: Noodle snacks

view - edit - protected version

May 17 - Mon

Wicked Witch of the West
Dorothy (left) douses the Wicked Witch of the West with water, melting her, in this illustration from the first edition of L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. The appearance of the witch in the 1939 film adaptation of the novel has become an archetype for human wickedness. This film is the source of the oft-quoted phrase, "I'll get you, my pretty ... and your little dog too!" The unique Broadway musical, Wicked, The Untold Story Of the Witches of Oz, tells of The Wicked Witch of the West, the Tin Man, The Cowardly Lion, The Scarecrow, and Glinda's shared history.Illustrator: W. W. Denslow; Restoration: Lise Broer

view - edit - protected version

May 18 - Tue

Austroicetes vulgaris
Austroicetes vulgaris, a species of bandwing grasshopper. Bandwings are colorful, usually with hindwings that are yellow or red and edged with black. Others have black hindwings with pale edges, and a few species (including the most economically important ones) have clear ones.Photo: Noodle snacks

view - edit - protected version

May 19 - Wed

Troilus and Cressida Act V, scene 2
A scene from Act V, scene 2, of Troilus and Cressida, a tragedy by William Shakespeare set in the later years of the Trojan War. The eponymous Troilus and Cressida only feature in a small part of the play; the majority of the plot revolves around the leaders of the Greek and Trojan forces, Agamemnon and Priam.Engraver: L. Schiavonetti; Artist: A. Kauffman
Restoration: Fox

view - edit - protected version

May 20 - Thu

White-fronted Bee-eater
The White-fronted Bee-eater (Merops bullockoides) is a species of bee-eater widely distributed in sub-equatorial Africa. They have a distinctive white forehead, a square tail and a bright red patch on their throat. As the name suggests, their diet consists primarily of bees and other flying insects. They nest in colonies averaging 200 individuals, digging roosting and nesting holes in cliffs or banks of earth, and have a complex social structure.Photo: Luc Viatour

view - edit - protected version

May 21 - Fri

Leeds Castle
A panoramic view of Leeds Castle in Kent, England, from across the castle's moat. Built in 1119 by Robert de Crevecoeur to replace the earlier Saxon manor of Esledes, the castle became a royal palace for King Edward I of England and his queen, Eleanor of Castile, in 1278. Olive, Lady Baillie bought the castle in 1926 and redecorated it. After her death in 1974, the castle was given to the Leeds Castle Foundation for preservation, and then opened to the public in 1976.Photo credit: David Iliff

view - edit - protected version

May 22 - Sat

Men performing khitān on a boy
A group of Turkic men perform khitān, or male circumcision carried out as an Islamic rite, ca. 1865–72. Ritual circumcision is not mandated by the Qur'an, but serves to introduce males into the Islamic faith, and works as a sign of belonging to the wider Islamic community. However, it is not a condition for converting to Islam or carrying out religious duties.Photo: Unknown; Restoration: Lise Broer

view - edit - protected version

May 23 - Sun

New York Public Library reading room
A 90° view of the Rose Main Reading Room, located in the main branch of the New York Public Library, located in Midtown Manhattan. The NYPL is one of the largest public library systems in the United States and one of the largest research library systems in the world. It consists of 89 libraries: four non-lending research libraries, four main lending libraries, a library for the blind and physically challenged, and 77 neighborhood branch libraries in the three boroughs served.Photo: David Iliff

view - edit - protected version

May 24 - Mon

Brooklyn Bridge lithograph
An 1883 chromolithograph of the Brooklyn Bridge, which connects Manhattan Island to Brooklyn. It was the first land passage between the two boroughs. On its opening on May 24, 1883, it became the longest suspension bridge in the world and its towers the tallest structures in the Western Hemisphere. Twenty-seven people died during the construction of the $15.5-million bridge.Lithograph: Currier and Ives; Restoration: Lise Broer

view - edit - protected version

May 25 - Tue

Hakea laurina
Hakea laurina is a plant of Southwest Australia; the specific epithet, derived from the Latin laurus, is given for the resemblance to the leaves of laurel. The species is used in cultivation in the Eastern states of Australia, and as a hedging or street plant in America and Italy.Photo credit: Noodle snacks

view - edit - protected version

May 26 - Wed

Spotted Dove
The Spotted Dove (Streptopelia chinensis) is a long-tailed, slim pigeon native to tropical southern Asia, although it has since been introduced to many other countries, including the Philippines, Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand and the United States. It ranges from 28 to 32 cm (11 to 13 in) in length. Both sexes are similar in appearance.Photo credit: Noodle snacks

view - edit - protected version

May 27 - Thu

Cornelius Vanderbilt
Cornelius Vanderbilt (1794–1877) was an American entrepreneur who built his wealth in shipping and railroads and was the patriarch of the Vanderbilt family. He initially went into business as a steamship line operator, becoming so successful that he became known as "Commodore", despite never having served in the United States Navy. After the American Civil War, Vanderbilt sold all his ships, concentrating on railroads. His legacy includes the construction of New York City's Grand Central Terminal as well as a $1 million endowment to what is now known as Vanderbilt University, the largest charitable gift in American history to that date.Photo: Mathew Brady/Levin Handy; Restoration: Michel Vuijlsteke

view - edit - protected version

May 28 - Fri

Tachysphex species wasp
A wasp belonging to the genus Tachysphex, one of over 9,000 species in over 200 genera of the Crabronidae family. These numbers are expected to decrease as the subfamilies are likely to be reclassified as families in their own right in the future.Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim

view - edit - protected version

May 29 - Sat

Albino American Alligator
A rare albino American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), a resident of the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, California. Typically olive, brown, gray or nearly black in color, the species is native only to wetlands of the Southern United States. American Alligators are nearly twice as large as the other extant alligator species, the Chinese Alligator.Photo: Mila Zinkova

view - edit - protected version

May 30 - Sun

Polyporus squamosus
Polyporus squamosus, commonly known as "Dryad's saddle" and "Pheasant's back", is a basidiomycete bracket fungus found east of the Rocky Mountains in the United States and over much of Europe. Generally, the fruiting body is 8–30 cm (3.1–11.8 in) across, but can grow up to 60 cm (24 in). Although it is edible, it is generally not prized unless the specimens are very young and tender.Photo: Dan Molter

view - edit - protected version

May 31 - Mon

Le Cid Act III, Scene 6
Act III, Scene 6, from L'Illustration's coverage of the première of the tragicomic opera Le Cid. While the opera itself is not in the standard operatic repertory, the ballet suite is a popular concert piece and includes the famous Aragonaise.Image: Auguste Tilly; Restoration: Adam Cuerden

view - edit - protected version


Picture of the day archive



Today is Monday, October 22, 2018; it is now 13:23 UTC


Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Wikipedia:Picture_of_the_day/May_2010&oldid=637880246"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Picture_of_the_day/May_2010
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Wikipedia:Picture of the day/May 2010"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA