Wikipedia:Main Page queue

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Today

Featured article
June 19
Image of Hammond in cricket kit

Wally Hammond (19 June 1903 – 1 July 1965) was an English first-class cricketer, primarily a middle-order batsman, who played for Gloucestershire in a career that lasted from 1920 to 1951. Beginning as a professional, he later became an amateur and was appointed captain of England. Wisden Cricketers' Almanack described him in his obituary as one of the four best batsmen in the history of cricket. In a Test career spanning 85 matches, he scored 7,249 runs and took 83 wickets. Hammond captained England in 20 of those Tests, winning 4, losing 3, and drawing 13. His career aggregate of runs was the highest in Test cricket until surpassed by Colin Cowdrey in 1970; his total of 22 Test centuries remained an English record until Alastair Cook surpassed it in December 2012. Overall, he scored 50,551 runs and 167 centuries in first-class cricket games, respectively the seventh and third highest totals by a first-class cricketer. (Full article...)

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New York State Route 199

New York State Route 199, seen here east of Hammertown, is a 30.91-mile-long (49.74 km) state highway located in the Hudson Valley of the U.S. state of New York. From its west end in Ulster County north of Kingston, it crosses the Kingston–Rhinecliff Bridge over the Hudson River, crossing northern Dutchess County to its east end near Millerton.

Photograph: Daniel Case
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On this day

June 19: Juneteenth in some parts of the United States

Julius and Ethel Rosenberg
Julius and Ethel Rosenberg

Piers Gaveston, 1st Earl of Cornwall (d. 1312) · Mary Tenney Gray (b. 1833) · Nick Drake (b. 1948)

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Tomorrow

Featured article
June 20
Map showing highway's location

King's Highway 61 is a provincially maintained highway in the Canadian province of Ontario that forms part of the Lake Superior Circle Tour. The 61-kilometre (38 mi) route extends from a junction at Highway 11, Highway 17 and the Harbour Expressway in Thunder Bay south to a bridge over the Pigeon River, where it crosses into the United States and becomes Minnesota State Highway 61. The roads on either side of the river were completed in 1916, but there was no bridge to connect them. Funding for a bridge over the international crossing at the Pigeon River required federal approval from both governments, but local civic groups in Port Arthur and Duluth expected that the process would be too slow, and built it without approval. The bridge was opened by a travelling motorcade in August 1917, permitting travel between Ontario and Minnesota. To the surprise of the civic groups, Canadian and American highway officials attending the opening announced federal funding to cover the bridge costs. (Full article...)

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Cypress Trees

Cypress Trees is a polychrome-and-gold folding screen attributed to the Japanese painter Kanō Eitoku (1543–1590), one of the most prominent patriarchs of the Kanō school of Japanese painting. The painting dates to the Azuchi–Momoyama period. Now in Tokyo National Museum, it has been designated a National Treasure of Japan.

Painting: Kanō Eitoku
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On this day

June 20: Flag Day in Argentina

Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria

Anna Laetitia Barbauld (b. 1743) · Juan Larrea (d. 1847) · Frank Lampard (b. 1978)

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In two days

Featured article
June 21
Image of Andrea Doria

Two Andrea Doria-class dreadnought battleships were built for the Royal Italian Navy. Completed during World War I, Andrea Doria and Caio Duilio displayed incremental improvements over the preceding Conte di Cavour class. Like the earlier ships, they were armed with a main battery of thirteen 305-millimeter (12.0 in) guns. The two ships were based in southern Italy during World War I to help contain the Austro-Hungarian Navy surface fleet in the Adriatic, but neither vessel saw combat during the conflict. After the war, they cruised the Mediterranean and were involved in several international incidents, including at Corfu in 1923. In 1940, when Italy was engaged in World War II, they were moored when the British launched a carrier strike on the Italian fleet. In the resulting Battle of Taranto, Caio Duilio was hit by a torpedo and forced to beach to avoid sinking. (Full article...)

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Bare-faced curassow

A portrait of a female bare-faced curassow (Crax fasciolata), taken at the Pantanal in Brazil. This species of bird in the family Cracidae is found in eastern-central and southern Brazil, Paraguay, eastern Bolivia, and extreme northeast Argentina. Its natural habitats are tropical and subtropical dry and moist broadleaf forests.

Photograph: Charles J. Sharp
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On this day

June 21: June solstice (10:07 UTC, 2018); International Yoga Day; National Aboriginal Day in Canada

Replica of the Manchester Small-Scale Experimental Machine
Replica of the SSEM

Increase Mather (b. 1639) · Clara Immerwahr (b. 1870) · Gideon Sundback (d. 1954)

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In three days

Featured article
June 22
Artist's reconstruction of the dinosaur

Dilophosaurus was one of the earliest large predatory dinosaurs, living in what is now North America during the Early Jurassic, about 193 million years ago. The genus name means "two-crested lizard". It was smaller than some later theropods, about 7 meters (23 ft) in length, with a weight of about 400 kilograms (880 lb). It had a pair of plate-shaped crests on its skull, and the upper jaw had a gap below the nostril. The teeth were long, curved, and thin. The arms were powerful, and the hands had four fingers. Dilophosaurus was active and bipedal, and may have hunted large animals, though it could also have fed on smaller animals and fish. The function of the crests is unknown; they were too weak for battle, but may have been used in visual display. Dilophosaurus was featured in the movie Jurassic Park, in which it was given the fictional abilities to spit venom and expand a cowl on its neck. It has been designated as the state dinosaur of Connecticut. (Full article...)

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Simon Boccanegra libretto cover

The cover of the first edition libretto for the 1881 revision of Simon Boccanegra. This opera with a prologue and three acts was written by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on Antonio García Gutiérrez's play Simón Bocanegra (1843). First performed at Teatro La Fenice in Venice in 1857, it received a generally poor popular response and had dropped out of favour by 1866. Verdi prepared a revised edition more than a decade later, with text changes by Arrigo Boito. This version was first performed at La Scala in Milan in 1881, and remains the most frequently performed today.

Illustration: Uncredited; restoration: Adam Cuerden
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Featured list
June 22
Péter Besenyei
Péter Besenyei

Red Bull Air Race World Championship winners are determined by an international series of air races in which entrants compete to navigate a challenging obstacle course in the fastest time. The Red Bull Air Race World Championship was established in 2003 and created by Red Bull GmbH. Pilots fly individually against the clock and are required to complete tight turns through a slalom course consisting of inflatable pylons, known as "Air Gates". The races are held mainly over water near cities, but are also held at airfields or natural wonders (such as Sugarloaf Mountain and Monument Valley). The inaugural series comprising two races was won by the Hungarian pilot Péter Besenyei (aircraft pictured) who went on to secure second place the following three series. As of 2017, the most successful pilot in the history of the championship is Briton Paul Bonhomme who has won the title on three occasions, in 2009, 2010 and 2015. (Full list...)

On this day

June 22

Diego Maradona
Diego Maradona

Paulinus of Nola (d. 431) · Pascual Díaz y Barreto (b. 1876) · Elizabeth Warren (b. 1949)

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In four days

Featured article
June 23
The Monument to Edward Horner in Mells Parish Church (6022216545).jpg

The equestrian statue of Edward Horner stands inside St Andrew's Church in the village of Mells in Somerset, south-western England. The sculpture was designed by the architect Sir Edwin Lutyens and executed by the equestrian painter and war artist Alfred Munnings. It is a memorial to Edward Horner, who died of wounds in the First World War. Edward Horner was the only surviving son and heir of Sir John and Lady Frances Horner of Mells Manor and a member of an extended upper-class social group known as the Coterie, many of whom were killed in the war. Lutyens was a friend of the Horner family, having designed buildings and structures for them since the beginning of the 20th century. For Horner's memorial, Lutyens designed the plinth himself, and engaged Munnings for the latter's first public work of sculpture. The statue is a bronze of a cavalry officer on horseback, bare-headed, with his helmet and sword on the horse's saddle. (Full article...)

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Man Writing a Letter and Woman Reading a Letter

Man Writing a Letter and Woman Reading a Letter, two oil paintings on panel made by Dutch artist Gabriël Metsu in the 1660s. The former shows a young man sitting in front of an open window, writing a letter with a quill pen, while the latter depicts a woman reading a letter, which the work's symbolism suggests is a romantic one. These paintings are generally considered companion pieces, with the man writing the letter that the woman is reading. They have been held—and twice stolen—as a pair since at least the early 18th century, when the works were owned by collector Hendrick Sorgh of Amsterdam. They were donated to the National Gallery of Ireland in 1987.

Painting: Gabriël Metsu
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On this day

June 23: Grand Duke's Official Birthday in Luxembourg

Lake Louise, Banff National Park
Lake Louise, Banff National Park

Michèle Mouton (b. 1951) · V. V. Giri (d. 1980) · Betty Shabazz (d. 1997)

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In five days

Featured article
June 24
Image of the lemur

The small-toothed sportive lemur is a primate species in the family Lepilemuridae that—like all lemurs—is endemic to Madagascar. The species lives in dense rainforest in southeastern Madagascar, and can be found in two national parks, Ranomafana and Andringitra. Described in 1894, it is difficult to visually distinguish from the weasel sportive lemur. Phylogenetic studies support its species status and suggest that it is the only eastern Malagasy sportive lemur that is more closely related to western than to other eastern species. It weighs between 0.9 and 1.2 kg (2.0 and 2.6 lb) and measures 55 to 64 cm (22 to 25 in) from head to tail. Its fur is mostly reddish-brown or chestnut color, with a dark stripe running from its head down its back. Its underside and neck are lighter in color. Like other sportive lemurs, it is nocturnal, sleeping in concealed tangles of vegetation and tree holes. It is solitary and eats leaves, fruits, and flowers. (Full article...)

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Francine Jordi

Francine Jordi (b. 1977) is a Swiss pop singer. After winning the German Grand Prix der Volksmusik in 1998 with the song "Das Feuer der Sehnsucht", Jordi found success in Switzerland. In 2002, she represented Switzerland at the Eurovision Song Contest in Tallinn with a French language song "Dans le jardin de mon âme".

Photograph: Manfred Werner
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On this day

June 24

Manila Cathedral
Manila Cathedral

Edward de Vere (d. 1604) · Jean-Jacques Burlamaqui (b. 1694) · Carolyn S. Shoemaker (b. 1929)

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In six days

Featured article
June 25
Image of some Russulaceae

The Russulaceae are a diverse family of fungi in the order Russulales, with roughly 1,900 known species and a worldwide distribution. They include the genus Russula and the milk-cap mushrooms, some of which are edible. Russulaceae have gilled mushrooms characterised by brittle flesh. In addition to these typical agaricoid forms, the family contains species with fruitbodies that are laterally stiped (pleurotoid), closed (secotioid or gasteroid), or crust-like (corticioid). Molecular phylogenetics has demonstrated close affinities between species with very different fruitbody types and has discovered new, distinct lineages. An important group of root-symbiotic Russulaceae fungi in forests and shrublands around the world includes Lactifluus, Multifurca, Russula, and Lactarius. The crust-forming genera Boidinia, Gloeopeniophorella, and Pseudoxenasma, all wood-decay fungi, have basal positions in the family. (Full article...)

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Japanese destroyer Yamakaze (1936)

A view of the Japanese destroyer Yamakaze through the periscope of the submarine USS Nautilus, after being torpedoed approximately 60 nautical miles (110 km) southeast of Yokosuka, Japan. The Shiratsuyu-class destroyer, which had been traveling independently from Ōminato towards the Inland Sea, sank with all hands. Yamakaze had previously been involved in battles at Tarakan (1942), Java Sea (1942), and Midway (1942), sinking one submarine and assisting in the sinking of two ships.

Photograph: United States Navy
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Featured list
June 25

There are 37 light rail stations in the Metro system, a public transportation network serving the Minneapolis–Saint Paul, Minnesota, metropolitan area. Construction on the network's first light rail line, the Blue Line, began in 2001 and the system's first 12 stations opened on June 26, 2004. Later that year, five more stations opened, linking downtown Minneapolis with the Mall of America station in Bloomington, Minnesota. Two more stations opened on the Blue Line in 2009, including a new northern terminus, Target Field station (pictured). Construction on the Green Line began in 2010 and the entire line, connecting downtown Minneapolis and downtown Saint Paul, opened in 2014. Extensions to both lines are planned. An eastward extension from Target Field will add 15 new stations to the Green Line, connecting it to Eden Prairie, Minnesota, while a northward extension from Target Field will connect the Blue Line to Brooklyn Park, Minnesota, adding 11 stations to the system. The Green and Blue line extensions are slated to open for passenger service in 2021 and 2022, respectively. (Full list...)

On this day

June 25: Croatian Statehood Day and Slovenian Statehood Day

Michael Jackson in 1988
Michael Jackson

Antoni Gaudí (b. 1852) · Louis Mountbatten (b. 1900) · Michel Foucault (d. 1984)

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In seven days

Featured article
June 26
Image of Cruttwell

C. R. M. F. Cruttwell (1887–1941) was a British historian and academic who served as principal of Hertford College, Oxford. The author of A History of the Great War, 1914–18, he specialised in modern European history. In 1912 he became a lecturer in history at Hertford. His academic career was interrupted by war service during which he suffered severe wounds. He became dean of Hertford in 1919, and its principal in 1930. He served as a Justice of the Peace in Hampshire, where he had a country home, and stood unsuccessfully for the university's parliamentary seat in the 1935 general election, representing the Conservative party. The novelist Evelyn Waugh showed his distaste for Cruttwell, his former tutor, by repeatedly using the name in his early novels and stories to depict a sequence of unsavoury or ridiculous characters. This vendetta may have contributed to Cruttwell's eventual mental breakdown. (Full article...)

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Sagittarius

Sagittarius (Latin for the archer) is one of the 88 modern constellations. Commonly represented as a centaur drawing a bow, it lies between Scorpius and Ophiuchus to the west and Capricornus to the east. Among its features are Epsilon Sagittarii, the brightest star in the constellation, and the center of the Milky Way, lying in its westernmost. Sagittarius has been recognized since the time of the ancient Babylonians and Greeks, and today constitutes one of the twelve constellations of the zodiac

Here, Sagittarius is shown together with Corona Australis, Microscopium, Telescopium. This illustration by Sidney Hall was included in Urania's Mirror, a set of 32 astronomical star chart cards first published in 1824.

Illustration: Sidney Hall; restoration: Adam Cuerden
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On this day

June 26: International Day in Support of Victims of Torture; Independence Day in Madagascar (1960); Flag Day in Romania

Henri Moissan
Henri Moissan

George IV of the United Kingdom (d. 1830) · Elvy Kalep (b. 1899) · Yevgeny Primakov (d. 2015)

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