Wikipedia:Main Page queue

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Today

Featured article
October 20

Boogeyman 2 is a 2007 supernatural horror film edited and directed by Jeff Betancourt and written by Brian Sieve. It stars Danielle Savre as Laura Porter, a young woman who as a child witnessed the murder of her parents by an unknown assailant. Believing the killer to have been the Boogeyman, she participates in group therapy to overcome her phobia. After the creature becomes a reality, her fellow patients are murdered one by one, with their fears being used against them. Following the financial success of the previous film, production began in October 2006, with filming taking place at the former Linda Vista Community Hospital in Los Angeles. After a sold-out screening at the Screamfest Horror Film Festival in October 2007, the film was released direct-to-video in January 2008. Critics described the plot and characters as unoriginal and boring but praised the death sequences and a more realistic approach to the Boogeyman, setting the film apart from contemporary creature features. Although Boogeyman 2 earned only around $4.3 million on a budget of $4.5 million, it was followed by Boogeyman 3, released in October 2008. (Full article...)

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Curug Cipendok

Curug Cipendok is a waterfall located near Purwokerto, Central Java, Indonesia. Measuring 92 m (302 ft) in height, it is one of the area's highest waterfalls. The site, which hosts a campsite and lake, is one of the more popular tourist destinations in the Banyumas area.

Photograph: Chris Woodrich
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Featured list
October 20
Manisha Koirala
Manisha Koirala

Nepali actress Manisha Koirala is known for her work in Bollywood films. Koirala's acting debut was in the Nepali film Pheri Bhetaula (1989). Two years later, she made her Bollywood debut in Subhash Ghai's Saudagar, which was a commercial success. However, she followed this by appearing in a series of films which performed poorly at the box office. Koirala's career had a turnaround when she starred as the daughter of a freedom fighter in Vidhu Vinod Chopra's 1942: A Love Story (1994). The following year, Koirala received the Filmfare Critics Award for Best Actress, and the Filmfare Award for Best Actress – Tamil for playing a Muslim married to a Hindu during the 1992–1993 Bombay riots in the Mani Ratnam-directed Tamil drama Bombay (1995). For playing the daughter of a mute and deaf couple in Sanjay Leela Bhansali's Khamoshi: The Musical (1996), Koirala garnered a second consecutive Filmfare Critics Award for Best Actress. She followed this with leading roles in Agni Sakshi (1996) and Gupt: The Hidden Truth (1997), which were among the highest-grossing Indian films of their respective years. (Full list...)

On this day

October 20

Maria Theresa of Austria
Maria Theresa of Austria

Ralph d'Escures (d. 1122) · Simon de Vos (b. 1603) · Jean Keene (b. 1923)

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Tomorrow

Featured article
October 21
The "Interrupted Flight" monument to the victims

The Kragujevac massacre (21 October 1941) was the mass murder of almost 2,800 men and boys in the city of Kragujevac in the German-occupied territory of Serbia by German soldiers during World War II. Coming in reprisal for insurgent attacks that killed 10 German soldiers in the Gornji Milanovac district, it followed a punitive German operation in which 492 males were shot and four villages were burned down. The victims included Serbs, Jews, Romani people, Muslims, Macedonians, and Slovenes. The massacre exacerbated tensions between the two guerrilla movements, the communist-led Partisans and the royalist, Serbian nationalist Chetniks, and convinced Chetnik leader Draža Mihailović that further attacks against the Germans would only result in more Serb civilian deaths. Several senior German military officials were tried and convicted during and after the Nuremberg Trials for their involvement in the reprisal shootings. The massacre has been the subject of several poems and feature films. Commemorated annually in Serbia, it is memorialised at the October in Kragujevac Memorial Park and its 21st October Museum. (Full article...)

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April 2014 lunar eclipse

The total lunar eclipse that occurred in April 2014, as viewed from Charleston, West Virginia. The first of two total lunar eclipses in 2014, it was visible in the Americas and the Pacific Ocean region. Although within the Earth's shadow, the eclipsed moon is lit by sunlight refracted and scattered by the Earth's atmosphere, and more of this light reaches the outer parts of the umbra than the center of it. During this eclipse, the Moon passed south of the center of the umbra, so its southern part was noticeably lighter.

Photograph: Robert Jay GaBany
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On this day

October 21: Twin Holy Birthdays begin (Bahá'í Faith, 2017)

Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson
Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson

Sims Reeves (b. 1821) · Isabelle Eberhardt (d. 1904) · Virginia Zeani (b. 1925)

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In two days

Featured article
October 22
Amargasaurus NT small.jpg

Amargasaurus was a sauropod dinosaur that lived in what is now Argentina from roughly 129 to 122 million years ago, during the Early Cretaceous epoch. The only known skeleton was discovered in 1984 and is virtually complete. Amargasaurus cazaui, the only species in the genus, was a large animal reaching 9 to 10 meters (30 to 33 feet) in length, with two parallel rows of tall spines down its neck and back. The spines, taller than in any other known sauropod, probably protruded as solitary structures supporting a keratinous sheath, and may have been used for display, combat, or defense. Alternatively, they might have formed a scaffold supporting a skin sail. A herbivore, Amargasaurus probably fed at mid-height. Discovered in sedimentary rocks of the La Amarga Formation, it is most closely related to the Late Jurassic genera Dicraeosaurus, Brachytrachelopan and Suuwassea. Together, these genera form the family Dicraeosauridae, with shorter necks and smaller body sizes than other sauropods. (Full article...)

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Parisian Women in Algerian Costume (The Harem)

Parisian Women in Algerian Costume (The Harem) is a painting by the French artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir completed 1872. Renoir created the painting, which acknowledged the artificial nature of much Orientalist painting by making it clear that these were Parisian women in costume, in homage to Eugène Delacroix's Women of Algiers (1834). Rejected for entry to the 1872 Paris Salon and disliked by the artist, it was eventually sold for a small sum as part of a larger lot. It is now in the National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo.

Painting: Pierre-Auguste Renoir
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On this day

October 22: Bicentenary of the Birth of Bahá'u'lláh (Bahá’í Faith, 2017), International Stuttering Awareness Day

Hubert Pierlot
Hubert Pierlot

Franz Liszt (b. 1811) · Nadia Boulanger (d. 1979) ·

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In three days

Featured article
October 23
Blackbeard, as pictured by Benjamin Cole

Blackbeard (Edward Teach, c. 1680 – 1718) was an English pirate who operated around the West Indies and the eastern coast of the American colonies. He was probably born in Bristol, but little is known about his early life. He may have served on privateer ships during Queen Anne's War before he joined the crew of Benjamin Hornigold, a pirate who operated from the Caribbean island of New Providence. In the Queen Anne's Revenge, a renamed merchant vessel, Teach blockaded the port of Charles Town, South Carolina, with an alliance of pirates. After successfully ransoming its inhabitants, he settled in Bath Town, but soon returned to piracy. He was attacked and killed near Ocracoke Island by a crew seeking the reward for his capture. A shrewd and calculating leader, he avoided the use of force, and there are no accounts of his ever having harmed or murdered those he held captive. Following his death, his image was romanticised, becoming the inspiration for a variety of pirate-themed works of fiction. (Full article...)

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Keble College, Oxford

The interior of the dining hall at Keble College in Oxford, England. Established in 1870 as a monument to John Keble, a leading member of the Oxford Movement, the college is the largest (by rooms) of constituent colleges of the University of Oxford. Its neo-gothic red-brick buildings, designed by William Butterfield, housed 433 undergraduates and 245 graduate students in the 2011/12 academic year.

Photograph: David Iliff
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Featured list
October 23
Barry Bonds
Barry Bonds

The 500 home run club is a group of Major League Baseball (MLB) batters who have hit 500 or more regular-season home runs in their careers. On August 11, 1929, Babe Ruth became the first member of the club. Ruth ended his career with 714 home runs, a record which stood from 1935 until Hank Aaron surpassed it in 1974. Aaron's ultimate career total, 755, remained the record until Barry Bonds (pictured) set the current mark of 762 during the 2007 season. Twenty-seven players are members of the 500 home run club. Of these 27 players, 14 were right-handed batters, 11 were left-handed, and 2 were switch hitters. The San Francisco Giants and Boston Red Sox are the only franchises to see four players reach the milestone while on their roster. Five 500 home run club members—Aaron, Willie Mays, Eddie Murray, Rafael Palmeiro, and Alex Rodriguez—are also members of the 3,000 hit club. (Full list...)

On this day

October 23: National Day in Hungary (1956); Labour Day in New Zealand (2017); Mole Day

Claude François de Malet
Claude François de Malet

Clarice Cliff (d. 1972) · Annabel Breuer (b. 1992) ·

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In four days

Featured article
October 24
Astraeus hygrometricus 122239.jpg

Astraeus hygrometricus, the false earthstar, is a fungus common in temperate and tropical regions around the world. When young, it resembles a puffball; in maturity, the outer layer of fruit body tissue splits open in a star shape, similar in appearance to the earthstars. The fungus grows in mutual symbiosis with roots of various trees, especially in sandy soils. It can open up its rays to expose the spore sac in response to increased humidity, and close them up again in drier conditions. The rays have an irregularly cracked surface, while the spore case is pale brown and smooth with an irregular slit or tear at the top. The gleba is white initially, but turns brown and powdery when the reddish-brown spores mature. The species was first described by Christiaan Hendrik Persoon in 1801. Several bioactive chemical compounds have been found in the fruit bodies. North American field guides typically rate the fungus as inedible. (Full article...)

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Jane Seymour

Jane Seymour (c. 1508 – 1537) was Queen of England from 1536 to 1537 as the third wife of King Henry VIII. She succeeded Anne Boleyn as queen consort following the latter's execution in May 1536. She died of postnatal complications less than two weeks after the birth of her only child, a son who became King Edward VI on Henry's death. She was the only one of Henry's wives to receive a queen's funeral, and his only consort to be buried beside him in St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle.

Painting: Hans Holbein the Younger
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On this day

October 24: United Nations Day (1945); Independence Day in Zambia (1964)

Domitian (b. 51) · Letitia Woods Brown (b. 1915)

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In five days

Featured article
October 25
Nancy Cartwright at the 41st Annual Annie Awards

Nancy Cartwright (born October 25, 1957) is an American actress and comedian. On the animated television series The Simpsons, she is the voice of Bart Simpson, as well as Nelson Muntz, Ralph Wiggum, and Todd Flanders. Her first professional role was voicing Gloria in the animated series Richie Rich, followed by a starring role in the television movie Marian Rose White (1982). In 1987, intending to audition for the role of Lisa Simpson in a series of animated shorts, she found Bart more interesting, and was offered the role on the spot by Matt Groening, the series' creator. She held the role for three seasons on The Tracey Ullman Show, and has voiced Bart for 29 seasons on The Simpsons, winning an Emmy and an Annie Award for her work. Cartwright has also voiced Daffney Gillfin in The Snorks, Rufus in Kim Possible, Mindy in Animaniacs, Margo Sherman in The Critic, and Chuckie in Rugrats and All Grown Up! She has adapted her autobiography, My Life as a 10-Year-Old Boy (2000), into a one-woman play. (Full article...)

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Manhattan

A panoramic view of Lower Manhattan as seen at dusk from Jersey City, New Jersey, in November 2014. Manhattan is the most densely populated borough of New York City. It is the city's economic and administrative center, and a major global cultural, financial, media, and entertainment center.

Photograph: Tony Jin
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On this day

October 25: Retrocession Day in Taiwan (1945)

The Hartog Plate (replica)
The Hartog Plate (replica)

Geoffrey Chaucer (d. 1400) · George II of Great Britain (d. 1760) · Thomas Babington Macaulay (b. 1800) · Nancy Cartwright (b. 1957)

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In six days

Featured article
October 26
Marit Larsen pictured in 2009

"Don't Say You Love Me" is the début single by M2M, the Norwegian pop duo of Marion Raven and Marit Larsen (pictured). The song first appeared on Radio Disney before its official US radio and single release on 26 October 1999. It was included the following month on the soundtrack to Pokémon: The First Movie, and appears in the film's closing credits. The song was featured on M2M's début album, Shades of Purple (2000), and also appeared on their compilation album The Day You Went Away: The Best of M2M (2003). Among the song's many positive reviews, Chuck Taylor from Billboard said it was "absolutely enchanting" and would appeal to both young and mature listeners. It reached number 2 in Norway, number 4 in both Australia and New Zealand, number 16 in the UK and number 21 on the US Billboard Hot 100. It was certified gold in the US and Australia and remains M2M's biggest hit. They performed the song on episodes of the TV series One World, Top of the Pops and Disney Channel in Concert. Two similar music videos were released for the song, with one showing clips from Pokémon: The First Movie. (Full article...)

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Susan B. Anthony dollar design

A design by Chief Engraver of the United States Mint Frank Gasparro for the Susan B. Anthony dollar, a dollar coin minted from 1979 to 1981 and again in 1999. Proposed as a smaller replacement for the cumbersome Eisenhower dollar, the coin was initially intended to depict an allegorical representation of Liberty. However, legislative and popular demand led to the likeness of social reformer and women's rights activist Susan B. Anthony being used instead. In 1978, Gasparro began preparing a design, going through multiple versions depicting Anthony at various stages of her life before settling on an approximation of her at age 50. After the final design was approved, the dollar was first struck in 1978.

Illustration: Frank Gasparro
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On this day

October 26: National Day in Austria (1955)

Wyatt Earp
Wyatt Earp

Elizabeth Cady Stanton (d. 1902) · Hillary Clinton (b. 1947)

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In seven days

Featured article
October 27
USS Enterprise under attack by dive bombers during the battle

The Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands (25–27 October 1942) was the fourth aircraft carrier battle fought between the navies of the United States and Japan during World War II. It was part of the Guadalcanal Campaign, through which the Allies sought to parry and reverse Japanese advances in the southwest Pacific. In an attempt to drive Allied forces from Guadalcanal and nearby islands and end the stalemate there, the Japanese Army planned a ground offensive for 20–25 October. In support, carriers and other large warships were moved into position near the southern Solomon Islands, where they hoped to engage and defeat any Allied naval forces responding to the offensive. As in the battles of the Coral Sea, Midway, and the Eastern Solomons, almost all attacks by both sides were mounted by or against carrier- or land-based aircraft. Allied surface ships were forced to retreat after one carrier was sunk and another heavily damaged, but the veteran pilots lost by the Japanese proved to be irreplaceable. (Full article...)

Part of the Guadalcanal Campaign series, one of Wikipedia's featured topics.

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Ramaria gracilis

Ramaria gracilis is a species of coral fungus in the family Gomphaceae. Originally described by Christiaan Hendrik Persoon in 1797, this species is found in European coniferous woodland, where it grows on leaf litter. Fruit bodies are made up of a dense cluster of branches that measure up to 8 centimetres (3.1 in) in height and 4 centimetres (1.6 in) in width.

Photograph: H. Krisp
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Featured list
October 27
A budgerigar with pin feathers showing
A budgerigar with pin feathers showing

There are thousands of common English language terms that are used in relation to the study of birds—warm-blooded vertebrates of the class Aves, characterized by feathers, the ability to fly in all but the approximately 60 extant species of flightless birds, toothless, beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart and a strong yet lightweight skeleton. Among other details such as size, proportions and shape, terms defining bird features developed and are used to describe features unique to the class—especially evolutionary adaptations that developed to aid flight. There are, for example, numerous terms describing the complex structural makeup up feathers (e.g., barbules, rachides and vanes); types of feathers (e.g., filoplume, pennaceous and plumulaceous feathers); and their growth and loss (e.g., colour mourph, nuptial plumage and pterylosis). Although some terms in the area may be familiar, such as back or belly, they too are defined in relation to distinct features of external bird anatomy, sometimes called topography. (Full glossary...)

On this day

October 27: Independence Day in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (1979) and Turkmenistan (1991)

City Hall station, New York City Subway
City Hall station, New York City Subway

Æthelstan (d. 939) · Sylvia Plath (b. 1932) · Zoya Phan (b. 1980) ·

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