United States men's national ice hockey team

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United States
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Team U.S.A., Ice Yanks
Association USA Hockey
General Manager Vacant
Head coach Tony Granato
Assistants Keith Allain
Chris Chelios
Ron Rolston
Scott Young
Captain Brian Gionta
Most games Mark Johnson (151)
Most points Mark Johnson (146)
Team colors               
IIHF code USA
USA national hockey team jerseys 2014.png
Ranking
Current IIHF 6 Decrease1
Highest IIHF 4 (2016)
Lowest IIHF 7 (first in 2003)
First international
 United States 29–0 Switzerland  
(Antwerp, Belgium; April 23, 1920)
Biggest win
 United States 31–1 Italy 
(St. Moritz, Switzerland; February 1, 1948)
Biggest defeat
 Sweden 17–2 United States 
(Stockholm, Sweden; March 12, 1963)
 Soviet Union 17–2 United States 
(Stockholm, Sweden; March 15, 1969)
IIHF World Championships
Appearances 69 (first in 1920)
Best result Gold medal world centered-2.svg Gold: 2 (1933, 1960)
Canada Cup / World Cup
Appearances 8 (first in 1976)
Best result Gold medal world centered-2.svg Winner: 1 (1996)
Olympics
Appearances 21 (first in 1920)
Medals Gold medal.svg Gold (1960, 1980)
Silver medal.svg Silver (1920, 1924, 1932, 1952, 1956, 1972, 2002, 2010)
Bronze medal.svg Bronze: (1936)
Medal record
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 1960 Squaw Valley USA
Gold medal – first place 1980 Lake Placid USA
Silver medal – second place 1920 Antwerp USA
Silver medal – second place 1924 Chamonix USA
Silver medal – second place 1932 Lake Placid USA
Silver medal – second place 1952 Oslo USA
Silver medal – second place 1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo USA
Silver medal – second place 1972 Sapporo USA
Silver medal – second place 2002 Salt Lake City USA
Silver medal – second place 2010 Vancouver USA
Bronze medal – third place 1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen USA
Canada Cup/World Cup of Hockey
Gold medal – first place 1996 World Cup of Hockey Team
Silver medal – second place 1991 Canada Cup Team
World Championship
Gold medal – first place 1933 Czechoslovakia
Silver medal – second place 1931 Poland
Silver medal – second place 1934 Italy
Silver medal – second place 1939 Switzerland
Silver medal – second place 1950 Great Britain
Bronze medal – third place 1949 Sweden
Bronze medal – third place 1962 United States
Bronze medal – third place 1996 Austria
Bronze medal – third place 2004 Czech Republic
Bronze medal – third place 2013 Sweden/Finland
Bronze medal – third place 2015 Czech Republic

The United States men's national ice hockey team is based in Colorado Springs, Colorado, with its U18 and U17 development program in Plymouth, Michigan. The team is controlled by USA Hockey, the governing body for organized ice hockey in the United States. The US team is ranked 4th in the IIHF World Rankings.[1] The current head coach is Tony Granato.[2]

The United States won gold medals at the 1960 and 1980 Winter Olympics and more recently, silver medals at the 2002 and 2010 Winter Olympics. The United States won the 1996 World Cup of Hockey. The team's most recent medal at the World Championships came with a bronze in 2015. They won the tournament in 1933 and 1960. Unlike other nations, the United States doesn't typically use its best NHL players in the World Championships even when they're available. Instead, USA Hockey uses this tournament as a platform for young NHLers and college players.

United States is a member of the so-called "Big Six", the unofficial group of the six strongest men's ice hockey nations, along with Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, Russia, and Sweden.[3]

As of 2014, the US has a registered ice hockey population of 611,926 with USA Hockey.[4] USA Hockey is the largest governing body for ice hockey in the United States and is considered the best representation of the number of players playing ice hockey in the US.[5]

History

The American ice hockey team's greatest success was the "Miracle on Ice" at the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York when American college players defeated the heavily favored professionals from the Soviet Union on the way to a gold medal. Though hockey is not a major sport in most areas of the United States, the "Miracle" is often listed as one of the all-time greatest American sporting achievements. The United States also won the gold medal in the 1960 Games at Squaw Valley, California, defeating the Soviet Union, Canada, Czechoslovakia, and Sweden along the way. However, since this victory is not as well known as the 1980 win, it has come to be known as the "Forgotten Miracle".[6][7]

U.S. hockey experienced a spike in talent in the 1980s and 1990s, with future National Hockey League (NHL) stars including Tony Amonte, Chris Chelios, Derian Hatcher, Brett Hull, Pat LaFontaine, John LeClair, Brian Leetch, Mike Modano, Mike Richter, Jeremy Roenick, Kevin Stevens, Keith Tkachuk, and Doug Weight. Although the United States finished no higher than fourth in any World or Olympic event from 1981 through 1994 (the US never used its best in these tournaments), the Americans did reach the final of the 1991 Canada Cup and did win the 1996 World Cup with a squad of NHL players. Six years later, after the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and NHL arranged to accommodate an Olympic break in the NHL schedule, the United States earned a silver medal at the 2002 Winter Olympics with a roster that included NHL stars Adam Deadmarsh, Chris Drury, Brian Rafalski, and Brian Rolston. But by 2006, many of these NHL All-Stars had retired or had declined with age. Though the 2006 Olympic team finished a disappointing 8th, it was more of a transitional team, featuring young NHL players like Rick DiPietro, John-Michael Liles, and Jordan Leopold.

The 2010 U.S. Olympic team was composed of much younger and faster players than teams of previous years, including David Backes, Dustin Brown, Jack Johnson, Patrick Kane, Phil Kessel, Zach Parise, Joe Pavelski, Bobby Ryan, Paul Stastny, and Ryan Suter. The team also had a solid group of veterans that included top NHL goalie Ryan Miller top defenseman Brian Rafalski and U.S. Olympic Team Captain Jamie Langenbrunner. The U.S. team upset team Canada 5–3 in the round-robin phase of the tournament and went into the single elimination phase of the tournament as the number-one seeded team. After beating Finland 6–1 the United States advanced to the gold medal game, where they lost in overtime 3–2 to Canada to claim the silver medal. The gold medal game between Canada and the United States was watched by an estimated 27.6 million U.S. households. This was the most watched hockey game in America since the 1980 "Miracle on Ice" game, including any Stanley Cup Final or NHL Winter Classic broadcast.[8]

The NHL pulled out of the Olympics for the 2018 competition in a dispute over insurance and the IOC's ambush marketing restrictions, prohibiting the national teams from inviting any player it held under contract. On January 1, 2018, the US roster was announced. Five players both from the Swiss National League and the KHL, four players from the NCAA, three players from the Swedish League and the AHL and two players from the German League made the team. Brian Gionta, the captain, is the lone unsigned free agent in the 25-men roster (he was signed to a practice squad contract with an AHL team at the time).[9]

Tournament record

Olympic Games

Year Result
1920 Silver
1924 Silver
1932 Silver
1936 Bronze
1948 disqualified
1952 Silver
1956 Silver
1960 Gold
1964 5th place
1968 6th place
1972 Silver
1976 5th place
1980 Gold
1984 7th place
1988 7th place
1992 4th place
1994 8th place
1998 6th place
2002 Silver
2006 8th place
2010 Silver
2014 4th place
2018 7th place
Totals
Games Gold Silver Bronze Total
21 2 8 1 11

Canada Cup

  • 1976 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1981 – Finished in 4th place, lost semi-final
  • 1984 – Finished in 4th place, lost semi-final
  • 1987 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1991 – Finished in 2nd place, lost final

World Cup

World Championship

See: Ice Hockey World Championships and List of IIHF World Championship medalists
Note: Between 1920 and 1968, the Olympic hockey tournament was also considered the World Championship for that year.[10]
  • 1920 – Won Silver medal
  • 1924 – Won Silver medal
  • 1931 – Won Silver medal
  • 1932 – Won Silver medal
  • 1933Won Gold medal
  • 1934 – Won Silver medal
  • 1936 – Won Bronze medal
  • 1938 – Finished in 7th place
  • 1939 – Won Silver medal
  • 1940–46 – Not held[11]
  • 1947 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1948 – Finished in 4th place
  • 1949 – Won Bronze medal
  • 1950 – Won Silver medal
  • 1951 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1952 – Won Silver medal
  • 1955 – Finished in 4th place
  • 1956 – Won Silver medal
  • 1958 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1959 – Finished in 4th place
  • 1960Won Gold medal
  • 1961 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1962 – Won Bronze medal
  • 1963 – Finished in 8th place
  • 1964 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1965 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1966 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1967 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1968 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1969 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1970 – Finished in 7th place (Won "Pool B")
  • 1971 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1972 – Finished in 8th place (2nd in "Pool B")[12]
  • 1973 – Finished in 8th place (2nd in "Pool B")
  • 1974 – Finished in 7th place (Won "Pool B")
  • 1975 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1976 – Finished in 4th place
  • 1977 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1978 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1979 – Finished in 7th place
  • 1980 – Not held[13]
  • 1981 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1982 – Finished in 8th place
  • 1983 – Finished in 9th place (Won "Pool B")
  • 1984 – Not held[13]
  • 1985 – Finished in 4th place
  • 1986 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1987 – Finished in 7th place
  • 1988 – Not held[13]
  • 1989 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1990 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1991 – Finished in 4th place
  • 1992 – Finished in 7th place
  • 1993 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1994 – Finished in 4th place
  • 1995 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1996 – Won Bronze medal
  • 1997 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1998 – Finished in 12th place
  • 1999 – Finished in 6th place
  • 2000 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2001 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2002 – Finished in 7th place
  • 2003 – Finished in 13th place
  • 2004 – Won Bronze medal
  • 2005 – Finished in 6th place
  • 2006 – Finished in 7th place
  • 2007 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2008 – Finished in 6th place
  • 2009 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2010 – Finished in 13th place
  • 2011 – Finished in 8th place
  • 2012 – Finished in 7th place
  • 2013 – Won Bronze medal
  • 2014 – Finished in 6th place
  • 2015 – Won Bronze medal
  • 2016 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2017 – Finished in 5th place

Others

Team

Current roster

Roster for the 2018 Winter Olympics.[18]

Head coach: Tony Granato

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
4 D Billins, ChadChad Billins 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (1989-05-26) May 26, 1989 (age 28) Sweden Linköpings HC
5 D Welch, NoahNoah WelchA 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) 100 kg (220 lb) (1982-08-26) August 26, 1982 (age 35) Sweden Växjö Lakers
7 F McCarthy, JohnJohn McCarthy 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1986-08-09) August 9, 1986 (age 31) United States San Jose Barracuda
9 F O'Neill, BrianBrian O'Neill 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in) 78 kg (172 lb) (1988-06-01) June 1, 1988 (age 29) Finland Jokerit
11 F Roe, GarrettGarrett Roe 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1988-02-22) February 22, 1988 (age 30) Switzerland EV Zug
12 F Gionta, BrianBrian GiontaC 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 81 kg (179 lb) (1979-01-18) January 18, 1979 (age 39) United States Rochester Americans
13 D Gunderson, RyanRyan Gunderson 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (1985-08-16) August 16, 1985 (age 32) Sweden Brynäs IF
14 F Little, BrocBroc Little 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 86 kg (190 lb) (1988-03-24) March 24, 1988 (age 29) Switzerland HC Davos
15 F Butler, BobbyBobby Butler 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 86 kg (190 lb) (1987-04-26) April 26, 1987 (age 30) United States Milwaukee Admirals
16 F Donato, RyanRyan Donato 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1996-04-09) April 9, 1996 (age 21) United States Harvard Univ.
17 F Bourque, ChrisChris Bourque 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (1986-01-29) January 29, 1986 (age 32) United States Hershey Bears
18 F Greenway, JordanJordan Greenway 1.97 m (6 ft 6 in) 103 kg (227 lb) (1997-02-16) February 16, 1997 (age 21) United States Boston Univ.
19 F Slater, JimJim SlaterA 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 86 kg (190 lb) (1982-12-09) December 9, 1982 (age 35) Switzerland HC Fribourg-Gottéron
20 D Borgen, WillWill Borgen 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 85 kg (187 lb) (1996-12-19) December 19, 1996 (age 21) United States St. Cloud State Univ.
21 D Wisniewski, JamesJames Wisniewski 1.8 m (5 ft 11 in) 92 kg (203 lb) (1984-02-21) February 21, 1984 (age 34) Germany Kassel Huskies
22 D Sanguinetti, BobbyBobby Sanguinetti 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 86 kg (190 lb) (1988-02-29) February 29, 1988 (age 29) Switzerland HC Lugano
23 F Terry, TroyTroy Terry 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (1997-09-10) September 10, 1997 (age 20) United States Univ. of Denver
24 D Blum, JonathonJonathon Blum 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 85 kg (187 lb) (1989-01-30) January 30, 1989 (age 29) Russia Admiral Vladivostok
26 F Arcobello, MarkMark Arcobello 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (1988-08-12) August 12, 1988 (age 29) Switzerland SC Bern
30 G Zapolski, RyanRyan Zapolski 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 84 kg (185 lb) (1986-11-11) November 11, 1986 (age 31) Finland Jokerit
31 G Maxwell, BrandonBrandon Maxwell 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 89 kg (196 lb) (1991-03-22) March 22, 1991 (age 26) Czech Republic BK Mladá Boleslav
33 G Leggio, DavidDavid Leggio 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1984-07-31) July 31, 1984 (age 33) Germany EHC Red Bull München
42 F Kolarik, ChadChad Kolarik 1.8 m (5 ft 11 in) 83 kg (183 lb) (1986-01-26) January 26, 1986 (age 32) Germany Adler Mannheim
94 F Stoa, RyanRyan Stoa 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 96 kg (212 lb) (1987-04-13) April 13, 1987 (age 30) Russia HC Spartak Moscow
97 D Gilroy, MattMatt GilroyA 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 92 kg (203 lb) (1984-07-30) July 30, 1984 (age 33) Finland Jokerit

IIHF World Championship directorate awards

The IIHF has given awards for each year's championship tournament to the top goalie, defenseman, and forward (all since 1954), and most valuable player (since 2004). The following USA team members have won awards.

See also

References

  1. ^ World Ranking
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ "NHL announces World Cup of Hockey for 2016". The Canadian Press. 2015-01-24. Retrieved January 29, 2015. 
  4. ^ http://www.usahockey.com/page/show/839306-membership-statistics
  5. ^ http://unitedstatesofhockey.com/2014/06/17/u-s-hockey-participation-numbers-for-2013-14/
  6. ^ Burnside, Scott (2010-02-08). "Hockey's miracle before the 'Miracle'". ESPN. Retrieved 2011-10-07. 
  7. ^ "The Morning Skate: The Forgotten Miracle of 1960". New York Times. 2009-12-11. Retrieved 2011-10-07. 
  8. ^ "Hockey Game Seen by 27.6 Million" New York Times, 1 March 2010. Retrieved 1 March 2010
  9. ^ https://www.teamusa.org/News/2018/January/01/New-Look-2018-US-Olympic-Mens-Ice-Hockey-Team-Named-Led-By-2006-Olympian-Brian-Gionta
  10. ^ See: Ice Hockey World Championships.
  11. ^ See Ice Hockey World Championships#1930–1953: Canadian dominance. World War II forced the cancellation of the 1940 and 1944 Winter Olympics and the world championships from 1941 to 1946. "International hockey timeline". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 2009-03-10.  (ed.) Carl Diem (January 1940). "The Fifth Olympic Winter Games Will Not Be Held" (PDF). Olympic Review. Berlin: International Olympic Institute (8): 8–10. Retrieved 2009-03-10. 
  12. ^ See: 1972 World Ice Hockey Championships. For the first time, a separate tournament is held for both the World Championships and the Winter Olympics.
  13. ^ a b c No championships were held during the Olympic years 1980, 1984, and 1988. See: Ice Hockey World Championships#1976–1987: First years of open competition and List of IIHF World Championship medalists.
  14. ^ USA Hockey Deutschland Cup Archives Archived October 4, 2006, at the Wayback Machine.
  15. ^ 2003&2004 Deutschland Cup
  16. ^ 2005 Deutschland Cup
  17. ^ USA Hockey Deutschland/TUI Cup results Archived October 4, 2006, at the Wayback Machine.
  18. ^ [2]

External links

  • Official website
  • IIHF profile
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