United States men's national ice hockey team

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United States
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Team USA
Association USA Hockey
General Manager Bill Zito
Head coach Jeff Blashill
Assistants Dan Bylsma
Don Granato
Seth Appert
Captain Patrick Kane
Most games Mark Johnson (151)
Most points Mark Johnson (146)
Team colors               
IIHF code USA
United States national ice hockey team jerseys 2018 (WOG).png
Ranking
Current IIHF 4 Increase1
Highest IIHF 4 (first in 2016)
Lowest IIHF 7 (first in 2003)
First international
 United States 29–0 Switzerland  
(Antwerp, Belgium; April 24, 1920)
Biggest win
 United States 31–1 Italy 
(St. Moritz, Switzerland; February 1, 1948)
Biggest defeat
 Sweden 17–2 United States 
(Stockholm, Sweden; March 12, 1963)
 Soviet Union 17–2 United States 
(Stockholm, Sweden; March 15, 1969)
IIHF World Championships
Appearances 69 (first in 1920)
Best result Gold medal world centered-2.svg Gold: (1933, 1960)
Canada Cup/World Cup
Appearances 8 (first in 1976)
Best result Gold medal world centered-2.svg Gold: (1996)
Olympics
Appearances 22 (first in 1920)
Medals Gold medal.svg Gold: (1960, 1980)
Silver medal.svg Silver: (1920, 1924, 1932, 1952, 1956, 1972, 2002, 2010)
Bronze medal.svg Bronze: (1936)
Medal record
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 1960 Squaw Valley Team
Gold medal – first place 1980 Lake Placid Team
Silver medal – second place 1920 Antwerp Team
Silver medal – second place 1924 Chamonix Team
Silver medal – second place 1932 Lake Placid Team
Silver medal – second place 1952 Oslo Team
Silver medal – second place 1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo Team
Silver medal – second place 1972 Sapporo Team
Silver medal – second place 2002 Salt Lake City Team
Silver medal – second place 2010 Vancouver Team
Bronze medal – third place 1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen Team
World Championship
Gold medal – first place 1933 Czechoslovakia
Gold medal – first place 1960 United States Team
Silver medal – second place 1920 Belgium Team
Silver medal – second place 1924 France Team
Silver medal – second place 1931 Poland
Silver medal – second place 1932 United States Team
Silver medal – second place 1934 Italy
Silver medal – second place 1939 Switzerland
Silver medal – second place 1950 Great Britain
Silver medal – second place 1952 Norway Team
Silver medal – second place 1956 Italy Team
Bronze medal – third place 1936 Germany Team
Bronze medal – third place 1949 Sweden
Bronze medal – third place 1962 United States
Bronze medal – third place 1996 Austria
Bronze medal – third place 2004 Czech Republic
Bronze medal – third place 2013 Sweden/Finland
Bronze medal – third place 2015 Czech Republic
Bronze medal – third place 2018 Denmark
Canada Cup/World Cup
Gold medal – first place 1996 Montreal
Silver medal – second place 1991 Hamilton

The United States men's national ice hockey team[1] is based in Colorado Springs, Colorado, with its U18 and U17 development program in Plymouth, Michigan. The team is controlled by USA Hockey, the governing body for organized ice hockey in the United States. The U.S. team is ranked 6th in the IIHF World Rankings.[2] The current head coach is Jeff Blashill.[3]

The U.S. won gold medals at the 1960 and 1980 Olympics and more recently, silver medals at the 2002 and 2010 Olympics. The U.S. also won the 1996 World Cup of Hockey, defeating Canada in the finals. The team's most recent medal at the World Championships came with a bronze in 2018. They won the tournament in 1933 and 1960. Unlike other nations, the U.S. doesn't typically use its best NHL players in the World Championships. Instead, it provides the younger players with an opportunity to gain international experience.[4] Overall, the team has collected eleven Olympic medals (two of them gold), eighteen World Championship medals (two of them gold), and it reached the semifinal round of the Canada Cup/World Cup five times, twice advancing to the finals and winning gold once.[5]

The U.S. is a member of the so-called "Big Six", the unofficial group of the six strongest men's ice hockey nations, along with Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, Russia, and Sweden.[6]

As of 2017, the U.S. has a registered ice hockey population of 637,744 with USA Hockey.[7] USA Hockey is the largest governing body for ice hockey in the U.S. and is considered the best representation of the number of ice hockey players in the country.[8]

History

The American ice hockey team's greatest success was the "Miracle on Ice" at the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York, when American college players defeated the heavily favored seasoned professionals from the Soviet Union on the way to a gold medal. Though ice hockey is not a major sport in most areas of the United States, the "Miracle" is often listed as one of the all-time greatest American sporting achievements. The U.S. also won the gold medal in the 1960 Games at Squaw Valley, California, defeating the Soviet Union, Canada, Czechoslovakia, and Sweden along the way. However, since this victory is not as well known as the 1980 win, it has come to be known as the "Forgotten Miracle".[9][10]

U.S. hockey experienced a spike in talent in the 1980s and 1990s, with future NHL stars including Tony Amonte, Chris Chelios, Derian Hatcher, Brett Hull, Pat LaFontaine, John LeClair, Brian Leetch, Mike Modano, Mike Richter, Jeremy Roenick, Kevin Stevens, Keith Tkachuk, and Doug Weight. Although the U.S. finished no higher than fourth in any World or Olympic event from 1981 through 1994 (unlike other nations, the U.S. was limited to amateurs at these tournaments), the Americans reached the finals of the 1991 Canada Cup and won the 1996 World Cup with a squad of NHL players. Six years later, after the International Olympic Committee and NHL arranged to accommodate an Olympic break in the NHL schedule, the U.S. earned a silver medal at the 2002 Winter Olympics with a roster that included NHL stars Adam Deadmarsh, Chris Drury, Brian Rafalski, and Brian Rolston. However, by 2006, many of these NHL All-Stars had retired or had declined with age. Though the 2006 Olympic team finished a disappointing 8th, it was more of a transitional team, featuring young NHL players like Rick DiPietro, John-Michael Liles, and Jordan Leopold.

The 2010 U.S. Olympic team was composed of much younger and faster players than teams of previous years, including David Backes, Dustin Brown, Jack Johnson, Patrick Kane, Phil Kessel, Zach Parise, Joe Pavelski, Bobby Ryan, Paul Stastny, and Ryan Suter. The team also had a solid group of veterans that included such stars as goalie Ryan Miller, defenseman Brian Rafalski, and team captain Jamie Langenbrunner. The U.S. team upset team Canada 5–3 in the round-robin phase of the tournament and went into the single elimination phase of the tournament as the number-one seeded team. After beating Finland 6–1, the U.S. advanced to the gold medal game, where they lost in overtime 3–2 to Canada to claim the silver medal. The gold medal game between Canada and the U.S. was watched by an estimated 27.6 million U.S. households. This was the most watched hockey game in America since the 1980 "Miracle on Ice" game, including any Stanley Cup final or NHL Winter Classic broadcast.[11]

The NHL pulled out of the Olympics for the 2018 competition in a dispute over insurance and the IOC's ambush marketing restrictions, prohibiting the national teams from inviting any player it held under contract. The American team was put at a particular disadvantage, as more than 25% of NHL players are Americans (in comparison, only 4.5% are Russians). As a result, the U.S. had to enter the tournament with a hastily assembled team of players from European leagues, AHLers on one-way contracts, and college players.[12] The team proved unsuccessful, losing to Slovenia and the Olympic Athletes from Russia in the preliminary round, and being eliminated by the Czechs in the quarterfinals.[13] The OAR team benefited most from NHL's absence and ultimately won the tournament with a team that was composed primarily of SKA Saint Petersburg and HC CSKA Moscow players from the Russia-based KHL and featured ex-NHL all-stars Pavel Datsyuk, Ilya Kovalchuk and Vyacheslav Voynov (all SKA).

Competitive record

Olympic Games

Games[14][15] GP W L T GF GA Coach Captain Round Position
1920 Antwerp 4 3 1 0 52 2 Fellowes, CorneliusCornelius Fellowes
Schooley, RoyRoy Schooley
McCormick, JoeJoe McCormick Silver medal round  Silver
1924 Chamonix 5 4 1 0 73 6 Haddock, WilliamWilliam Haddock Small, IrvingIrving Small Final round  Silver
1928 St. Moritz Did not participate
1932 Lake Placid 6 4 1 1 27 5 Winsor, AlfredAlfred Winsor Chase, JohnJohn Chase Final round  Silver
1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen 8 5 2 1 10 4 Prettyman, AlbertAlbert Prettyman Garrison, JohnJohn Garrison Final round  Bronze
1948 St. Moritz 8 5 3 0 86 33 Garrison, JohnJohn Garrison Harding, GoodwinGoodwin Harding Round-robin DQ
1952 Oslo 8 6 1 1 43 21 Pleban, John E.John E. Pleban Van, AllenAllen Van Round-robin  Silver
1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo 7 5 2 0 33 16 Mariucci, JohnJohn Mariucci Campbell, GeneGene Campbell Final round  Silver
1960 Squaw Valley 7 7 0 0 48 17 Riley, JackJack Riley Kirrane, JackJack Kirrane Final round  Gold
1964 Innsbruck 7 2 5 0 29 33 Jeremiah, EdwardEdward Jeremiah Brooks, HerbHerb Brooks
Reichart, BillBill Reichart
Round-robin 5th
1968 Grenoble 7 2 4 1 23 28 Williamson, MurrayMurray Williamson Nanne, LouLou Nanne Round-robin 6th
1972 Sapporo 6 4 2 0 23 18 Williamson, MurrayMurray Williamson Sheehy, TimTim Sheehy Round-robin  Silver
1976 Innsbruck 6 3 3 0 23 25 Johnson, BobBob Johnson Taft, JohnJohn Taft Round-robin 5th
1980 Lake Placid 7 6 0 1 33 15 Brooks, HerbHerb Brooks Eruzione, MikeMike Eruzione Final round  Gold
1984 Sarajevo 6 2 2 2 23 21 Vairo, LouLou Vairo Verchota, PhilPhil Verchota 7th place game 7th
1988 Calgary 6 3 3 0 35 31 Peterson, DaveDave Peterson Leetch, BrianBrian Leetch 7th place game 7th
1992 Albertville 8 5 2 1 25 19 Peterson, DaveDave Peterson Donatelli, ClarkClark Donatelli Bronze medal game 4th
1994 Lillehammer 8 1 4 3 28 32 Taylor, TimTim Taylor Laviolette, PeterPeter Laviolette 7th place game 8th
1998 Nagano 4 1 3 0 9 14 Wilson, RonRon Wilson Chelios, ChrisChris Chelios Quarterfinals 6th
2002 Salt Lake City 6 4 1 1 26 10 Brooks, HerbHerb Brooks Chelios, ChrisChris Chelios Gold medal game  Silver
2006 Turin 6 1 4 1 16 17 Laviolette, PeterPeter Laviolette Chelios, ChrisChris Chelios Quarterfinals 8th
2010 Vancouver 6 5 1 24 9 Wilson, RonRon Wilson Langenbrunner, JamieJamie Langenbrunner Gold medal game  Silver
2014 Sochi 6 4 2 20 12 Bylsma, DanDan Bylsma Parise, ZachZach Parise Bronze medal game 4th
2018 Pyeongchang 5 2 3 11 12 Granato, TonyTony Granato Gionta, BrianBrian Gionta Quarterfinals 7th

World Championship

Note: Between 1920 and 1968, the Olympic ice hockey tournament was also considered the World Championship for that year.[16]
Note: World War II forced cancellation of all tournaments from 1940 to 1946.
Note: In 1972, a separate tournament was held both for the World Championships and the Winter Olympics for the first time.
Note: No World Championships were held during the Olympic years 1980, 1984, and 1988.
  • 1920 Silver
  • 1924 Silver
  • 1928did not participate
  • 1930did not participate
  • 1931 Silver
  • 1932 Silver
  • 1933 Gold
  • 1934 Silver
  • 1935did not participate
  • 1936 Bronze
  • 1937did not participate
  • 1938 — 7th place
  • 1939 Silver
  • 1947 — 5th place
  • 1948 — 4th place
  • 1949 Bronze
  • 1950 Silver
  • 1951 — 6th place
  • 1952 Silver
  • 1953did not participate
  • 1954did not participate
  • 1955 — 4th place
  • 1956 Silver
  • 1957did not participate
  • 1958 — 5th place
  • 1959 — 4th place
  • 1960 Gold
  • 1961 — 6th place
  • 1962 Bronze
  • 1963 — 8th place
  • 1964 — 5th place
  • 1965 — 6th place
  • 1966 — 6th place
  • 1967 — 5th place
  • 1968 — 6th place
  • 1969 — 6th place (relegated)
  • 1970 — 7th place (1st in Group B, promoted)
  • 1971 — 6th place (relegated)
  • 1972 — 8th place (2nd in Group B)
  • 1973 — 8th place (2nd in Group B)
  • 1974 — 7th place (1st in Group B, promoted)
  • 1975 — 6th place
  • 1976 — 4th place
  • 1977 — 6th place
  • 1978 — 6th place
  • 1979 — 7th place
  • 1981 — 5th place
  • 1982 — 8th place (relegated)
  • 1983 — 9th place (1st in Group B, promoted)
  • 1985 — 4th place
  • 1986 — 6th place
  • 1987 — 7th place
  • 1989 — 6th place
  • 1990 — 5th place
  • 1991 — 4th place
  • 1992 — 7th place
  • 1993 — 6th place
  • 1994 — 4th place
  • 1995 — 6th place
  • 1996 Bronze
  • 1997 — 6th place
  • 1998 — 12th place
  • 1999 — 6th place
  • 2000 — 5th place
  • 2001 — 4th place
  • 2002 — 7th place
  • 2003 — 13th place
  • 2004 Bronze
  • 2005 — 6th place
  • 2006 — 7th place
Games GP W OW OL L GF GA Coach Captain Round Position
Russia 2007 Moscow 7 4 0 1 2 29 20 Mike Sullivan Chris Clark Quarterfinals 5th
Canada 2008 Quebec City, Halifax 7 4 0 0 3 26 17 John Tortorella Jeff Halpern Quarterfinals 6th
Switzerland 2009 Bern, Kloten 9 4 0 2 3 32 28 Ron Wilson Dustin Brown Third place game 4th
Germany 2010 Cologne, Mannheim, Gelsenkirchen 6 2 1 2 1 15 9 Scott Gordon Jack Johnson Relegation round 13th
Slovakia 2011 Bratislava, Košice 7 3 0 1 3 20 24 Scott Gordon Mark Stuart Quarterfinals 8th
Finland Sweden 2012 Helsinki, Stockholm 8 4 2 0 2 34 20 Scott Gordon Jack Johnson Quarterfinals 7th
Sweden Finland 2013 Stockholm, Helsinki 10 7 0 0 3 35 24 Joe Sacco Paul Stastny Third place game 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Belarus 2014 Minsk 8 4 2 0 3 30 27 Peter Laviolette Justin Abdelkader Quarterfinals 6th
Czech Republic 2015 Prague, Ostrava 10 7 1 0 2 28 19 Todd Richards Matt Hendricks Third place game 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Russia 2016 Moscow, St. Petersburg 10 3 1 1 5 29 30 John Hynes Matt Hendricks Third place game 4th
France Germany 2017 Paris, Cologne 8 6 0 0 2 31 16 Blashill, JeffJeff Blashill Murphy, ConnorConnor Murphy Quarterfinals 5th
Denmark 2018 Copenhagen, Herning 10 6 2 0 2 46 25 Blashill, JeffJeff Blashill Kane, PatrickPatrick Kane Third place game 3rd, bronze medalist(s)

Canada Cup/World Cup

Games[17] GP W L T GF GA Coach Captain Round Position
1976 5 1 3 1 14 21 Pulford, BobBob Pulford Group stage 5th
1981 6 2 3 1 18 23 Johnson, BobBob Johnson Semifinals 4th
1984 6 3 2 1 23 22 Johnson, BobBob Johnson Semifinals 4th
1987 5 2 3 0 13 14 Johnson, BobBob Johnson Group stage 5th
1991 8 5 3 0 29 26 Johnson, BobBob Johnson Finals  Silver
1996 7 6 1 0 37 18 Wilson, RonRon Wilson Leetch, BrianBrian Leetch Finals  Gold
2004 5 2 3 0 11 11 Wilson, RonRon Wilson Chelios, ChrisChris Chelios Semifinals 4th
2016 3 0 3 5 11 Tortorella, JohnJohn Tortorella Pavelski, JoeJoe Pavelski Group stage 7th

Team

Current roster

Roster for the 2018 IIHF World Championship.[18][19]

Head coach: Jeff Blashill

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
1 G Keith Kinkaid 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1989-07-04) July 4, 1989 (age 28) United States New Jersey Devils
3 F Nick Bonino 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 89 kg (196 lb) (1988-04-20) April 20, 1988 (age 30) United States Nashville Predators
4 D Will Butcher 1.77 m (5 ft 10 in) 86 kg (190 lb) (1995-01-06) January 6, 1995 (age 23) United States New Jersey Devils
5 D Connor MurphyA 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) 96 kg (212 lb) (1993-03-26) March 26, 1993 (age 25) United States Chicago Blackhawks
7 F Derek Ryan 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 77 kg (170 lb) (1986-12-29) December 29, 1986 (age 31) United States Carolina Hurricanes
12 F Alex DeBrincat 1.71 m (5 ft 7 in) 75 kg (165 lb) (1997-12-18) December 18, 1997 (age 20) United States Chicago Blackhawks
13 F Johnny Gaudreau 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 71 kg (157 lb) (1993-08-13) August 13, 1993 (age 24) Canada Calgary Flames
14 D Nick Jensen 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1990-09-21) September 21, 1990 (age 27) United States Detroit Red Wings
20 F Chris Kreider 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 103 kg (227 lb) (1991-04-30) April 30, 1991 (age 27) United States New York Rangers
21 F Dylan LarkinA 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 86 kg (190 lb) (1996-07-30) July 30, 1996 (age 21) United States Detroit Red Wings
22 F Sonny Milano 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 88 kg (194 lb) (1996-05-12) May 12, 1996 (age 22) United States Columbus Blue Jackets
23 D Alec Martinez 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 97 kg (214 lb) (1991-11-28) November 28, 1991 (age 26) United States Los Angeles Kings
25 F Blake Coleman 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 91 kg (201 lb) (1991-11-28) November 28, 1991 (age 26) United States New Jersey Devils
27 F Anders Lee 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 103 kg (227 lb) (1990-07-03) July 3, 1990 (age 27) United States New York Islanders
29 F Tage Thompson 1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) 91 kg (201 lb) (1997-10-30) October 30, 1997 (age 20) United States St. Louis Blues
33 G Scott Darling 1.98 m (6 ft 6 in) 105 kg (231 lb) (1988-12-22) December 22, 1988 (age 29) United States Carolina Hurricanes
35 G Charlie Lindgren 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 86 kg (190 lb) (1993-12-18) December 18, 1993 (age 24) Canada Montreal Canadiens
36 F Colin White 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 86 kg (190 lb) (1997-01-30) January 30, 1997 (age 21) Canada Ottawa Senators
39 F Brian Gibbons 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (1988-02-26) February 26, 1988 (age 30) United States New Jersey Devils
43 D Quinn Hughes 1.76 m (5 ft 9 in) 76 kg (168 lb) (1999-10-14) October 14, 1999 (age 18) United States Univ. of Michigan
44 D Neal Pionk 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1995-07-29) July 29, 1995 (age 22) United States New York Rangers
73 D Charlie McAvoy 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 94 kg (207 lb) (1997-12-21) December 21, 1997 (age 20) United States Boston Bruins
82 D Jordan Oesterle 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 83 kg (183 lb) (1992-06-25) June 25, 1992 (age 25) United States Chicago Blackhawks
88 F Patrick KaneC 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 80 kg (180 lb) (1988-11-19) November 19, 1988 (age 29) United States Chicago Blackhawks
89 F Cam Atkinson 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 81 kg (179 lb) (1989-06-05) June 5, 1989 (age 28) United States Columbus Blue Jackets

IIHF World Championship directorate awards

The IIHF has given awards for each year's championship tournament to the top goalie, defenseman, and forward (all since 1954), and most valuable player (since 2004). The following American team members have won awards.

See also

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2]
  3. ^ [3]
  4. ^ [4]
  5. ^ [5]
  6. ^ "NHL announces World Cup of Hockey for 2016". The Canadian Press. 2015-01-24. Retrieved January 29, 2015. 
  7. ^ http://www.usahockey.com/page/show/839306-membership-statistics
  8. ^ http://unitedstatesofhockey.com/2014/06/17/u-s-hockey-participation-numbers-for-2013-14/
  9. ^ Burnside, Scott (2010-02-08). "Hockey's miracle before the 'Miracle'". ESPN. Retrieved 2011-10-07. 
  10. ^ "The Morning Skate: The Forgotten Miracle of 1960". New York Times. 2009-12-11. Retrieved 2011-10-07. 
  11. ^ "Hockey Game Seen by 27.6 Million" New York Times, 1 March 2010. Retrieved 1 March 2010
  12. ^ https://www.teamusa.org/News/2018/January/01/New-Look-2018-US-Olympic-Mens-Ice-Hockey-Team-Named-Led-By-2006-Olympian-Brian-Gionta
  13. ^ https://teamusa.usahockey.com/news_article/show/889271?referrer_id=2389102
  14. ^ [6]
  15. ^ https://teamusa.usahockey.com/page/show/2389102-men-s-olympic-teams
  16. ^ https://teamusa.usahockey.com/page/show/2425772-men-s-world-championship
  17. ^ https://teamusa.usahockey.com/page/show/2328360-world-cup-of-hockey
  18. ^ [7]
  19. ^ 2018 IIHF World Championship roster

External links

  • Official website
  • IIHF profile
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