United States Senate elections, 1998

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United States Senate elections, 1998
United States
← 1996 November 3, 1998 2000 →

Class 3 (34 of the 100) seats in the United States Senate
51 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
  Trent Lott official portrait.jpg Tom Daschle, official Senate photo.jpg
Leader Trent Lott Tom Daschle
Party Republican Democratic
Leader's seat Mississippi South Dakota
Seats before 55 45
Seats after 55 45
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 25,346,613 26,768,699
Percentage 46.8% 49.5%
Swing Decrease 2.6% Increase 1.6%
Seats up 15 19
Races won 15 19

1998 Senate election map.svg
Results of the general elections
     Democratic gain      Democratic hold
     Republican gain      Republican hold

Majority leader before election

Trent Lott
Republican

Elected Majority leader

Trent Lott
Republican

The 1998 United States Senate elections were a even contest between the Republican and Democratic parties. While the Democrats had to defend more seats up for election, Republican attacks on the morality of President Bill Clinton failed to connect with voters and anticipated Republican gains did not materialize. The Republicans picked up open seats in Ohio and Kentucky and narrowly defeated Democratic incumbent Carol Moseley Braun (Illinois), but these were cancelled out by the Democrats' gain of an open seat in Indiana and defeats of Republican Senators Al D'Amato (New York) and Lauch Faircloth (North Carolina). The balance of the Senate remained unchanged at 55–45 in favor of the Republicans. With Democrats gaining five seats in the House of Representatives, this marked the first time since 1934 that the out-of-presidency party failed to gain congressional seats in a mid-term election, and the first time since 1822 that the party not in control of the White House failed to gain seats in the mid-term election of a President's second term. These are the last senate elections that resulted in no net change in the balance of power.

Results summary

45 55
Democratic Republican
Parties Breakdown Total Seats Popular Vote
Up Elected Not Up 1996 1998 +/- Vote  %
Republican Party 16 16 39 55 55 0 25,346,613 46.838%
Democratic Party 18 18 27 45 45 0 26,768,699 49.466%
Libertarian Party 419,452 0.775%
Independent 32,025 0.059%
Constitution Party 68,377 0.126%
Independence Party 109,027 0.201%
Green Party 21,861 0.040%
Reform Party 231,064 0.427%
Socialist Workers Party 6,055 0.011%
Conservative Party 274,220 0.507%
Other parties 427,845 0.791%
Scattering, Write-ins, etc. 332,622 0.615%
Total 34 34 66 100 100 - 54,115,051 100.0%

Source: Election Statistics - Office of the Clerk

Gains, losses, and holds

Both Democrats and Republicans gained three seats from the other party, thereby maintaining the same party ratio.

Democratic gains

  1. Indiana: Former Governor Evan Bayh (D) overwhelmingly defeated Fort Wayne mayor Paul Helmke (R) for the seat of retiring Senator Dan Coats (R), which Bayh's father Birch Bayh (D) once held.
  2. New York: Three-term Senator Al D'Amato (R) was defeated in "one of 1998's most high-profile and nastiest races"[1] by eight-term Representative Chuck Schumer (D) of the Brooklyn and Queens-based 9th congressional district.
  3. North Carolina: Trial lawyer John Edwards (D) defeated incumbent Lauch Faircloth (R) in a close race, making Faircloth the fourth incumbent in a row to lose this seat after one term.

Republican gains

  1. Illinois: Democratic Incumbent Carol Moseley Braun, the first African American woman elected to the Senate, was narrowly defeated by conservative state Senator Peter Fitzgerald. Fitzgerald, though better-funded, maintained a low personal profile while the outspoken Moseley Braun was beset by a series of controversies.
  2. Kentucky: Representative Jim Bunning (R) narrowly defeated Representative Scotty Baesler (D) for the seat left open by retiring Democratic Senator Wendell H. Ford. Bunning, a former Major League Baseball pitcher, outspent Baesler heavily in increasingly Republican Kentucky.
  3. Ohio: Governor George Voinovich (R) defeated former Cuyahoga County Commissioner Mary Boyle (D) for the seat of retiring Democratic Senator John Glenn. Voinovich, with an overwhelming advantage in name recognition and funding, maintained a clear lead in the polls in a campaign which turned mostly on his record as governor.

Democratic holds

  1. Arkansas: Former Representative Blanche Lincoln defeated state Senator Fay Boozman by a comfortable margin to keep the seat of retiring Senator Dale Bumpers in Democratic hands. The race was seen as crucial to the Democratic Party's fortunes in Arkansas. Two years prior, in the 1996 elections, Republican Tim Hutchinson was elected to the U.S. Senate and Republican Mike Huckabee ascended to the governorship after Democratic Governor Jim Guy Tucker resigned due to Whitewater-related scandals.[2]
  2. California: Incumbent U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer defeated California State Treasurer Matt Fong after a contentious race. Boxer, a staunch liberal who suffered from low approval ratings, was the most highly targeted Democratic incumbent senator in 1998. Republicans hoped that Fong would appeal to moderates, independents, and his fellow Asian-Americans. Fong pulled ahead of Boxer by early October, but a blitz of negative advertising by Boxer in the final weeks of the campaign that attacked Fong on the issues of abortion and gun control helped boost the incumbent to a 53-43% win.
  3. Nevada: Democrat Harry Reid defeated three-term Republican Representative John Ensign of the 1st district by just 428 votes to win a third term. Reid was made vulnerable by a Republican trend in Nevada's demographics and the unpopularity of President Bill Clinton in the state. Reid went on to serve as Senate Majority Leader, while Ensign was elected to the Senate in 2000.
  4. South Carolina: Veteran Democratic Senator Fritz Hollings held back a strong challenge from Republican Congressman Bob Inglis. Inglis later won back his old House seat after his Republican successor Jim DeMint was elected to the Senate after Hollings' retirement in 2004.
  5. Washington: Incumbent Senator Patty Murray defeated conservative Republican Congresswoman Linda Smith.
  6. Wisconsin: Incumbent Senator Russ Feingold narrowly defeated Republican U.S. Representative Mark Neumann. Feingold, a leading proponent of campaign finance reform, angered national Democrats by placing self-imposed limits on his campaign spending, but nevertheless spent about $400,000 more on the race than Neumann.

Republican holds

  1. Colorado: Incumbent Republican Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell defeated Dottie Lamm, a columnist for The Denver Post and the wife of former Governor Dick Lamm, by a wide margin. It was Campbell's first race as a Republican, as he had been elected to the Senate in 1992 as a Democrat, but switched parties in 1995 after the 1994 Republican takeover of both houses of Congress.
  2. Georgia: Incumbent Republican Senator Paul Coverdell defeated Michael Coles, the millionaire founder of the Great American Cookie, in a close race.
  3. Missouri: Incumbent Republican Senator Kit Bond defeated Missouri Attorney General Jay Nixon, who would be elected Governor ten years later.

Change in Senate composition

Before the elections

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27
Ran
D28
Ran
D29
Ran
D30
Ran
D40
Ran
D39
Ran
D38
Ran
D37
Ran
D36
Ran
D35
Ran
D34
Ran
D33
Ran
D32
Ran
D31
Ran
D41
Ran
D42
Ran
D43
Retired
D44
Retired
D45
Retired
R55
Retired
R54
Retired
R53
Ran
R52
Ran
R51
Ran
Majority →
R41
Ran
R42
Ran
R43
Ran
R44
Ran
R45
Ran
R46
Ran
R47
Ran
R48
Ran
R49
Ran
R50
Ran
R40 R39 R38 R37 R36 R35 R34 R33 R32 R31
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

After the general elections

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27
Re-elected
D28
Re-elected
D29
Re-elected
D30
Re-elected
D40
Re-elected
D39
Re-elected
D38
Re-elected
D37
Re-elected
D36
Re-elected
D35
Re-elected
D34
Re-elected
D33
Re-elected
D32
Re-elected
D31
Re-elected
D41
Re-elected
D42
Re-elected
D43
Gain
D44
Gain
D45
Gain
R55
Gain
R54
Gain
R53
Gain
R52
Re-elected
R51
Re-elected
Majority →
R41
Re-elected
R42
Re-elected
R43
Re-elected
R44
Re-elected
R45
Re-elected
R46
Re-elected
R47
Re-elected
R48
Re-elected
R49
Re-elected
R50
Re-elected
R40 R39 R38 R37 R36 R35 R34 R33 R32 R31
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10
Key:
D# Democratic
R# Republican

Race summary

Special elections during the 105th Congress

There were no special elections in 1998 or 1999 during the 105th Congress.

Elections leading to the next Congress

In these general elections, the winners were elected for the term beginning January 3, 1993; ordered by state.

All of the elections involved the Class 3 seats.

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Alabama Shelby, RichardRichard Shelby Republican 1986
1992
1998
2004
2010
2016
Incumbent re-elected. Richard Shelby (Republican) 63.2%
Clayton Suddith (Democratic) 36.7%
Alaska Murkowski, FrankFrank Murkowski Republican 1980
1986
1992
Incumbent re-elected. Frank Murkowski (Republican) 74.5%
Joe Sonneman (Democratic) 19.7%
Jeffrey Gottlieb (Green) 3.2%
Scott Kohlhaas (Libertarian) 2.3%
Arizona McCain, JohnJohn McCain Republican 1986
1992
Incumbent re-elected. John McCain (Republican) 68.7%
Ed Ranger (Democratic) 27.2%
John C. Zajac (Libertarian) 2.3%
Bob Park (Reform) 1.8%
Arkansas Bumpers, DaleDale Bumpers Democratic 1974
1980
1986
1992
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic hold
Blanche Lincoln (Democratic) 55.1%
Fay Boozman (Republican) 42.2%
Charley E. Heffley (Reform) 2.7%
California Boxer, BarbaraBarbara Boxer Democratic 1992 Incumbent re-elected. Barbara Boxer (Democratic) 53%
Matt Fong (Republican) 43%
Ted Brown (Libertarian) 1.1%
Timothy R. Erich (Reform) 1%
H. Joseph Perrin, Sr. (American Independent) 0.7%
Ophie C. Beltran (Peace & Freedom) 0.6%
Brian M. Rees (Natural Law) 0.6%
Colorado Campbell, Ben NighthorseBen Nighthorse Campbell Republican 1992 Incumbent re-elected. Ben Nighthorse Campbell (Republican) 62.5%
Dottie Lamm (Democratic) 35%
David S. Segal (Libertarian) 1%
Kevin Swanson (American Constitution) 0.7%
Jeff Peckman (Natural Law) 0.3%
John Heckman (Concerns of People) 0.2%
Gary Swing (Pacifist) 0.1%
Connecticut Dodd, ChrisChris Dodd Democratic 1980
1986
1992
Incumbent re-elected. Chris Dodd (Democratic) 65.1%
Gary Franks (Republican) 32.4%
William Kozak (Concerned Citizens) 1.3%
Lois A. Grasso (Term Limits) 0.7%
Wildey Moore (Libertarian) 0.5%
Florida Graham, BobBob Graham Democratic 1986
1992
Incumbent re-elected. Bob Graham (Democratic) 62.5%
Charlie Crist (Republican) 37.5%
Georgia Coverdell, PaulPaul Coverdell Republican 1992 Incumbent re-elected. Paul Coverdell (Republican) 52.3%
Michael Coles (Democratic) 45.3%
Bertil Armin Loftman (Libertarian) 2.5%
Hawaii Inouye, DanielDaniel Inouye Democratic 1962
1968
1974
1980
1986
1992
Incumbent re-elected. Daniel Inouye (Democratic) 79.2%
Crystal Young (Republican) 17.8%
Lloyd Mallan (Libertarian) 3%
Idaho Kempthorne, DirkDirk Kempthorne Republican 1992 Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican hold
Mike Crapo (Republican) 69.5%
Bill Mauk (Democratic) 28.4%
George J. Mansfeld (Natural Law) 2%
Illinois Moseley Braun, CarolCarol Moseley Braun Democratic 1992 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain
Peter Fitzgerald (Republican) 50.3%
Carol Moseley Braun (Democratic) 47.4%
Don A. Torgersen (Reform) 2.2%
Raymond W. Stalker (U.S. Taxpayers) 0.01%
Indiana Coats, DanDan Coats Republican 1989 (Appointed)
1990 (Special)
1992
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain
Evan Bayh (Democratic) 63.7%
Paul Helmke (Republican) 34.8%
Rebecca Sink-Burris (Libertarian) 1.5%
Iowa Grassley, ChuckChuck Grassley Republican 1980
1986
1992
Incumbent re-elected. Chuck Grassley (Republican) 68.4%
David Osterberg (Democratic) 30.5%
Susan Marcus (Natural Law) 0.8%
Margaret Trowe (Socialist Workers) 0.3%
Kansas Brownback, SamSam Brownback Republican 1996 (Special) Incumbent re-elected. Sam Brownback (Republican) 65.3%
Paul Feleciano Jr. (Democratic) 31.6%
Tom Oyler (Libertarian) 1.6%
Alvin Bauman (Reform) 1.5%
Kentucky Ford, WendellWendell Ford Democratic 1974
1974 (Appointed)
1980
1986
1992
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican gain
Jim Bunning (Republican) 49.7%
Scotty Baesler (Democratic) 49.2%
Charles R. Arbegust (Reform) 1.1%
Louisiana Breaux, JohnJohn Breaux Democratic 1986
1992
Incumbent re-elected. John Breaux (Democratic) 64%
Jim Donelon (Republican) 32%
Maryland Mikulski, BarbaraBarbara Mikulski Democratic 1986
1992
Incumbent re-elected. Barbara Mikulski (Democratic) 70.5%
Ross Pierpont (Republican) 29.5%
Missouri Bond, KitKit Bond Republican 1986
1992
Incumbent re-elected. Kit Bond (Republican) 52.7%
Jay Nixon (Democratic) 43.8%
Tamara Millay (Libertarian) 2.0%
Curtis Frazier (U.S. Taxpayers) 1.0%
James F. Newport (Reform) 0.5%
Nevada Reid, HarryHarry Reid Democratic 1986
1992
Incumbent re-elected. Harry Reid (Democratic) 47.9%
John Ensign (Republican) 47.8%
Michael Cloud (Libertarian) 1.9%
None of These Candidates 1.8%
Michael E. Williams (Natural Law) 0.6%
New Hampshire Gregg, JuddJudd Gregg Republican 1992 Incumbent re-elected. Judd Gregg (Republican) 67.8%
George Condodemetraky (Democratic) 28.2%
Brian Christeson (Libertarian) 2.4%
Roy Kendel (Independent) 1.5%
New York D'Amato, AlAl D'Amato Republican 1980
1986
1992
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain
Chuck Schumer (Democratic) 54.6%
Al D'Amato (Republican) 44.1%
Corinne E. Kurtz (Marijuana Reform) 0.7%
Joel Kovel (Green) 0.3%
William P. Mc Millen (Libertarian) 0.2%
Rose Ana Berbeo (Socialist Workers) 0.1%
North Carolina Faircloth, LauchLauch Faircloth Republican 1992 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain
John Edwards (Democratic) 51.2%
Lauch Faircloth (Republican) 47.0%
Barbara Howe (Libertarian) 1.8%
North Dakota Dorgan, ByronByron Dorgan Democratic-NPL 1992 Incumbent re-elected. Byron Dorgan (Democratic) 63.1%
Donna Nalewaja (Republican) 35.2%
Harley McLain (Libertarian) 1.7%
Ohio Glenn, JohnJohn Glenn Democratic 1974
1974 (Appointed)
1980
1986
1992
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican gain
George Voinovich (Republican) 56.5%
Mary Boyle (Democratic) 43.5%
Oklahoma Nickles, DonDon Nickles Republican 1980
1986
1992
Incumbent re-elected. Don Nickles (Republican) 66.4%
Don Carroll (Democratic) 31.3%
Mike Morris (Independent) 1.8%
Argus W. Yandell, Jr. (Independent) 0.5%
Oregon Wyden, RonRon Wyden Democratic 1996 (Special)
1998
Incumbent re-elected. Ron Wyden (Democratic) 61%
John Lim (Republican) 33.8%
Karen Moskowitz (Green) 2.0%
Jim Brewster (Libertarian) 1.6%
Michael A. Campbell (Natural Law) 0.8%
Dean M. Braa (Socialist) 0.7%
Pennsylvania Specter, ArlenArlen Specter Democratic 1980
1986
1992
Incumbent re-elected. Arlen Specter (Republican) 61.3%
Bill Lloyd (Democratic) 34.8%
Dean Snyder (Constitution) 2.3%
Jack Iannantuono (Libertarian) 1.6%
South Carolina Hollings, ErnestErnest Hollings Democratic 1966 (Appointed)
1968
1974
1980
1986
1992
Incumbent re-elected. Ernest Hollings (Democratic) 52.7%
Bob Inglis (Republican) 45.7%
Richard Quillian (Libertarian) 1.6%
South Dakota Daschle, TomTom Daschle Democratic 1986
1992
Incumbent re-elected. Tom Daschle (Democratic) 62.1%
Ron Schmidt (Republican) 36.4%
Byron Dale (Libertarian) 1.4%
Utah Bennett, BobBob Bennett Republican 1992 Incumbent re-elected. Bob Bennett (Republican) 64%
Scott Leckman (Democratic) 33%
Gary R. Van Horn (Independent American) 3%
Vermont Leahy, PatrickPatrick Leahy Democratic 1974
1980
1986
1992
Incumbent re-elected. Patrick Leahy (Democratic) 72.2%
Fred Tuttle (Republican) 22.5%
Hugh Douglas (Libertarian) 2.0%
Barry M. Nelson (Independent) 1.4%
Bob Melamede (Vermont Grassroots) 1.2%
Jerry Levy (Liberty Union) 0.6%
Washington Murray, PattyPatty Murray Democratic 1992 Incumbent re-elected. Patty Murray (Democratic) 58.4%
Linda Smith (Republican) 41.6%
Wisconsin Feingold, RussRuss Feingold Democratic 1992 Incumbent re-elected. Russ Feingold (Democratic) 50.6%
Mark Neumann (Republican) 48.4%
Robert R. Raymond (U.S. Taxpayers) 0.5%
Tom Ender (Libertarian) 0.3%
Eugene A. Hem (Independent) 0.2%

Special elections during the 106th Congress

There were no special elections in 1999 during the 106th Congress.

Alabama

Alabama election
Alabama
← 1992
2004 →
  Richard Shelby official portrait.JPG No image.png
Nominee Richard Shelby Clayton Suddith
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 817,973 474,568
Percentage 63.2% 36.7%

U.S. Senator before election

Richard Shelby
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Richard Shelby
Republican

Incumbent Republican Richard Shelby won re-election to a third term. Shelby had been elected in 1986 and 1992 as a Democrat, but switched to the Republican party in 1994, making this the first election he competed in as a Republican. He beat Democrat Clayton Suddith, an army veteran and former Franklin County Commissioner.[3]

United States Senate election in Alabama, 1998[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Richard Shelby 817,973 63.2%
Democratic Clayton Suddith 474,568 36.7%
Independent Write Ins 864 0.1%

Alaska

Alaska election
Alaska
← 1992
2004 →
  Frank Murkowski, 105th Congress photo.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Frank Murkowski Joseph Sonneman
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 165,227 43,743
Percentage 74.5% 19.7%

U.S. Senator before election

Frank Murkowski
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Frank Murkowski
Republican

Incumbent Republican Frank Murkowski easily won re-election to a fourth term against Democratic nominee Joseph Sonneman, a perennial candidate, earning nearly 75% of the vote.

Open primary results[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Frank Murkowski (Incumbent) 76,649 71.76%
Democratic Joseph Sonneman 10,721 10.04%
Democratic Frank Vondersaar 6,342 5.94%
Republican William L. Hale 6,313 5.91%
Green Jeffrey Gottlieb 4,796 4.49%
Libertarian Scott A. Kohlhaas 1,987 1.86%
Total votes 106,808 100.00%
United States Senate election in Alaska, 1998[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Frank Murkowski (Incumbent) 165,227 74.49% +21.44%
Democratic Joe Sonneman 43,743 19.72% -18.68%
Green Jeffrey Gottlieb 7,126 3.21% -5.14%
Libertarian Scott A. Kohlhaas 5,046 2.27%
Write-ins 665 0.30%
Majority 121,484 54.77% +40.13%
Turnout 221,807
Republican hold

Arizona

Arizona election
Arizona
← 1992
2004 →
  John McCain Official Other Version.jpg No image.png
Nominee John McCain Ed Ranger
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 696,577 275,224
Percentage 68.7% 27.2%

1998 Arizona.png
U.S. Senate election results map.
Red denotes counties won by McCain.

U.S. Senator before election

John McCain
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

John McCain
Republican

Incumbent Republican John McCain won re-election to a third term over Democratic attorney Ed Ranger.[7]

General election result[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican John McCain (Incumbent) 696,577 68.74% +12.93%
Democratic Ed Ranger 275,224 27.16% -4.41%
Libertarian John C. Zajac 23,004 2.27% +0.63%
Reform Bob Park 18,288 1.80%
Write-ins 187 0.02%
Majority 421,353 41.58% +17.34%
Turnout 1,013,280
Republican hold

Arkansas

Arkansas election
Arkansas
← 1992
2004 →
  Blanche Lincoln official portrait.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Blanche Lincoln Fay Boozman
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 385,878 295,870
Percentage 55.1% 42.4%

Arkansas senate 2004.PNG
County Results

U.S. Senator before election

Dale Bumpers
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Blanche Lincoln
Democratic

Incumbent Dale Bumpers retired. U.S. Representative Blanche Lincoln won the open seat.

Democratic Primary results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Blanche Lincoln 145,009 45.5%
Democratic Winston Bryant 87,183 27.4%
Democratic Scott Ferguson 44,761 14.0%
Democratic Nate Coulter 41,848 13.1%
Total votes 318,801 100.00%
Republican Primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Fay Boozman 128,929 78.0%
Republican Tom Prince 44,006 22.0%
Total votes 172,035 100.00%
Arkansas Senate election 1998
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Blanche Lincoln 385,878 55.1%
Republican Fay Boozman 295,870 42.2%
Reform Charley E. Heffley 18,896 2.7%

California

California election
California
← 1992
2004 →
  BarbaraBoxer.jpg Mattfong.jpg
Nominee Barbara Boxer Matt Fong
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 4,411,705 3,576,351
Percentage 53.1% 43.0%

CA1998SenCounties.svg
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Barbara Boxer
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Barbara Boxer
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Barbara Boxer won re-election to a second term.

1998 United States Senate Democratic primary, California
Candidate Votes Percentage
Barbara Boxer (Incumbent) 2,574,264 92.15%%
John Pinkerton 219,250 7.85%%
Total votes 2,793,514 100.00%%
1998 United States Senate Republican primary, California
Candidate Votes Percentage
Matt Fong 1,292,662 45.28%%
Darrell Issa 1,142,567 40.02%%
Frank Riggs 295,886 10.36%%
John M. Brown 48,941 1.71%%
Mark Raus 45,480 1.59%%
Linh Dao 29,241 1.02%%
Total votes 2,854,777 100.00%%
1998 United States Senate primary, California (Others)
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian (Calif.) Ted Brown 67,408 100.00%
Peace and Freedom Ophie C. Beltran 52,306 100.00%
Reform Timothy R. Erich 45,601 100.00%
American Independent Joseph Perrin, Sr. 24,026 100.00%
Natural Law Brian M. Rees 23,945 100.00%

Although the race was predicted[by whom?] to be fairly close, Boxer still defeated Fong by a ten-point margin. Boxer as expected did very well in Los Angeles County, and the San Francisco Bay Area.

1998 United States Senate election, California[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barbara Boxer (Incumbent) 4,410,056 53.06%
Republican Matt Fong 3,575,078 43.01%
Libertarian Ted Brown 93,926 1.13%
Reform Timothy R. Erich 82,918 1.00%
American Independent Joseph Perrin, Sr. 54,699 0.66%
Peace and Freedom Ophie C. Beltran 48,685 0.56%
Natural Law Brian M. Rees 46,543 0.59%
Total votes 8,311,905 100.00%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

Colorado

Colorado election
Colorado
← 1992
2004 →
  BenNCampbell.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Ben Nighthorse Campbell Dottie Lamm
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 829,370 464,754
Percentage 62.5% 35.0%

Colorado 1998 senate.PNG
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Ben Nighthorse Campbell
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Ben Nighthorse Campbell
Republican

Incumbent Republican Ben Nighthorse Campbell won re-election to a second term.

Colorado Democratic primary results[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dottie Lamm 84,929 57.98%
Democratic Gil Romero 61,548 42.02%
Total votes 146,477 100.00%
Colorado Republican primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ben Nighthorse Campbell (Incumbent) 154,702 70.62%
Republican Bill Eggert 64,347 29.38%
Total votes 219,049 100.00%

Campbell, who was elected in 1992 as a Democrat, switched parties after the 1994 Republican Revolution. He faced a primary challenger, but won with over 70% of the vote. In the general election, Democratic nominee Dottie Lamm criticized Campbell of flip flopping from being a moderate liberal to moderate conservative.[11][12] In fact, throughout the entire campaign, Lamm mostly sent out negative attack advertisements about Campbell.[13]

General election[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Ben Nighthorse Campbell (Incumbent) 829,370 62.49% +19.78%
Democratic Dottie Lamm 464,754 35.02% -16.76%
Libertarian David S. Segal 14,024 1.06% +1.06%
Constitution Kevin Swanson 9,775 0.74%
Natural Law Jeffrey Peckham 4,101 0.31%
Independent John Heckman 3,230 0.24%
Independent Gary Swing 1,981 0.15%
Majority 364,616 27.47% +18.40%
Turnout 1,327,235
Republican hold Swing {{{swing}}}

Connecticut

Connecticut election
Connecticut
← 1992
2004 →
  Christopher Dodd official portrait 2-cropped.jpg Gary A. Franks.jpg
Nominee Chris Dodd Gary A. Franks
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 628,306 312,177
Percentage 65.2% 32.4%

Connecticut Election Results by County, all Democratic.svg
County Results

U.S. Senator before election

Chris Dodd
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Chris Dodd
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Chris Dodd won re-election for a fourth term against former Republican U.S. Congressman Gary A. Franks.

Connecticut Senate election 1998[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Chris Dodd 628,306 65.2%
Republican Gary A. Franks 312,177 32.4%
Concerned Citizens William Kozak 12,261 1.3%
Independent Lois A. Grasso 6,517 0.7%
Libertarian Wildey J. Moore 5,196 0.5%

Florida

Florida election
Florida
← 1992
2004 →
  Bob Graham, official Senate photo portrait, color.jpg Charlie Crist official portrait crop.jpg
Nominee Bob Graham Charlie Crist
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 2,436,407 1,463,755
Percentage 62.5% 37.5%

U.S. Senator before election

Bob Graham
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Bob Graham
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Bob Graham won re-election to a third term.

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bob Graham (Incumbent) 909,349 100.00%
Republican Primary results[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Charlie Crist 365,894 66.40%
Republican Andy Martin 184,739 33.60%
Total votes 550,633 100.00%

Graham defeated Crist in a landslide, as Crist won just four counties in the state. There were no third party or independent candidates.

General election results[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Daniel Robert Graham 2,436,407 62.47% -2.93%
Republican Charles Joseph Crist, Jr. 1,463,755 37.53% +2.94%
Majority 972,652 24.94% -5.87%
Turnout 3,900,162 46.84%
Total votes 3,900,162 100.00%
Democratic hold

Georgia

Georgia election
Georgia (U.S. state)
← 1992
2000 →
  Paul Coverdell.PNG No image.svg
Nominee Paul Coverdell Michael Coles
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 918,540 791,904
Percentage 52.37% 45.15%

Georgia Senate 1998.svg
County Results

U.S. Senator before election

Paul Coverdell
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Paul Coverdell
Republican

Incumbent Republican Paul Coverdell won re-election to a second term.[6]

Georgia United States Senate election, 1998
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Paul Coverdell 918,540 52.37%
Democratic Michael Coles 791,904 45.15%
Libertarian Bert Loftman 43,467 2.48%
Socialist Workers Daniel Fein (write-in) 42 0.00%
Majority 126,636 7.22%
Turnout 1,753,953

Hawaii

Hawaii election
Hawaii
← 1992
2004 →
  Daniel Inouye, official Senate photo portrait, 2008.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Daniel Inouye Crystal Young
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 315,252 70,964
Percentage 79.2% 17.8%

Hawaii Election Results by County, all Democratic.svg
County Results

U.S. Senator before election

Daniel Inouye
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Daniel Inouye
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Daniel Inouye won re-election to a seventh term over Republican legislative aide Crystal Young.[15]

General election results[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Daniel Inouye 315,252 79.2%
Republican Crystal Young 70,964 17.8%
Libertarian Lloyd Jeffrey Mallan 11,908 3.0%

Idaho

Idaho election
Idaho
← 1992
2004 →
  Mike Crapo official photo.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Mike Crapo Bill Mauk
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 262,966 107,375
Percentage 69.5% 28.4%

Idaho Rep sweep.PNG
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Dirk Kempthorne
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Mike Crapo
Republican

Incumbent Republican Dirk Kempthorne decided to retire after one term to run for governor. Republican nominee Mike Crapo won the open seat.

Democratic primary results[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Mauk 22,503 100.00%
Total votes 22,503 100.00%
Republican primary results[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Crapo 110,205 87.27%
Republican Matt Lambert 16,075 12.73%
Total votes 126,280 100.00%
General election results[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Mike Crapo 262,966 69.54% +13.01%
Democratic Bill Mauk 107,375 28.39% -15.08%
Natural Law George J. Mansfeld 7,833 2.07%
Majority 155,591 41.14% +28.10%
Turnout 378,174
Republican hold

Illinois

Illinois election
Illinois
← 1992
2004 →
  Peter Fitzgerald cropped.jpg Sen. Carol Moseley Braun.jpg
Nominee Peter Fitzgerald Carol Moseley Braun
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 1,709,042 1,610,496
Percentage 50.4% 47.4%

Illinois Senate election by county, 1998.png
U.S. Senate election results map.
Red denotes counties won by Fitzgerald.
Blue denotes those won by Moseley Braun.

U.S. Senator before election

Carol Moseley Braun
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Peter Fitzgerald
Republican

Incumbent Democrat Carol Moseley Braun decided to run for re-election, despite the number of controversies that she had in during her first term. Republican State Senator Peter Fitzgerald won his party's primary with a slim margin of victory.

He ended up defeating the incumbent, with a margin of victory of approximately 3%. Peter Fitzgerald won all but five counties.

During Moseley Braun's first term as U.S. Senator, she was plagued by several major controversies. Moseley Braun was the subject of a 1993 Federal Elections Commission investigation over $249,000 in unaccounted-for campaign funds. The agency found some small violations, but took no action against Moseley Braun, citing a lack of resources. Moseley Braun only admitted to bookkeeping errors. The Justice Department turned down two requests for investigations from the IRS.[18]

In 1996, Moseley Braun made a private trip to Nigeria, where she met with dictator Sani Abacha. Despite U.S. sanctions against that country, due to Abacha's actions, the Senator did not notify, nor register her trip with, the State Department. She subsequently defended Abacha's human rights records in Congress.[19]

Peter Fitzgerald, a State Senator, won the Republican primary, defeating Illinois Comptroller Loleta Didrickson with 51.8% of the vote, to Didrickson's 48.2%.[20] Fitzgerald spent nearly $7 million in the Republican primary.[21] He had a major financial advantage, as he was a multimillionaire. He ended up spending $12 million in his election victory.[22]

In September, Moseley Braun created controversy again by using the word Nigger to describe how she claims to be a victim of racism.[22]

Most polls over the first few months showed Moseley Braun trailing badly. However, after she was helped in the final month by notable Democrats such as First Lady Hillary Clinton and U.S. Congressman Luis V. Gutierrez, three polls published in the last week showed her within the margin of error, and, in one poll, running even with Fitzgerald.[23]

Moseley Braun was narrowly defeated by Republican Peter Fitzgerald. Moseley Braun only won four of Illinois's 102 counties. Despite this, the race was kept close by Moseley running up massive margins in Cook County, home of Chicago. However it wasn't quite enough to win.

Illinois United States Senate election, 1998[24]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Peter Fitzgerald 1,709,041[25] 50.35%[25] +7.4%
Democratic Carol Moseley Braun (Incumbent) 1,610,496[25] 47.44%[25] -5.6%
Reform Don Torgersen 74,704[25] 2.20%[25] 0.00%
US Taxpayers Raymond Stalker 280[25] 0.01%[25] 0.00%
Majority 98,545 2.91% 0.00%
Turnout 3,394,521
Republican gain from Democratic Swing {{{swing}}}

Indiana

Indiana election
Indiana
← 1992
2004 →
  Evan Bayh official portrait.jpg Paul Helmke.jpg
Nominee Evan Bayh Paul Helmke
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,012,244 552,732
Percentage 63.7% 34.8%

INSenCounties98.png
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Dan Coats
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Evan Bayh
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Dan Coats decided to retire instead of seeking a second full term. Democratic nominee, former Governor Evan Bayh won the open seat his father once held.

General election results[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Evan Bayh 1,012,244 63.7%
Republican Paul Helmke 552,732 34.8%
Libertarian Rebecca Sink-Burris 23,641 1.5%
Majority 459,512
Turnout 1,588,617
Democratic gain from Republican Swing {{{swing}}}

Iowa

Iowa election
Iowa
← 1992
2004 →
  Chuck Grassley official photo.jpg David Osterberg.jpg
Nominee Chuck Grassley David Osterberg
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 648,480 289,049
Percentage 68.41% 30.49%

Iowa Rep sweep.PNG
County Results

U.S. Senator before election

Chuck Grassley
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Chuck Grassley
Republican

Incumbent Republican Chuck Grassley sought re-election to a fourth term in the United States Senate, facing off against former State Representative David Osterberg, who won the Democratic nomination unopposed. Grassley had not faced a competitive election since 1980; this year proved no different, and Grassley crushed Osterberg to win a fourth term.

Democratic primary results[26]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Osterberg 86,064 99.45%
Democratic Write-ins 476 0.55%
Total votes 86,540 100.00%
Republican primary results[26]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chuck Grassley (Incumbent) 149,943 99.72%
Republican Write-ins 419 0.28%
Total votes 150,362 100.00%
United States Senate election in Iowa, 1998[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Chuck Grassley (Incumbent) 648,480 68.41% -1.20%
Democratic David Osterberg 289,049 30.49% +3.29%
Natural Law Susan Marcus 7,561 0.80% -0.47%
Socialist Workers Margaret Trowe 2,542 0.27% +0.16%
Write-ins 275 0.03%
Majority 359,431 37.92% -4.50%
Turnout 947,907
Republican hold

Kansas

Kansas election
Kansas
← 1996
2004 →
  Sam Brownback official portrait 3.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Sam Brownback Paul Feleciano
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 474,639 310,337
Percentage 65.3% 31.6%

Kansas Rep sweep excluding Wyan only.PNG
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Sam Brownback
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Sam Brownback
Republican

Incumbent Republican Sam Brownback won re-election to his first full term. Brownback was first elected in a special election held in 1996, when then-Senator Bob Dole resigned to campaign for U.S. President, after 27 years in the Senate. This would've been Dole's seventh term in office had he remained in his seat.

Democratic primary results[27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Paul Feleciano, Jr. 58,097 58.73%
Democratic Todd Covault 40,825 41.27%
Total votes 98,922 100.00%
Republican Party primary results[27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sam Brownback (Incumbent) 255,747 100.00%
Total votes 255,747 100.00%
General election results[28]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Sam Brownback (Incumbent) 474,639 65.27% +11.35%
Democratic Paul Feleciano, Jr. 229,718 31.59% -11.74%
Libertarian Tom Oyler 11,545 1.59%
Reform Alvin Bauman 11,334 1.56% -1.20%
Majority 244,921 33.68% +23.10%
Turnout 727,236
Republican hold

Kentucky

Kentucky election
Kentucky
← 1992
2004 →
  Jim Bunning official photo.jpg Baesler.jpg
Nominee Jim Bunning Scotty Baesler
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 569,817 563,051
Percentage 49.8% 49.2%

U.S. Senator before election

Wendell Ford
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Jim Bunning
Republican

Incumbent Democratic U.S Senator Wendell Ford decided to retire, instead of seeking a fifth term. Republican Representative Jim Bunning won the open seat.

Republican primary results[30]

Democratic Primary results[29]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Scotty Baesler 194,125 34.16%
Democratic Charlie Owen 166,472 29.29%
Democratic Steve Henry 156,576 27.55%
Democratic Jim Brown 19,975 3.51%
Democratic David L. Williams 16,366 2.88%
Democratic Ken Buchanan Thompson 14,778 2.60%
Total votes 568,292 100.00%
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim Bunning 152,493 74.28%
Republican Barry Metcalf 52,798 25.72%
Total votes 205,291 100.00%
General election results[31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Jim Bunning 569,817 49.75% +13.94%
Democratic Scotty Baesler 563,051 49.16% -13.73%
Reform Charles R. Arbegust 12,546 1.10%
Majority 6,766 0.59% -26.48%
Total votes 1,145,414 100.00%
Republican gain from Democratic Swing {{{swing}}}

Louisiana

Louisiana election
Louisiana
← 1992
2004 →
  John Breaux cropped.jpg No image.svg
Nominee John Breaux Jim Donelon
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 620,502 306,616
Percentage 64.0% 31.6%

Labreaux98.png
Parish Results

U.S. Senator before election

John Breaux
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

John Breaux
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat John Breaux won re-election to a third term. As of 2016, this is the last time the Democrats have won the Class 3 Senate Seat from Louisiana.

Louisiana United States Senate election, 1998
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic John Breaux 620,502 64.0%
Republican Jim Donelon 306,616 31.6%
Independent Raymond Brown 12,203 1.3%
Independent Sam Houston Melton 9,893 1.0%
Independent Darryl Paul Ward 7,964 0.8%
Independent L. D. Knox 6,366 0.7%
Independent Jeffrey H. Diket 3,227 0.3%
Independent Martin A. Rosenthal 2,398 0.3%

Maryland

Maryland election
Maryland
← 1992
2004 →
  Barbara Mikulski.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Barbara Mikulski Ross Pierpont
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,062,810 444,637
Percentage 70.5% 29.5%

U.S. Senator before election

Barbara Mikulski
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Barbara Mikulski
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Barbara Mikulski won re-election to a third term.

Democratic Primary results[32]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barbara A. Mikulski (Incumbent) 349,382 84.36%
Democratic Ann L. Mallory 43,120 10.41%
Democratic Kauko H. Kokkonen 21,658 5.23%
Total votes 414,160 100.00%
Republican Primary results[32]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ross Z. Pierpont 32,691 18.40%
Republican John Taylor 22,855 12.87%
Republican Michael Gloth 19,926 11.22%
Republican Kenneth Wayman 16,505 9.29%
Republican Bradlyn McClanahan 16,439 9.25%
Republican Howard David Greyber 16,177 9.11%
Republican John Stafford 15,031 8.46%
Republican George Liebmann 14,440 8.13%
Republican Barry Steve Asbury 11,881 6.69%
Republican Thomas Scott 11,707 6.59%
Total votes 177,652 100.00%
United States Senate election in Maryland, 1998[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Barbara A. Mikulski (Incumbent) 1,062,810 70.50% -0.51%
Republican Ross Z. Pierpont 444,637 29.50% +0.51%
Majority 618,173 41.01% -1.02%
Total votes 1,507,447 100.00%
Democratic hold

Missouri

Missouri election
Missouri
← 1992
2004 →
  Kit Bond official portrait cropped.jpg Jay Nixon crop.jpg
Nominee Kit Bond Jay Nixon
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 830,625 690,208
Percentage 52.7% 43.8%

U.S. Senator before election

Kit Bond
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Kit Bond
Republican

Incumbent Republican Kit Bond won re-election to a third term.[6]

General election results
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Kit Bond 830,625 52.68%
Democratic Jay Nixon 690,208 43.77%
Libertarian Tamara Millay 31,876 2.02%
Constitution Curtis Frazier 15,368 0.98%
Reform James Newport 8,780 0.56%
Majority 140,417 8.90%
Turnout 1,576,857

Nevada

Nevada election
Nevada
← 1992
2004 →
  Harry Reid official portrait.jpg John Ensign official portrait.jpg
Nominee Harry Reid John Ensign
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 208,621 208,220
Percentage 47.9% 47.8%

98NVSenateCounties.PNG
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Harry Reid
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Harry Reid
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Harry Reid won re-election to a third term.

Republican primary results[33]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Ensign 105,263 80.57%
Republican Ralph W. Stephens 13,679 10.47%
Republican None of these candidates 11,704 8.96%
Total votes 130,646 100.00%

Reid won in a close election by 401 votes -- even closer than Tim Johnson's Senate run in South Dakota in 2002, when he narrowly defeated Congressman John Thune by 524 votes. Ensign did not contest the results, and Reid won the race.

General election results[34]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Harry Reid (Incumbent) 208,650 47.88% -3.19%
Republican John Ensign 208,222 47.78% +7.56%
Libertarian Michael Cloud 8,129 1.87% +0.41%
None of These Candidates 8,113 1.86% -0.79%
Natural Law Michael E. Williams 2,781 0.64% -0.83%
Majority 401 0.09% -10.74%
Turnout 435,864
Democratic hold

New Hampshire

New Hampshire election
New Hampshire
← 1992
2004 →
  Gregg-official-photo-closeup.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Judd Gregg George Condodemetraky
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 213,477 88,883
Percentage 67.8% 28.2%

New Hampshire R Sweep.svg
County Results

U.S. Senator before election

Judd Gregg
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Judd Gregg
Republican

Incumbent Republican Judd Gregg won re-election to his second term.

General election results[35]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Judd Gregg 213,477 67.8%
Democratic George Condodemetraky 88,883 28.2%
Libertarian Brian Christeson 7,603 2.4%
Independent American Roy Kendel 4,733 1.5%

New York

New York election
New York (state)
← 1992
2004 →
  Charles Schumer official portrait.jpg Alfonse D'Amato.jpg
Nominee Chuck Schumer Al D'Amato
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 2,551,065 2,058,988
Percentage 54.6% 44.1%

NewYorkSenatorial1998.svg
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Al D'Amato
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Chuck Schumer
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Al D'Amato was running for re-election to a fourth term, but lost to Chuck Schumer in what was considered by many to be the "high[est] profile and nastiest" contest of the year.[36]

Geraldine Ferraro, former U.S. Representative and nominee for Vice President in 1984, was well known for having been the 1984 Democratic vice presidential nominee and had also run but lost in the Democratic primary in the 1992 U.S. Senate election in New York. Mark Green, New York City Public Advocate, and nominee in 1986 had been the Democratic nominee in the 1986 election, but lost in the general election to D'Amato.

At the start of 1998, Ferraro had done no fundraising, out of fear of conflict of interest with her job hosting the CNN program Crossfire, but was nonetheless perceived as the front-runner by virtue of her name recognition;[37] indeed, December and January polls had her 25 percentage points ahead of Green in the race and even further ahead of Schumer.[38][39] Unlike her previous campaigns, Ferraro's family finances never became an issue in 1998.[38] However, she lost ground during the summer, with Schumer catching her in the polls by early August and then soon passing her.[40] Schumer, a tireless fundraiser, outspent her by a five-to-one margin, and Ferraro failed to establish a political image current with the times.[38][41] In the September 15, 1998, primary, she was beaten soundly by Schumer with a 51 percent to 26 percent margin.[38] Unlike the bitter 1992 Democratic senatorial primary, this contest was not divisive, and Ferraro and third-place finisher Green endorsed Schumer at a unity breakfast the following day.[42]

The primaries were held on September 15, 1998.

Democratic primary for New York United States Senate election, 1998[43]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Chuck Schumer 388,701 50.84%
Democratic Geraldine Ferraro 201,625 26.37%
Democratic Mark J. Green 145,819 19.07%
Democratic Eric Ruano-Melendez 28,493 3.73%
Independence Party primary for New York United States Senate election, 1998[44]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independence Chuck Schumer 2,562 58.04%
Independence Mark Green 1,852 41.96%

During the general campaign, D'Amato attempted to brand Schumer as a diehard liberal, while Schumer accused D'Amato of being a liar. When D'Amato's first strategy failed, D'Amato attacked his opponent's attendance record as a member of Congress, which Schumer refuted.[46][47]Late in the campaign, D'Amato called Schumer a "putzhead" in a private meeting with Jewish supporters ("putz" is Yiddishfor penis, and can be slang for "fool").[48]The senator later apologized.[36]In the last days of the campaign, D'Amato campaigned with popular GovernorGeorge Pataki, who was also running for re-election, and was also supported by New York City MayorRudy Giulianiand former Mayor Ed Koch(a Democrat)[48]Vice PresidentAl Goreand First LadyHillary Clintonpersonally campaigned for Schumer, as D'Amato was a prominent critic of PresidentBill Clinton[46]who led the investigation into Whitewater.[49]Though the Republican party was well organized, the Democratic party benefited from robocallsfrom President Clinton and mobilization from two big unions, United Federation of Teachersand 1199.[46]Though D'Amato was effective in obtaining federal government funds for New York State projects during his Senate career, he failed to capitalize on this in the election.[46]Also, Schumer was a tenacious fund-raiser and was aggressive in his attacks.[49]The candidates spent $30 million during the race.[46]The race was not close with Schumer defeating the incumbent D'Amato by just over 10%. D'Amato did win a majority of New York's counties, but his wins were in less populated areas. Schumer's win is attributed to strong performance in New York City. Schumer also performed well in heavily populated upstate cities, like Buffalo, Syracuse, Rochester, and Albany. New York United States Senate election, 1998

Right to Life Party primary for New York United States Senate election, 1998[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Right to Life Al D'Amato 3,798 63.07%
Right to Life Thomas Drolesky 2,224 36.93%
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Chuck Schumer 2,386,314
Independence Chuck Schumer 109,027
Liberal (N.Y.) Chuck Schumer 55,724
Total Chuck Schumer 2,551,065 54.62%
Republican Al D'Amato 1,680,203
Conservative (N.Y.) Al D'Amato 274,220
Right to Life Party (New York) Al D'Amato 104,565
Total Al D'Amato (Incumbent) 2,058,988 44.08%
Marijuana Reform Party Corinne Kurtz 34,281 0.73%
Green Joel Kovel 14,735 0.32%
Libertarian William McMillen 8,223 0.18%
Socialist Workers Rose Ana Berbeo 3,513 0.08%
Majority
Turnout
Democratic gain from Republican
Per New York State law, Schumer and D'Amato totals include minor party line votes: Independence Party and Liberal Party for Schumer, Right to Life Party for D'Amato.

North Carolina

North Carolina election
North Carolina
← 1992
2004 →
  John Edwards, official Senate photo portrait.jpg Lauch Faircloth.jpg
Nominee John Edwards Lauch Faircloth
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,029,237 945,943
Percentage 51.15% 47.01%

NC senate 1998.PNG
County Results

U.S. Senator before election

Lauch Faircloth
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

John Edwards
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Lauch Faircloth decided to seek re-election to a second term, but was unseated by Democrat John Edwards.[6]

In the Democratic primary, Edwards defeated D.G. Martin, Ella Scarborough, and several minor candidates. In the Republican primary, Faircloth easily defeated two minor candidates.[50]

North Carolina United States Senate election, 1998
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic John Edwards 1,029,237 51.15%
Republican Lauch Faircloth (Incumbent) 945,943 47.01%
Libertarian Barbara Howe 36,963 1.84%
Majority 83,294 4.14%
Turnout 2,012,143

North Dakota

North Dakota election
North Dakota
← 1992
2004 →
  Byron Dorgan, official photo portrait 2.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Byron Dorgan Donna Nalewaja
Party Democratic-NPL Republican
Popular vote 134,747 75,013
Percentage 63.2% 35.2%

ND Demo sweep.svg
County Results

U.S. Senator before election

Byron Dorgan
Democratic-NPL

Elected U.S. Senator

Byron Dorgan
Democratic-NPL

Incumbent NPL–Democrat Byron Dorgan won re-election to a second term.[51]

Republican Donna Nalewaja, State Senator's campaign focused on the suggestion that Dorgan had served in the United States Congress for nearly 20 years, and had accomplished relatively little. Dorgan and Nalewaja won the primary elections for their respective parties. McLain had previously run for North Dakota's other senate seat in 1980 against incumbent Mark Andrews.

1998 United States Senate election, North Dakota
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic-NPL Byron Dorgan (Incumbent) 134,747 63.16%
Republican Donna Nalewaja 75,013 35.16%
Independent Harley McLain 3,598 1.69%
Majority
Turnout 213,358

Ohio

Ohio election
Ohio
← 1992
2004 →
  George Voinovich, official photo portrait, 2006.jpg No image.svg
Nominee George Voinovich Mary Boyle
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 1,922,087 1,482,054
Percentage 56.5% 43.5%

Ohio US Senate Election Results by County, 1998.svg
County results

U.S. Senator before election

John Glenn
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

George Voinovich
Republican

Incumbent Democratic U.S Senator John Glenn decided to retire, instead of seeking a fifth term. Republican Governor George Voinovich won the open seat.

General election results[52]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican George V. Voinovich 1,922,087 56.5%
Democratic Mary Boyle 1,482,054 43.5%

Oklahoma

Oklahoma election
Oklahoma
← 1992
2004 →
  Don Nickles.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Don Nickles Don Carroll
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 570,682 268,898
Percentage 66.4% 31.3%

U.S. Senator before election

Don Nickles
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Don Nickles
Republican

Incumbent Republican Don Nickles won re-election to his fourth term.

OK U.S. Senate Election, 1998[53]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Don Nickles 570,682 66.4%
Democratic Don Carroll 268,898 31.3%
Independent Mike Morris 15,516 1.8%
Independent Argus W. Jr. Yandell 4,617 0.4%

Oregon

Oregon election
Oregon
2004 →
  Ron Wyden official portrait.jpg Johnlim.jpg
Nominee Ron Wyden John Lim
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 682,425 377,739
Percentage 61.1% 33.8%

Oregon gubernatorial election, 1998.svg
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Ron Wyden
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Ron Wyden
Democratic

Incumbent Democratic Ron Wyden won re-election to his first full term, defeating Republican nominee John Lim, a state senator.

General election results[54]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Ron Wyden 682,425 61.05% +13.27%
Republican John Lim 377,739 33.79% -12.47%
Pacific Green Karyn Moskowitz 22,024 1.97% +1.37%
Libertarian Jim Brewster 18,221 1.63% +0.32%
Natural Law Michael A. Campbell 8,372 0.75% +0.75%
Socialist Dean M. Braa 7,553 0.68% +.02%
Write-In Misc. 1,413 0.13% -1.12%
Majority 304,686 27.26% +25.74
Turnout 1,117,747
Democratic hold

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania election
Pennsylvania
← 1992
2004 →
  Arlen Specter official portrait.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Arlen Specter Bill Lloyd
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 1,814,180 1,028,839
Percentage 61.3% 34.8%

Pennsylvania Senatorial Election Results by County, 1998.svg
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Arlen Specter
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Arlen Specter
Republican

Incumbent Republican Arlen Specter won re-election to a fourth term.

Leading up to this campaign, the state Democratic Party was in dire straits, as it was plagued by prior corruption allegations of several key legislators and by a lack of fund-raising. Just as in the accompanying gubernatorial race, the party had difficulty in finding a credible candidate. State Representative Bill Lloyd, State Representative[55], who was a well-respected party leader but who had almost zero statewide name recognition, was considered[by whom?] to be a sacrificial lamb candidate. Specter ran a straightforward campaign and attempted to avoid mistakes, while Lloyd's bid was so underfunded that he was unable to air a single commercial until two weeks before the election. Lloyd's strategy was to portray Republicans as hyper-partisan in wake of their attempt to impeach President Bill Clinton, but he was unable to gain any traction with his message. On Election Day, Specter's win was by the second-largest margin in the history of Senate elections in Pennsylvania. He won in two counties: almost uniformly Democratic Philadelphia and his home county, rural and typically Republican Somerset County.[56]

General election results[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Arlen Specter 1,814,180 61.3%
Democratic Bill Lloyd 1,028,839 34.8%
Constitution Dean Snyder 68,377 2.3%
Libertarian Jack Iannantuono 46,103 1.6%

South Carolina

South Carolina election
South Carolina
← 1992
2004 →
  FritzHollings.jpg Rep. Bob Inglis, 109th Congress.jpg
Nominee Ernest Hollings Bob Inglis
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 562,791 488,132
Percentage 52.68% 45.69%

South Carolina 1998 Senate Election.png
County Results by margin of victory

U.S. Senator before election

Ernest Hollings
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Ernest Hollings
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Fritz Hollings won re-election to his sixth full term. As of 2016, this is the last Senate election in South Carolina won by a Democrat.

South Carolina U.S. Senate Election Primary, 1998
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Bob Inglis 115,029 74.6%
Republican Stephen Brown 33,530 21.7%
Republican Elton Legrand 5,634 3.7%

The race between Hollings and Bob Inglis, U.S. Representative gave the voters a choice of two very different visions of and for South Carolina. Hollings was from the Lowcountry, a face of the Old New South, and secured a large amount of federal funds for the state. On the other hand, Inglis came from the Upstate, was a face of the New New South, and opposed to pork barrel spending. Hollings viciously attacked Inglis on the campaign trail as a "goddamn skunk" and when Inglis requested that Hollings sign a pledge for campaign courtesy, Hollings replied that Inglis could "kiss his fanny." Inglis tried to tie Hollings to President Clinton, who had been tainted by the Lewinsky scandal.

Ultimately, Hollings won the race for four crucial reasons. First, Inglis refused to accept PAC donations which allowed Hollings to enjoy a huge financial advantage and blanket the state with his television advertisements. Secondly, Inglis came from the Upstate which already provided GOP majorities whereas Hollings came from the Lowcountry which was a key tossup region in the state. Thirdly, the voters two years prior in the 1996 Senate election had rewarded Strom Thurmond for his long service to the state and it was unlikely that they would then deny re-election to Hollings. Finally, the 1998 South Carolina GOP ticket was dragged down with unpopular Governor David Beasley at the top of the ticket who would go on to lose his re-election campaign to Jim Hodges.

South Carolina U.S. Senate Election, 1998
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Fritz Hollings 562,791 52.7% +2.6%
Republican Bob Inglis 488,132 45.7% -1.2%
Libertarian Richard T. Quillian 16,987 1.6% -0.3%
No party Write-Ins 457 0.0% -0.1%
Majority 74,659 7.0% +3.8%
Turnout 1,068,367 52.8%
Democratic hold

South Dakota

South Dakota election
South Dakota
← 1992
2004 →
  Tom Daschle, official Senate photo.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Tom Daschle Ron Schmidt
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 162,884 95,431
Percentage 62.1% 36.4%

98Daschle.png
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Tom Daschle
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Tom Daschle
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Tom Daschle won re-election to a third term. As of 2017, this is the last time the Democrats have won the Class 3 Senate Seat from South Dakota.

Republican primary results[57]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ron Schmidt 26,540 52.01%
Republican Alan Aker 19,200 37.62%
Republican John M. Sanders 5,292 10.37%
Total votes 51,032 100.00%
General election results[58]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Tom Daschle (Incumbent) 162,884 62.14% -2.76%
Republican Ron Schmidt 95,431 36.41% +3.90%
Libertarian Byron Dale 3,796 1.45% +0.15%
Majority 67,453 25.73% -6.66%
Turnout 262,111
Democratic hold

Utah

Utah election
Utah
← 1992
2004 →
  Robert Foster Bennett, US Senator.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Bob Bennett Scott Leckman
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 316,652 177,459
Percentage 64.0% 33.0%

U.S. Senator before election

Bob Bennett
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Bob Bennett
Republican

Incumbent Republican Bob Bennett won re-election to a second term.

General election results[59]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Bob Bennett (Incumbent) 316,652 63.98% +8.60%
Democratic Scott Leckman 163,172 32.97% -6.74%
Independent American Gary Van Horn 15,073 3.05%
Write-ins 12 0.00%
Majority 153,480 31.01% +15.34%
Turnout 494,909
Republican hold

Vermont

Vermont election
Vermont
← 1992
2004 →
  Patrick Leahy official photo.jpg Fred tuttle.jpg
Nominee Patrick Leahy Fred Tuttle
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 154,567 48,051
Percentage 72.2% 22.5%

Vermont Election Results by County, all Democratic.svg
County Results

U.S. Senator before election

Patrick Leahy
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Patrick Leahy
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Patrick Leahy won re-election to a fifth term.[60]

Notably, the Republican nominee, dairy farmer and actor Fred Tuttle, withdrew from the race and endorsed Leahy, asking Vermonters to vote for his Democratic opponent because he hated Washington DC and he was, as his wife had previously said publicly, unqualified to serve as a United States Senator. His campaign, which had been conducted primarily from his front porch in Tunbridge, VT, spent only $251 during the election season and featured the slogans "Spread Fred!" and "Why Not?" In spite of this, Tuttle still received 48,051 votes, or 22% of the total. [61]

Democratic primary results[62]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patrick Leahy (Incumbent) 18,643 96.65%
Democratic Write-ins 647 3.35%
Total votes 19,290 100.00%
Grassroots Party primary results[62]
Party Candidate Votes %
Grassroots Bob Melamede 137 59.57%
Grassroots Write-ins 93 40.43%
Total votes 230 100.00%
Republican primary results[62]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Fred Tuttle 28,355 53.69%
Republican Jack McMullen 23,321 44.16%
Republican Write-ins 1,137 2.15%
Total votes 52,813 100.00%
General election results[63]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Patrick Leahy (Incumbent) 154,567 72.22% +18.05%
Republican Fred Tuttle 48,051 22.45% -20.90%
Libertarian Hugh Douglas 4,199 1.96%
Independent Barry Nelson 2,893 1.35%
Grassroots Robert Melamede 2,459 1.15%
Liberty Union Jerry Levy 1,238 0.58% -1.21%
Write-ins 629 0.29%
Majority 106,516 49.77% +38.95%
Turnout 214,036
Democratic hold

Washington

Washington election
Washington (state)
← 1992
2004 →
  Patty Murray official portrait.jpg LindaSmithWA.jpg
Nominee Patty Murray Linda Smith
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,103,184 785,377
Percentage 58.4% 41.6%

1998 Washington senate race map.png
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Patty Murray
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Patty Murray
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Patty Murray won re-election to a second term.

General election results[64]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic (Wash.) Patty Murray (Incumbent) 1,103,184 58.4%
Republican (Wash.) Linda Smith 785,377 41.6%
Total votes 1,888,561 100.00%
Voter turnout  %

Wisconsin

Wisconsin election
Wisconsin
← 1992
2004 →
  Russ Feingold official photo 2.jpg MarkNeumann.jpg
Nominee Russ Feingold Mark Neumann
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 890,059 852,272
Percentage 50.5% 48.4%

98WISenateElections.PNG
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Russ Feingold
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Russ Feingold
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Russ Feingold won re-election to a second term. In September 1997, Mark Neumann, a Republican U.S. Representative, announced his candidacy for the United States Senate against Russell Feingold. Both candidates had similar views on the budget surplus, although Neumann was for banning partial-birth abortion while Feingold was against a ban. Both candidates limited themselves to $3.8 million in campaign spending ($1 for every citizen of Wisconsin), although outside groups spent more than $2 million on Neumann; Feingold refused to have outside groups spend their own 'soft money' on his behalf.[65][66] Feingold defeated Neumann by a slim 2% margin in the election. According to the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Neumann had a 30,000 vote margin outside Milwaukee County, but was overwhelmed by a 68,000 vote margin in Milwaukee County.[67]

General election results
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Russ Feingold 890,059 50.55%
Republican Mark Neumann 852,272 48.40%
U.S. Taxpayers Robert R. Raymond 7,942 0.45%
Libertarian Tom Ender 5,591 0.32%
Independent Eugene A. Hem 4,266 0.24%
Write-In Votes 706 0.04%
Majority 37,787 2.15%
Turnout 1,760,836
Democratic hold

See also

References

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External links

  • JoinCalifornia 1998 General Election
  • SmartVoter.org page on the California Senate race.
  • 1998 North Dakota U.S. Senate Election results
  • Crowley, Candy (October 27, 1998). "S.C. Senate race pits old South against new". CNN. Retrieved January 30, 2008. 
  • Crowley, Candy; Stuart Rothenberg (November 3, 1998). "Incumbent Hollings wins close race in South Carolina". CNN. Retrieved January 30, 2008. 
  • Plotz, David (October 22, 1998). "Foghorn Leghorn Meets an Owl". Slate. Retrieved January 30, 2008. 
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