United States Senate elections, 1986

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United States Senate elections, 1986
United States
← 1984 November 4, 1986 1988 →

Class 3 (34 of the 100) seats in the United States Senate
51 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
  Robert C. Byrd – 1977.jpg 1981 Dole p49 (cropped).jpg
Leader Robert Byrd Bob Dole
Party Democratic Republican
Leader since January 3, 1977 January 3, 1985
Leader's seat West Virginia Kansas
Seats before 47 53
Seats after 55 45
Seat change Increase 8 Decrease 8
Popular vote 24,347,369 23,126,219
Percentage 50.1% 47.6%
Swing Increase 0.3% Decrease 1.7%
Seats up 12 24
Races won 20 16

1986 Senate election map.svg
Results
     Democratic gain      Democratic hold
     Republican gain      Republican hold

Majority leader before election

Bob Dole
Republican

Elected Majority leader

Robert Byrd
Democratic

The United States Senate elections, 1986 was an election for the United States Senate in the middle of Ronald Reagan's second presidential term. The Republicans had to defend an unusually large number of freshman Senate incumbents who had been elected on President Ronald Reagan's coattails in 1980. Democrats won a net of eight seats, defeating seven freshman incumbents and regaining control of the Senate for the first time since January 1981. The party not controlling the presidency gained seats, as usually occurs in mid-term elections.

Results summary

55 45
Democratic Republican

Shading indicates party with largest share of that line.

Parties Total
Democratic Republican Conservative Independent Libertarian Other
Last election: 1984 47 53 0 0 0 0 100
Before this election 47 53 0 0 0 0 100
Not up 35 31 0 0 0 0 66
Up 12 22 0 0 0 0 34
Incumbent
retired
Replaced by other party 2 1 3
Held by same party 1 2 3
Incumbent
ran
Won re-election 9 12 21
Lost re-election 0 7 7
Lost renomination,
but held by same party
0 0 0
Summary Total won 11 13 24
Total lost 1 9 9
Total picked-up 9 1 10
Change Increase 8 Decrease 8 Steady Steady Steady Steady Steady
Elected 20 14 0 0 0 0 34
Popular
vote
Votes 24,347,369 23,126,219 212,101 155,032 104,338 665,946 48,611,005
Share 50.1% 47.6% 0.4% 0.3% 0.2% 1.4% 100%
Result 55 45 0 0 0 0 100

Democratic gains

Democrats gained a net of eight seats, and recaptured control of the Senate from the Republicans with a 55–45 majority. Robert Dole (R-Kansas) and Robert C. Byrd (D-West Virginia) exchanged positions as the Majority Leader and the Minority Leader.

This was the last election — until 2016 — in which the Democrats in this Class of Senators (1/3 of the Senate) amassed a gain in seats (not including special elections held in off-years in some states to fill the seats that had been vacated by Senators due to death, resignation, or otherwise).

Republican gain

The only gain by the Republican Party was for one "open seat" in Missouri. On the other hand, the Democratic Party gained the "open seats" in Maryland and Nevada, and the Democrats also defeated seven incumbent Republican Senators, six of them who were first-term senators who had been elected in 1980.

Incumbents who lost re-election

Change in Senate composition

Before the elections

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40
Ran
D39
Ran
D38
Ran
D37
Ran
D36
Ran
D35 D34 D33 D32 D31
D41
Ran
D42
Ran
D43
Ran
D44
Ran
D45
Ran
D46
Ran
D47
Ran
R53
Ran
R52
Ran
R51
Ran
Majority →
R41
Ran
R42
Ran
R43
Ran
R44
Ran
R45
Ran
R46
Ran
R47
Ran
R48
Ran
R49
Ran
R50
Ran
R40
Ran
R39
Ran
R38
Ran
R37
Ran
R36
Ran
R35
Ran
R34
Ran
R33
Ran
R32
Ran
R31
Ran
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
Ran
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

After the elections

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40
Re-elected
D39
Re-elected
D38
Re-elected
D37
Re-elected
D36
Re-elected
D35 D34 D33 D32 D31
D41
Re-elected
D42
Re-elected
D43
Re-elected
D44
Re-elected
D45
Hold
D46
Hold
D47
Gain
D48
Gain
D49
Gain
D50
Gain
Majority → D51
Gain
R41
Re-elected
R42
Re-elected
R43
Re-elected
R44
Hold
R45
Gain
D55
Gain
D54
Gain
D53
Gain
D52
Gain
R40
Re-elected
R39
Re-elected
R38
Re-elected
R37
Re-elected
R36
Re-elected
R35
Re-elected
R34
Re-elected
R33
Re-elected
R32
Re-elected
R31
Re-elected
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
Re-elected
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10
Key:
D# Democratic
R# Republican

Race summary

Special election during the 99th Congress

In this special election, the winner was seated during 1986.

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
North Carolina
(Class 3)
Jim Broyhill Republican 1986 (Appointed) Interim appointee lost election to finish term.
New senator elected November 4, 1986.
Democratic gain.
Winner also elected to the next term, see below.
Terry Sanford (Democratic) 50.9%
Jim Broyhill (Republican) 49.1%

Elections leading to the next Congress

In these general elections, the winners were elected for the term beginning January 3, 1987; ordered by state.

All of the elections involved the Class 3 seats.

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Alabama Jeremiah Denton Republican 1980 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Richard Shelby (Democratic) 50.9%
Jeremiah Denton (Republican) 49.1%
Alaska Frank Murkowski Republican 1980 Incumbent re-elected. Frank Murkowski (Republican) 54.0%
Glenn Olds (Democratic) 44.1%
Chuck House (Libertarian) 1.7%
Arizona Barry Goldwater Republican 1952
1958
1964 (Retired)
1968
1974
1980
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican hold.
John McCain (Republican) 60.6%
Richard Kimball (Democratic) 39.4%
Arkansas Dale Bumpers Democratic 1974
1980
Incumbent re-elected. Dale Bumpers (Democratic) 62.9%
Asa Hutchinson (Republican) 37.1%
California Alan Cranston Democratic 1968
1974
1980
Incumbent re-elected. Alan Cranston (Democratic) 49.3%
Ed Zschau (Republican) 47.8%
Breck McKinley (Libertarian) 1.5%
Edward B. Vallen (American Ind.) 0.9%
Andrew R. Kangas (Peace & Freedom) 0.5%
Colorado Gary Hart Democratic 1974
1980
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic hold.
Tim Wirth (Democratic) 49.9%
Ken Kramer (Republican) 48.4%
Michael Bush (Independent) 1.0%
Michael Chamberlain (Socialist Workers) 0.4%
Henry Olshaw (Unaffiliated American) 0.2%
Calvin Dodge (Prohibition) 0.1%
Connecticut Chris Dodd Democratic 1980 Incumbent re-elected. Chris Dodd (Democratic) 64.8%
Roger W. Eddy (Republican) 34.8%
Edward McCallum (Independent) 0.4%
Florida Paula Hawkins Republican 1980 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Bob Graham (Democratic) 55%
Paula Hawkins (Republican) 45%
Georgia Mack Mattingly Republican 1980 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Wyche Fowler (Democratic) 50.9%
Mack Mattingly (Republican) 49.1%
Hawaii Daniel Inouye Democratic 1962
1968
1974
1980
Incumbent re-elected. Daniel Inouye (Democratic) 73.6%
Frank Hutchinson (Republican) 26.4%
Idaho Steve Symms Republican 1980 Incumbent re-elected. Steve Symms (Republican) 51.4%
John V. Evans (Democratic) 48.6%
Illinois Alan J. Dixon Democratic 1980 Incumbent re-elected. Alan J. Dixon (Democratic) 65.4%
Judy Koehler (Republican) 34.1%
Indiana Dan Quayle Republican 1980 Incumbent re-elected. Dan Quayle (Republican) 61.1%
Jill L. Long (Democratic) 38.9%
Iowa Chuck Grassley Republican 1980 Incumbent re-elected. Chuck Grassley (Republican) 66.0%
John P. Roehrick (Democratic) 34.0%
Kansas Bob Dole Republican 1968
1974
1980
Incumbent re-elected. Bob Dole (Republican) 70.1%
Guy MacDonald (Democratic) 29.9%
Kentucky Wendell H. Ford Democratic 1974
1980
Incumbent re-elected. Wendell H. Ford (Democratic) 74.3%
Jackson M. Andrews (Republican) 25.7%
Louisiana Russell B. Long Democratic 1948 (Special)
1950
1956
1962
1968
1974
1980
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic hold.
John Breaux (Democratic) 52.8%
Henson Moore (Republican) 47.2%
Maryland Charles Mathias Republican 1968
1974
1980
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Barbara Mikulski (Democratic) 60.8%
Linda Chavez (Republican) 39.2%
Missouri Thomas Eagleton Democratic 1968
1974
1980
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Kit Bond (Republican) 52.6%
Harriett Woods (Democratic) 47.4%
Nevada Paul Laxalt Republican 1974
1980
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Harry Reid (Democratic) 50.0%
James David Santini (Republican) 44.5%
Kent Cromwell (Libertarian) 1.9%
New Hampshire Warren Rudman Republican 1980 Incumbent re-elected. Warren Rudman (Republican) 62.9%
Endicott Peabody (Democratic) 32.4%
Gruce Valley (Independent) 4.7%
New York Al D'Amato Republican 1980 Incumbent re-elected. Al D'Amato (Republican) 57.7%
Mark J. Green (Democratic) 40.9%
John S. Dyson (Liberal) 1.4%
Fred Newman (New Alliance) 0.3%
Michael Shur (Socialist Workers) 0.2%
North Carolina Jim Broyhill Republican 1986 (Appointed) Interim appointee lost election to the next term.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Winner was also elected to finish the current term, see above.
Terry Sanford (Democratic) 51.8%
Jim Broyhill (Republican) 48.2%
North Dakota Mark Andrews Republican 1980 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Kent Conrad (Democratic) 49.8%
Mark Andrews (Republican) 49.0%
Ohio John Glenn Democratic 1974
1974 (Appointed)
1980
Incumbent re-elected. John Glenn (Democratic) 62.4%
Tom Kindness (Republican) 37.6%
Oklahoma Don Nickles Republican 1980 Incumbent re-elected. Don Nickles (Republican) 54.5%
James R. Jones (Democratic) 45.5%
Oregon Bob Packwood Republican 1968
1974
1980
Incumbent re-elected. Bob Packwood (Republican) 63.5%
Rick Bauman (Democratic) 36.5%
Pennsylvania Arlen Specter Republican 1980 Incumbent re-elected. Arlen Specter (Republican) 56.9%
Robert W. Edgar (Democratic) 43.1%
South Carolina Ernest Hollings Democratic 1966 (Special)
1968
1974
1980
Incumbent re-elected. Ernest Hollings (Democratic) 63.9%
Henry D. McMaster (Republican) 36.1%
South Dakota James Abdnor Republican 1980 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Tom Daschle (Democratic) 51.6%
James Abdnor (Republican) 48.4%
Utah Jake Garn Republican 1974
1980
Incumbent re-elected. Jake Garn (Republican) 72.3%
Craig Oliver (Democratic) 26.6%
Hugh A. Butler (Libertarian) 0.7%
Mary Zins (Independent) 0.4%
Vermont Patrick Leahy Democratic 1974
1980
Incumbent re-elected. Patrick Leahy (Democratic) 63.7%
Richard A. Snelling (Republican) 34.7%
Washington Slade Gorton Republican 1980 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Brock Adams (Democratic) 50.6%
Slade Gorton (Republican) 48.7%
Jill Fein (Socialist Workers) 0.7%
Wisconsin Bob Kasten Republican 1980 Incumbent re-elected. Bob Kasten (Republican) 51.8%
Ed Garvey (Democratic) 48.2%

Special elections during the 100th Congress

There were no special elections in 1987 after January 3.

Alabama

Alabama election
Alabama
← 1980
1992 →
  Richard Shelby 97th Congress 1981.jpg JeremiahDentonSenate.jpg
Nominee Richard Shelby Jeremiah Denton
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 609,360 602,537
Percentage 50.3% 49.7%

U.S. Senator before election

Jeremiah Denton
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Richard Shelby
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Jeremiah Denton ran for a second term but lost to Democrat Richard Shelby.

Shelby, a moderate-to-conservative Democrat avoided a primary runoff and won nomination in the Democratic Party primary.[1]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Richard Shelby 420,155 51.33%
Democratic Jim Allen, Jr. 284,206 34.72%
Democratic Ted McLaughlin 70,784 8.65%
Democratic Margaret Stewart 26,723 3.27%
Democratic Steve Arnold 16,722 2.04%
Total votes 818,590 100.00%

Incumbent Senator Jeremiah Denton, a retired Rear Admiral and decorated Vietnam War veteran who six years earlier became the first Republican elected to the Senate from Alabama since Reconstruction, won the Republican primary with little opposition.[2]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jeremiah Denton 29,805 88.55%
Republican Richard Vickers 3,854 11.45%
Total votes 33,659 100.00%

Shelby won a very narrow victory over Denton (less than one percent).[3]

  • Shelby - 609,360 (50.28%)
  • Denton - 602,537 (49.72%)

Alaska

Alaska election
Alaska
← 1980
1992 →
  Frankmurkowski.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Frank Murkowski Glenn Olds
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 97,764 79,727
Percentage 54.02% 44.10%

U.S. Senator before election

Frank Murkowski
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Frank Murkowski
Republican

Incumbent Republican Frank Murkowski ran for a second term and was primarily opposed by Alaska Pacific University President Glenn Olds and Libertarian Chuck House, field representative for Eastman Kodak Company. Following a highly competitive election in 1980, Murkowski faced a legitimate opponent in Glenn Olds, and the contest was fairly close. However, in the end, Murkowski was able to defeat Olds by a slightly wider margin than he won by six years prior.

Open primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Frank Murkowski (inc.) 91,705 63.11%
Democratic Glenn Olds 36,995 25.46%
Democratic Bill Barnes 4,871 3.35%
Libertarian Chuck House 4,265 2.94%
Democratic Dave J. Carlson 4,211 2.90%
Democratic Michael J. Bruner 1,809 1.24%
Democratic Karl Francis 1,454 1.00%
Total votes 145,310 100.00%
United States Senate election in Alaska, 1986[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Frank Murkowski (Incumbent) 97,674 54.02% +0.34%
Democratic Glenn Olds 79,727 44.10% -1.84%
Libertarian Chuck House 3,161 1.75%
Write-ins 239 0.13%
Majority 17,947 9.93% +2.17%
Turnout 180,801
Republican hold Swing

Arizona

Arizona election
Arizona
← 1980
1992 →
  John McCain Official Other Version.jpg Noimage.png
Nominee John McCain Richard Kimball
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 521,850 340,965
Percentage 60.4% 39.5%

1986 Arizona.png
U.S. Senate election results map.
Red denotes counties won by McCain.
Blue denotes those won by Kimball.

U.S. Senator before election

Barry Goldwater
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

John McCain
Republican

Incumbent Republican Barry Goldwater decided to retire instead of seeking a sixth term. The open seat was won by Republican John McCain, a Congressman and former Navy Officer who beat Democratic State Legislator Richard Kimball.

Kimball's campaign was subject to negative press from the Arizona Republic and Phoenix Gazette, both owned by McCain benefactor Darrow Tully. One Gazette columnist described him as displaying "terminal weirdness."[6] McCain ultimately won the election by a margin of 20%.[5]</ref>.

General election results[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican John McCain 521,850 60.47% +11.02%
Democratic Richard Kimball 340,965 39.51% -8.87%
Write-ins 106 0.01%
Majority 180,885 20.96% +19.89%
Turnout 862,921
Republican hold Swing

Arkansas

Arkansas election
Arkansas
← 1980
1992 →
  Dale Bumpers.jpg AsaHutchinson.jpg
Nominee Dale Bumpers Asa Hutchinson
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 433,122 262,313
Percentage 62.3% 37.7%

U.S. Senator before election

Dale Bumpers
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Dale Bumpers
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Dale Bumpers won re-election to a third term over Republican U.S. Attorney Asa Hutchinson.

Arkansas Senate election 1986[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dale Bumpers (Incumbent) 433,122 62.3%
Republican Asa Hutchinson 262,313 37.7%
Independent Ralph Forbes 52 0.1%

California

California election
California
← 1980
1992 →
  AlanCranston.jpg Rep. Ed Zschau.jpg
Nominee Alan Cranston Ed Zschau
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 3,646,672 3,541,804
Percentage 49.3% 47.9%

U.S. Senator before election

Alan Cranston
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Alan Cranston
Democratic

Incumbent Democratic Alan Cranston narrowly won re-election to a fourth term over Republican Ed Zschau, U.S. Congressman from the 12th district.

1986 United States Senate election, California[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Alan Cranston (Incumbent) 3,646,672 49.3%
Republican Ed Zschau 3,541,804 47.9%
American Independent Edward B Vallen 109,916 1.5%
Libertarian Breck McKinley 66,261 0.9%
Peace and Freedom Paul Kangas 33,869 0.5%

Colorado

Colorado election
Colorado
← 1980
1992 →
  Tim Wirth.jpg Kenneth B. Kramer.jpg
Nominee Tim Wirth Ken Kramer
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 529,449 512,994
Percentage 49.9% 48.4%

U.S. Senator before election

Gary Hart
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Tim Wirth
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Gary Hart retired instead of seeking a third term. Democratic nominee Tim Wirth won the open seat over Republican U.S. Representative Ken Kramer.

General election results[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Tim Wirth 529,449 49.91% -0.42%
Republican Ken Kramer 512,994 48.36% -0.34%
Independent Michael Martin Bush 11,127 1.05%
Socialist Workers Michael R. Chamberlain 3,756 0.35%
Independent American Henry John Olshaw 1,868 0.18% -0.17%
Prohibition Calvin G. Dodge 1,571 0.15%
Majority 16,455 1.55% -0.09%
Turnout 1,060,765
Democratic hold Swing

Connecticut

Connecticut election
Connecticut
← 1980
1992 →
  Sen Dodd speaks at a Navy ceremony at New London, Conn, July 6, 1985.JPEG No image.svg
Nominee Chris Dodd Roger Eddy
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 632,695 340,438
Percentage 64.8% 34.9%

Connecticut Election Results by County, all Democratic.svg
County Results

U.S. Senator before election

Chris Dodd
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Chris Dodd
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Chris Dodd won re-election to a second term over Republican Roger Eddy of the Republican National Committee[9]

Connecticut United States Senate election, 1986[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Christ Dodd (Incumbent) 632,695 64.8%
Republican Roger Eddy 340,438 34.9%
Independent Edward J. McCallum, Jr. 3,800 0.4%

Florida

Florida election
Florida
← 1980
1992 →
  Bob Graham, official Senate photo portrait, color.jpg Hawkins, Paula.jpg
Nominee Bob Graham Paula Hawkins
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,877,543 1,552,376
Percentage 54.7% 45.2%

U.S. Senator before election

Paula Hawkins
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Bob Graham
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Paula Hawkins decided to run for re-election to second term, but lost to popular Governor of Florida Bob Graham.[5]

Democratic primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bob Graham 850,560 85.04%
Democratic Bob Kunst 149,657 14.96%
Total votes 1,000,217 100.00%
Republican primary results[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paula Hawkins (Incumbent) 491,767 88.73%
Republican Jon Larsen Shudlick 62,443 11.27%
Total votes 554,210 100.00%
General election results[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Bob Graham 1,877,543 54.74% +6.40%
Republican Paula Hawkins (Incumbent) 1,552,376 45.26% -6.40%
Write-ins 77 0.00%
Majority 325,167 9.48% +6.16%
Turnout 3,429,996
Democratic gain from Republican Swing

Georgia

Georgia election
Georgia (U.S. state)
← 1980
1992 →
  Wyche Fowler.PNG MackMattingly.jpg
Nominee Wyche Fowler Mack Mattingly
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 623,707 601,241
Percentage 50.92% 49.08%

86GASenateCounties.PNG
County Results

U.S. Senator before election

Mack Mattingly
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Wyche Fowler
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Mack Mattingly decided to run for re-election and lost a close race to Democratic U.S. Congressman Wyche Fowler.[5]

1986 United States Senate election, Georgia[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Wyche Fowler 623,707 50.91% +1.78%
Republican Mack Mattingly (Incumbent) 601,241 49.08% -1.79%
Write-In Votes 60 0.00% N/A
Majority 22,466 1.83% +.09%
Turnout 1,225,008
Democratic gain from Republican Swing 1.78%

Hawaii

Idaho

Idaho election
Idaho
← 1980
1992 →
  Stevesymms.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Steve Symms John V. Evans
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 196,958 185,066
Percentage 51.6% 48.4%

U.S. Senator before election

Steve Symms
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Steve Symms
Republican

Incumbent Republican Steve Symms won re-election to a second term over Democratic Governor John V. Evans.

General election results[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Steve Symms (Incumbent) 196,958 51.56% +1.81%
Democratic John V. Evans 185,066 48.44% -0.33%
Majority 11,892 3.11% +2.14%
Turnout 382,024
Republican hold Swing

Illinois

Illinois election
Illinois
← 1980
1992 →
  Alan John Dixon.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Alan Dixon Judy Koehler
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 2,033,783 1,053,734
Percentage 65.1% 33.7%

United States Senate election in Illinois, 1986 map.png
County Results

U.S. Senator before election

Alan J. Dixon
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Alan J. Dixon
Democratic

The incumbent Democratic Alan J. Dixon won re-election to a second term over Republican State Representative Judy Koehler. This is also the last time as of 2016 that a winning Senate Candidate was elected to this seat twice.

Dixon easily won the senate race. Koehler fared poorly throughout most parts of the state, only winning 10 of the states 102 counties.

Illinois United States Senate election, 1986[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Alan J. Dixon (Incumbent) 2,033,783 65.1% +9.1%
Republican Judy Koehler 1,053,734 33.7% -8.8%
Independent Einar V. Dyhrkopp 15,804 0.5%
Libertarian Donald M. Parrish, Jr. 13,891 0.5%
Socialist Workers Omari Musa 5,671 0.2%

Indiana

Indiana election
Indiana
← 1980
1990 →
  44 Dan Quayle 3x4.jpg Jill Long.jpg
Nominee Dan Quayle Jill Long Thompson
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 936,143 595,192
Percentage 60.6% 38.5%

U.S. Senator before election

Dan Quayle
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Dan Quayle
Republican

Incumbent Republican Dan Quayle won re-election to a second term over Democratic Valparaiso City Councilwoman Jill L. Long.[15]

General election results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Quayle (Incumbent) 936,143 60.57%
Democratic Jill L. Long 595,192 38.51%
Libertarian Bradford Warren 8,314 0.54%
American Rockland Snyder 5,914 0.38%
Majority 340,951 22.06%
Voter turnout  %

Iowa

Iowa election
Iowa
← 1980
1992 →
  Chuck Grassley.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Chuck Grassley John P. Roehrick
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 588,880 299,406
Percentage 66.04% 33.57%

U.S. Senator before election

Chuck Grassley
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Chuck Grassley
Republican

Incumbent Republican Chuck Grassley ran for re-election to a second term, which he won easily over Democratic nominee John P. Roehrick, an attorney.

Democratic primary results[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John P. Roehrick 88,347 83.83%
Democratic Juan Cortez 16,987 16.12%
Democratic Write-ins 60 0.06%
Total votes 105,394 100.00%
Republican primary results[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chuck Grassley (Incumbent) 108,370 99.96%
Republican Write-ins 38 0.04%
Total votes 108,408 100.00%
United States Senate election in Iowa, 1986[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Chuck Grassley (Incumbent) 588,880 66.04% +12.55%
Democratic John P. Roehrick 299,406 33.57% -11.97%
Independent John Masters 3,370 0.38%
Write-ins 106 0.01%
Majority 289,474 32.46% +24.51%
Turnout 891,762
Republican hold Swing

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maryland

Maryland election
Maryland
← 1980
1992 →
  Barbara Mikulski.jpg Linda Chavez by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Nominee Barbara Mikulski Linda Chavez
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 675,225 437,411
Percentage 60.7% 39.3%

U.S. Senator before election

Charles Mathias, Jr.
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Barbara Mikulski
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Charles Mathias, Jr. decided to retire, instead of seeking a fourth term. Democratic Congresswoman Barbara Mikulski defeated Republican Reagan Administration official Linda Chavez for the open seat.

Democratic primary results[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barbara A. Mikulski 307,876 49.50%
Democratic Michael D. Barnes 195,086 31.37%
Democratic Harry Hughes 88,908 14.30%
Democratic Debra Hanania Freeman 9,350 1.50%
Democratic Edward M. Olszewski 7,877 1.27%
Democratic A. Robert Kaufman 6,505 1.05%
Democratic Boyd E. Sweatt 3,580 0.58%
Democratic Leonard E. Trout, Jr. 2,742 0.44%
Total votes 621,924 100.00%
Republican primary results[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Linda Chavez 100,888 73.07%
Republican Michael Schaefer 16,902 12.24%
Republican George Haley 5,808 4.21%
Republican Melvin Perkins 2,785 2.02%
Republican Nicholas T. Nonnenmacher 2,751 1.99%
Republican Richard Sullivan 2,328 1.69%
Republican Howard D. Greyber 1,678 1.22%
Republican Monroe Cornish 1,497 1.08%
Republican Herbert Stone Rosenberg 1,337 0.97%
Republican Horace Stuart Rich 1,199 0.87%
Republican Abraham H. Kalish 901 0.65%
Total votes 138,074 100.00%

Mathias announced his retirement from politics. At the time of this announcement, it was expected that then-Governor Harry Hughes would run for the seat being vacated by retiring Senator Mathias. However, Hughes became caught up in the aftermath of the Maryland savings and loan crisis. He lost popularity with voters, opening the door for Mikulski's bid for the Senate.

Chavez won the primary handily, defeating several Republican challengers. Later, she made comments that some Mikulski supporters interpreted as an attempt to draw attention to the issue of Mikulski's sexual orientation. In an article quoting Chavez's claim that Mikulski was a "San Francisco-style, George McGovern, liberal Democrat", the Washington Post reported that Chavez was directly implying that the never-married Mikulski was a lesbian.[citation needed] Chavez was accused of making Mikulski's sexual orientation a central issue of the political campaign. In defending her use of the phrase, Chavez stated the line "San Francisco Democrats" was a reference to Jeane Kirkpatrick's 1984 Republican National Convention "Blame America First" speech, in which Kirkpatrick coined the phrase "San Francisco Liberal."[citation needed]. The phrase "San Francisco liberal" was common at the time.

Mikulski never directly responded to the issue and eventually won the race with 61 percent of the vote.[citation needed] She was the first female Democrat elected to the U.S. Senate in her own right (not appointed or filling a seat of a deceased husband).

United States Senate election in Maryland, 1986[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Barbara A. Mikulski 675,225 60.69% +26.85%
Republican Linda Chavez 437,411 39.31% -26.85%
Majority 237,814 21.37% -10.96%
Total votes 1,017,151 100.00%
Democratic gain from Republican Swing

Missouri

Missouri election
Missouri
← 1980
1992 →
  Kit Bond official portrait cropped.jpg Harriett Woods.jpg
Nominee Kit Bond Harriett Woods
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 777,612 699,624
Percentage 52.6% 44.9%

U.S. Senator before election

Thomas Eagleton
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Kit Bond
Republican

Incumbent Democrat Tom Eagleton decided to retire instead of seeking a fourth term. Republican Governor Kit Bond won the open seat, beating Democratic Lieutenant Governor Harriett Woods.

General election results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kit Bond 777,612 52.6%
Democratic Harriett Woods 699,624 47.4%

Nevada

Nevada election
Nevada
← 1980
1992 →
  Harry Reid official portrait.jpg James David Santini.jpg
Nominee Harry Reid Jim Santini
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 130,955 116,606
Percentage 50.0% 44.5%

U.S. Senator before election

Paul Laxalt
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Harry Reid
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Paul Laxalt decided to retire instead of seeking a third term. U.S. Representative Democratic nominee Harry Reid won the open seat over Republican former U.S. Representative James David Santini.[5]

General election results[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Harry Reid 130,955 50.00% +12.61%
Republican Jim Santini 116,606 44.52% -14.01%
None of These Candidates 9,472 3.62% +2.33%
Libertarian Kent Cromwell 4,899 1.87% -0.94%
Majority 14,349 5.48% -15.66%
Turnout 261,932
Democratic gain from Republican Swing

New Hampshire

New Hampshire election
New Hampshire
← 1980
1992 →
  Warren Rudman.jpg Endicott Peabody Gov.jpg
Nominee Warren Rudman Endicott Peabody
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 154,090 79,222
Percentage 63.0% 32.4%

U.S. Senator before election

Warren Rudman
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Warren Rudman
Republican

Incumbent Republican Warren Rudman won re-election to a second term, beating the Democratic former Governor of Massachusetts Endicott Peabody.

General election results[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Warren Rudman (Incumbent) 154,090 63.0%
Democratic Endicott Peabody 79,222 32.4%
Independent Bruce Valley 11,423 4.7%

New York

New York election
New York (state)
← 1980
1992 →
  Alfonse D'Amato.jpg Mark Green 2 by David Shankbone.jpg
Nominee Al D'Amato Mark Green
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 2,378,197 1,723,216
Percentage 56.9% 41.2%

NewYorkSenatorial1986.svg
County Results

U.S. Senator before election

Al D'Amato
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Al D'Amato
Republican

Incumbent Republican Al D'Amato won re-election to a second term over Democrat Mark Green, the Chief Speechwriter for U.S. Senator Gary Hart and former congressional candidate.

1986 New York U.S. Senate general election[19][5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Al D'Amato (Incumbent) 2,030,260 '
Conservative (N.Y.) Al D'Amato 212,101
Right to Life (N.Y.) Al D'Amato 135,386
total Al D'Amato 2,378,197 56.9%
Democratic Mark Green 1,723,216 41.2%
Liberal (N.Y.) John S. Dyson 60,099 1.4%
New Alliance Fred Newman 10,559 0.3%
Socialist Workers Michael Shur 7,376 0.2%
Others 305,412

North Carolina

North Carolina election
North Carolina
← 1980
1992 →
  Terry Sanford.jpg James Broyhill.jpg
Nominee Terry Sanford Jim Broyhill
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 823,662 767,668
Percentage 51.76% 49.38%

U.S. Senator before election

Jim Broyhill
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Terry Sanford
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Jim Broyhill, who had been appointed in June 1986 to serve out the rest of John Porter East's term, faced off against the popular Democratic former Governor Terry Sanford. There were two separate elections held on the same day: a special election for what little remained of the 99th United States Congress (November 1986-January 1987) and a regular election for a new six-year term (beginning in January 1987).[20] Sanford won both elections.

The primary elections would nominate candidates to the special and the regular election.

Terry Sanford, then the outgoing president of Duke University, first said in September 1985 that he was planning to run for the U.S. Senate the next year but quickly withdrew, as it appeared that the party wanted a "fresh" face, most likely in the person of UNC System President William Friday.[21] Then, Friday declined to run, as did other well-known politicians like former Gov. Jim Hunt.[22] Former North Carolina Secretary of Commerce Lauch Faircloth then made it known that he would run, but he was considered too conservative by many party leaders, who encouraged Sanford to enter the race in order to defeat Faircloth.[21] Sanford agreed to run, which led Faircloth and another candidate, Judge Marvin K. Blount Jr., to withdraw before filing their candidacies. Six years later, Faircloth did run for the Senate against Sanford, but this time as a Republican.

Sen. East declined to run for a second term, citing his health. Longtime U.S. Representative Jim Broyhill entered the race with much of the establishment support, but David Funderburk had the backing of the organization of Senator Jesse Helms.[22] Funderburk charged Broyhill with being insufficiently conservative, but in the end, Broyhill won the nomination handily in the May primary. The next month, Sen. East committed suicide, and Gov. James G. Martin appointed Broyhill to his seat.

1986 North Carolina U.S. Senate Democratic primary election[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Terry Sanford 409,394 60.25%
Democratic John Ingram 111,557 16.42%
Democratic Fountain Odom 49,689 7.31%
Democratic William Belk 33,821 4.98%
Democratic Theodore Kinney 27,228 4.01%
Democratic Betty Wallace 17,001 2.50%
Democratic Katherine Harper 12,998 1.91%
Democratic Walt Atkins 8,306 1.22%
Democratic Others 9,493 1.40%
Voter turnout  %
1986 North Carolina U.S. Senate Republican primary election[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim Broyhill 139,570 66.52%
Republican David Funderburk 63,593 30.31%
Republican Glenn Miller 6,662 3.18%
Voter turnout  %
1986 North Carolina U.S. Senate election[25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Terry Sanford 823,662 51.76% +2.38%
Republican Jim Broyhill (Incumbent) 767,668 48.24% -1.72%
Turnout 1,591,330

North Carolina (Special)

North Carolina special election
North Carolina
← 1980
1992 →
  Terry Sanford.jpg James Broyhill.jpg
Nominee Terry Sanford Jim Broyhill
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 780,967 753,881
Percentage 50.88% 49.12%

U.S. Senator before election

Jim Broyhill
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Terry Sanford
Democratic

This was a special election for what little remained of the 99th United States Congress (November 1986-January 1987), being held contemporaneously with a regular election for a new six-year term (beginning in January 1987).[20] Sanford won both elections.

The primary elections would nominate candidates to the special and the regular election.

For background and primary election results, see the above section or United States Senate election in North Carolina, 1986.

1986 North Carolina U.S. Senate election – Special election[26]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Terry Sanford 780,967 50.88%
Republican Jim Broyhill (Incumbent) 753,881 49.12%
Voter turnout  %

North Dakota

North Dakota election
North Dakota
← 1980
1992 →
  Kent Conrad official portrait.jpg Mark Andrews, US Senator from North Dakota.jpg
Nominee Kent Conrad Mark Andrews
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 143,932 141,812
Percentage 49.8% 49.1%

86NDSenateCounties.PNG
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Mark Andrews
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Kent Conrad
Democratic

Incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Mark Andrews lost re-election to a second term to Dem-NPL nominee Kent Conrad, State Tax Commissioner. Andrews lost re-election by just over 2,000[5] votes after a rigorous campaign involving personal attacks and other strategies[citation needed].

General election results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kent Conrad 143,932 49.80%
Republican Mark Andrews (Incumbent) 141,812 49.07%
Independent Anna B. Bourgois 3,269 1.13%
Majority
Democratic gain from Republican
Voter turnout  %

Ohio

Ohio election
Ohio
← 1980
1992 →
  John Glenn Low Res.jpg Tom Kindness 97th Congress 1981.jpg
Nominee John Glenn Tom Kindness
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,949,208 1,171,893
Percentage 62.5% 37.6%

U.S. Senator before election

John Glenn
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

John Glenn
Democratic

Incumbent Democratic U.S Senator John Glenn won re-election to a third term over Republican U.S. Congressman Tom Kindness.

OhioUnited States Senate election, 1986[27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Glenn (Incumbent) 1,949,208 62.5%
Republican Tom Kindness 1,171,893 37.6%
Independent Kathleen M. Button 59 0.0%
Independent William M. Harris 29 0.0%

Oklahoma

Oklahoma election
Oklahoma
← 1980
1992 →
  Don Nickles.jpg James Robert Jones.jpg
Nominee Don Nickles James R. Jones
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 493,436 400,230
Percentage 55.2% 44.8%

U.S. Senator before election

Don Nickles
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Don Nickles
Republican

Incumbent Republican Don Nickles won re-election to his second term, over Democratic U.S. Congressman James R. Jones.

OK U.S. Senate election, 1986[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Don Nickles (Incumbent) 493,436 55.2%
Democratic James R. Jones 400,230 44.8%

Oregon

Oregon election
Oregon
← 1980
1992 →
  RWPackwood.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Bob Packwood Rick Bauman
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 656,317 375,735
Percentage 63.5% 36.5%

U.S. Senator before election

Bob Packwood
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Bob Packwood
Republican

Incumbent Bob Packwood ran for re-election. U.S. Congressman Jim Weaver received the Democratic nomination. A populist Democratic congressman from Eugene, Oregon, he was a darling of the environmentalists. Weaver supported the Oregon Wilderness Act of 1984. Packwood was confident despite the popular opponent, because had more money and a better campaign organization.[29] After winning the party nomination, Weaver was the subject of a House Ethics Committee probe into his campaign finances, and withdrew his candidacy. Rick Bauman was selected to replace Weaver on the ballot, and lost handily to Packwood.

Democratic primary for the United States Senate from Oregon, 1986[30]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Weaver 183,334 61.56%
Democratic Rod Monroe 44,553 14.96%
Democratic Rick Bauman 41,939 14.08%
Democratic Steve Anderson 26,130 8.77%
Democratic miscellaneous 1,868 0.63%
Total votes 297,824 100.00%
Republican primary for the United States Senate from Oregon, 1986[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bob Packwood 171,985 57.62%
Republican Joe Lutz 126,315 42.32%
Republican miscellaneous 166 0.06%
Total votes 298,466 100.00%
United States Senate election in Oregon, 1986[32]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bob Packwood 656,317 62.95%
Democratic Rick Bauman 375,735 36.04%
Independent (United States) Write-in 10,503 1.01%
Total votes 1,042,555 100.00%
Republican hold

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania election
Pennsylvania
← 1980
1992 →
  Arlen Specter 1960.jpg Robert W. Edgar.jpg
Nominee Arlen Specter Bob Edgar
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 1,906,537 1,448,219
Percentage 56.4% 42.9%

Pennsylvania Senatorial Election Results by County, 1986.svg
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Arlen Specter
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Arlen Specter
Republican

Incumbent Republican Arlen Specter won re-election to a second term over Democratic U.S. Congressman Bob Edgar. Despite the popularity of his Republican counterpart John Heinz, Arlen Specter was viewed somewhat tepidly by the Pennsylvania electorate entering the race, although both men shared similar moderate profiles. Additionally, economic woes had dragged down the popularity of Republican candidates in the industrial states. Democrats sensed the vulnerability of the incumbent, and two men with similar experience in the U.S. House, but contrasting political views, vied for the nomination. Don Bailey, the state's incumbent Auditor General, was viewed[by whom?] as the initial favorite, as he projected a strong blue collar image and had moderate positions that were often relatively close to Specter's. Bob Edgar, a Methodist minister and sitting Congressman, had more liberal viewpoints, as he was connected with the Vietnam War-era peace movement and the anti-corruption movement following the Watergate scandals. However, issues played a very minor role in the primary, which instead showcased the state's geographical divide, with Delaware County-based Edgar narrowly defeating Westmoreland County-based Bailey.[33]

True to his past as a political organizer, Edgar developed a strong grassroots campaign and reached out to alienated left-leaning voters. He attacked Specter as a politician who compromised his moderate political positions when pressured by the conservative administration of Ronald Reagan. Edgar, who had a history of winning tight races in his congressional district, was a financial underdog, as Specter was able to raise nearly three times as much for his campaign warchest. Originally attempting a positive campaign, Specter changed his strategy in response to Edgar's personal attacks and characterized Edgar as soft on defense issues and as a liberal ideologue. Edgar was never able to find a message that resonated with voters in the western portion of the state, and Specter undercut Edgar's support in both candidates' suburban Philadelphia home by presenting himself as representative of the views of the average suburban voter.[33]

General election results[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Arlen Specter 1,906,537 56.4%
Democratic Robert W. Edgar 1,448,219 42.9%
Independent Lance S. Haver 23,470 0.7%

South Carolina

South Carolina election
South Carolina
← 1980
1992 →
  FritzHollings.jpg Henry McMaster official photo.jpg
Nominee Ernest Hollings Henry McMaster
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 463,354 261,394
Percentage 63.10% 35.60%

U.S. Senator before election

Ernest Hollings
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Ernest Hollings
Democratic

Popular incumbent Democratic Senator Fritz Hollings easily defeated Republican U.S. Attorney Henry McMaster to win his fourth full term.

Republican Primary
Candidate Votes %
Henry McMaster 27,695 53.4%
Henry Jordan 24,164 46.6%

The race was not seriously contested and was not a target by the Republicans. With little financial assistance, McMaster was unable to mount a credible challenge to Hollings' re-election in what became a difficult year for Republicans.

South Carolina U.S. Senate Election, 1986
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Fritz Hollings 465,511 63.1% -7.3%
Republican Henry McMaster 262,976 35.6% +6.0%
Libertarian Steven B. Vandervelde 4,788 0.7% +0.7%
American Ray Hillyard 4,588 0.6% +0.6%
No party Write-Ins 199 0.0% 0.0%
Majority 202,535 27.5% -13.3%
Turnout 738,062 56.6% -13.9%
Democratic hold

South Dakota

South Dakota election
South Dakota
← 1980
1992 →
  Tom Daschle, official Senate photo.jpg JamesAbdnor.jpg
Nominee Tom Daschle James Abdnor
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 152,657 143,173
Percentage 51.6% 48.4%

86SDSenateCounties.PNG
County results

U.S. Senator before election

James Abdnor
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Tom Daschle
Democratic

Incumbent Republican James Abdnor ran for re-election to a second term, but was defeated by Democratic Congressman Tom Daschle.[34]

Despite Abdnor winning the primary by a fairly comfortable margin, it hurt him badly. Daschle was uncontested for the Democratic nomination and therefore was able to focus on the general election early, while Abdnor had to fight a challenge from an incumbent governor. Many political analysts say this was one of the factors in Abdnor's general election loss.

Republican primary results[35]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican James Abdnor (Incumbent) 63,414 54.51%
Republican Bill Janklow 52,924 45.49%
Total votes 116,338 100.00%
General election results[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Tom Daschle 152,657 51.60% +12.21%
Republican James Abdnor (Incumbent) 143,173 48.40% -9.80%
Majority 9,484 3.21% -15.60%
Turnout 295,830
Democratic gain from Republican Swing

Utah

Vermont

Vermont election
Vermont
← 1980
1992 →
  Patrick Leahy 1979 congressional photo.jpg Richard A Snelling.jpg
Nominee Patrick Leahy Richard A. Snelling
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 124,123 67,798
Percentage 63.2% 34.5%

U.S. Senator before election

Patrick Leahy
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Patrick Leahy
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Patrick Leahy won re-election to a third term over Republican former Governor of Vermont Richard A. Snelling and Liberty Unionist sociologist and perennial candidate Jerry Levy.

Democratic primary results[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patrick Leahy (inc.) 21,255 97.63%
Democratic Write-ins 516 2.37%
Total votes 21,771 100.00%
Liberty Union primary results[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Liberty Union Jerry Levy 147 93.04%
Liberty Union Write-ins 11 6.96%
Total votes 158 100.00%
Republican primary results[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Richard A. Snelling 21,477 75.11%
Republican Anthony N. Doria 6,493 22.71%
Republican Write-ins 625 2.19%
Total votes 28,595 100.00%
General election results[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Patrick Leahy (Incumbent) 124,123 63.16% +13.34%
Republican Richard A. Snelling 67,798 34.50% -14.00%
Conservative Party (United States) Anthony N. Doria 2,963 1.51%
Liberty Union Jerry Levy 1,583 0.81%
Write-ins 65 0.02%
Majority 56,325 28.66% +27.34%
Turnout 196,532
Democratic hold Swing

Washington

Washington election
Washington (state)
← 1980
1992 →
  Brock Adams.jpg Slade Gorton, official Senate photo portrait.jpg
Nominee Brock Adams Slade Gorton
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 677,471 650,931
Percentage 50.7% 48.7%

1986 Washington senate election.png
County Results

U.S. Senator before election

Slade Gorton
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Brock Adams
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Slade Gorton lost re-election to U.S. Congressman Brock Adams, former U.S. Secretary of Transportation.

United States Senate election in Washington, 1986[37]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic (Wash.) Brock Adams 677,471 50.66%
Republican (Wash.) Slade Gorton (Incumbent) 650,931 48.67%
Socialist Workers Jill Fein 8,965 0.67%

Wisconsin

Wisconsin election
Wisconsin
← 1980
1992 →
  SenatorKasten.jpg Ed Garvey 2.jpg
Nominee Bob Kasten Ed Garvey
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 754,573 702,963
Percentage 50.9% 47.4%

U.S. Senator before election

Bob Kasten
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Bob Kasten
Republican

Incumbent Republican Bob Kasten won re-election to a second term over Democratic former Deputy Attorney General of Wisconsin Ed Garvey.

General election results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bob Kasten (Incumbent) 754,573 50.9%
Democratic Ed Garvey 702,963 47.4%

See also

References

  1. ^ Our Campaigns - AL Senate - D Primary Race - Jun 06, 1986
  2. ^ Our Campaigns - AL Senate - R Primary Race - Jun 06, 1986
  3. ^ Our Campaigns - AL US Senate Race - Nov 08, 1986
  4. ^ http://www.elections.alaska.gov/results/86PRIM/86prim.pdf
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives (1987). "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 1986" (PDF). U.S. Government Printing Office. 
  6. ^ Nowicki, D. & Muller, B. (March 1, 2007). The Senate calls. The Arizona Republic. Retrieved September 16, 2007.
  7. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=3414
  8. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=3657
  9. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=ErkLAAAAIBAJ&sjid=01UDAAAAIBAJ&pg=6388,5149614&dq=chris+dodd&hl=en
  10. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=3686
  11. ^ https://doe.dos.state.fl.us/elections/resultsarchive/Index.asp?ElectionDate=9/2/1986&DATAMODE=
  12. ^ https://doe.dos.state.fl.us/elections/resultsarchive/Index.asp?ElectionDate=9/2/1986&DATAMODE=
  13. ^ "United States Senator". Our Campaigns. December 21, 2005. Retrieved January 1, 2009. 
  14. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=3673
  15. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=3770
  16. ^ a b http://sos.iowa.gov/elections/pdf/results/80s/1986primcanv.pdf
  17. ^ a b "Maryland State Board of Elections". Elections.state.md.us. August 17, 2001. Retrieved May 18, 2012. 
  18. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=3688
  19. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=3685
  20. ^ a b Advisory Opinion of the Federal Election Commission
  21. ^ a b D.G. Martin
  22. ^ a b New York Times
  23. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=132134
  24. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=78951
  25. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=3679
  26. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=78950
  27. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=3675
  28. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=144
  29. ^ http://www.andykerr.net/ConservPolitics/PackwoodNoSex.html
  30. ^ "Oregon US Senate Democratic Primary Race, May 20, 1986". ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved April 9, 2010. 
  31. ^ "Oregon US Senate Republican Primary Race, May 20, 1986". ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved April 9, 2010. 
  32. ^ "Oregon US Senate Race, Nov 4, 1986". ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved April 9, 2010. 
  33. ^ a b Kennedy, John J. (2006). Pennsylvania Elections: Statewide Contests from 1950-2004. United Press of America. pp. 65–67. ISBN 9780761832799. 
  34. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=118
  35. ^ http://www.sdsos.gov/electionsvoteregistration/electvoterpdfs/72-86/86SDPRIM.pdf
  36. ^ a b c http://vermont-elections.org/elections1/1986PrimaryCanvass.pdf
  37. ^ http://www.sos.wa.gov/elections/results_report.aspx?e=27&c=&c2=&t=&t2=&p=&p2=&y=

External links

  • State Election Commission (1987). South Carolina Election Commission Annual Report 1986-1987. Columbia, SC. pp. 14, 22. 
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