United States Senate elections, 1976

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
United States Senate elections, 1976
United States
← 1974 / 1975 November 2, 1976 1978 →

33 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate
51 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
  Robert C. Byrd – 1977.jpg Howard baker jr.jpg
Leader Robert Byrd Howard Baker
Party Democratic Republican
Leader's seat West Virginia Tennessee
Seats before 61 37
Seats after 61 38
Seat change Steady Increase 1
Popular vote 31,790,526 24,562,431
Percentage 53.7% 41.5%
Swing Decrease 1.5% Increase 1.9%
Seats up 21 10
Races won 21 11

  Third party Fourth party
 
Party Independent Conservative (N.Y.)
Seats before 1 1
Seats after 1[1] 0
Seat change Steady Decrease 1
Popular vote 890,778 311,494
Seats up 1 1
Races won 1 0

1976 Senate election map.svg
Results, with special elections
     Democratic gain      Democratic hold
     Republican gain      Republican hold
     Independent hold

Majority Leader before election

Mike Mansfield
Democratic

Elected Majority Leader

Robert Byrd
Democratic

The United States Senate elections, 1976 was an election for the United States Senate that coincided with Democratic Jimmy Carter's presidential election and the United States Bicentennial celebration. Although almost half of the seats decided in this election changed parties, Carter's narrow victory did not provide coattails for the Democrats, and the balance of the chamber remained the same.

This was the first election in which the Libertarian Party competed, running candidates in 9 of the 33 contested seats. There were no special elections in this election cycle.

Retirements

The leaders of both parties retired. Democrats had a net gain of one seat from retirements.

Democratic holds

  1. Michigan: Philip Hart (D) retired and was replaced by Donald W. Riegle, Jr. (D).
    • Hart then died December 27, 1976 and Riegle was appointed to finish the term.
  2. Montana: Majority leader Mike Mansfield (D) retired and was replaced by John Melcher (D).

Democratic gains

  1. Arizona: Paul Fannin (R) retired and was replaced by Dennis DeConcini (D).
  2. Hawaii: Hiram Fong (R) retired and was replaced by Spark Matsunaga (D).
  3. Nebraska: Roman Hruska (R) retired and was replaced by Edward Zorinsky (D).
    • Hruska then resigned December 27, 1976 and Zorinsky was appointed in his place.

Republican hold

  1. Pennsylvania: Hugh Scott (R) retired and was replaced by John Heinz (R).

Republican gains

  1. Missouri: Stuart Symington (D) retired and was replaced by John Danforth (R).
    • Symington then resigned December 27, 1976 and Danforth was appointed to finish the term.
  2. Rhode Island: John O. Pastore (D) retired and was replaced by John Chafee (R).
    • Pastore then resigned December 28, 1976 and Chafee was appointed to finish the term.

Incumbents who lost

Republicans had a net gain of one seat from re-election gains.

Democratic gains

From Republicans

  1. Maryland: John Glenn Beall, Jr. (R) lost re-election to Paul Sarbanes (D).
  2. Ohio: Robert Taft, Jr. (R) lost re-election to former Senator Howard Metzenbaum (D).
    • Taft then resigned December 28, 1976. Metzenbaum was appointed to finish the term.
  3. Tennessee: Bill Brock (R) lost re-election to Jim Sasser (D).

From Conservatives

  1. New York: James L. Buckley (C) lost re-election as a Republican to Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D).

Republican gains

  1. California: John V. Tunney (D) lost re-election to S. I. Hayakawa (R).
    • Tunney then resigned January 1, 1977 and Hayakawa was appointed to finish the term.
  2. Indiana: Vance Hartke (D) lost re-election to Richard Lugar (R).
  3. New Mexico: Joseph Montoya (D) lost re-election to Harrison Schmitt (R).
  4. Utah: Frank Moss (D) lost re-election to Orrin Hatch (R).
  5. Wyoming: Gale W. McGee (D) lost re-election to Malcolm Wallop (R).

Results summary

Parties Total Seats Popular Vote
1974 1976 +/- Vote  %
Democratic Party 60 61 Increase 1 31,790,526 53.72%
Republican Party 37 38 Increase 1 24,562,431 41.51%
Independent 1 1 Steady 1,173,414 1.98%
American Party 0 0 Steady 204,556 0.35%
Socialist Worker's Party 0 0 Steady 125,528 0.21%
American Independent Party 0 0 Steady 110,921 0.19%
Libertarian Party 0 0 Steady 78,588 0.13%
Others 1 0 Decrease 1 1,128,043 1.91%
Total 100 100 Steady 59,174,007 100.0%

Source: "Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 2, 1976" (PDF). U.S. Government Printing Office. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 

Change in Senate composition

Before the elections

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40 D39 D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31
D41
Ran
D42
Ran
D43
Ran
D44
Ran
D45
Ran
D46
Ran
D47
Ran
D48
Ran
D49
Ran
D50
Ran
Majority → D51
Ran
D60
Retired
D59
Retired
D58
Retired
D57
Ran
D56
Ran
D55
Ran
D54
Ran
D53
Ran
D52
Ran
D61
Retired
I1
Ran
C1
Ran
R37
Retired
R36
Retired
R35
Retired
R34
Retired
R33
Ran
R32
Ran
R31
Ran
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28
Ran
R29
Ran
R30
Ran
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

After the general elections

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40 D39 D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31
D41
Re-elected
D42
Re-elected
D43
Re-elected
D44
Re-elected
D45
Re-elected
D46
Re-elected
D47
Re-elected
D48
Re-elected
D49
Re-elected
D50
Re-elected
Majority → D51
Re-elected
D60
Gain
D59
Gain
D58
Gain
D57
Gain
D56
Gain
D55
Gain
D54
Hold
D53
Hold
D52
Re-elected
D61
Gain
I1
Re-elected
R38
Gain
R37
Gain
R36
Gain
R35
Gain
R34
Gain
R33
Gain
R32
Gain
R31
Hold
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28
Re-elected
R29
Re-elected
R30
Re-elected
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10
Key:
C# Conservative (N.Y.)
D# Democratic
R# Republican
I# Independent

Race summaries

Elections leading to the next Congress

In these general elections, the winners were elected for the term beginning January 3, 1977; ordered by state.

All of the elections involved the Class 1 seats.

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Arizona Paul Fannin Republican 1964
1970
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Dennis DeConcini (Democratic) 54.0%
Sam Steiger (Republican) 43.3%
Allan Norwitz (Libertarian) 1.0%
California John V. Tunney Democratic 1970
1971 (Appointed)
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
S. I. Hayakawa (Republican) 50.2%
John V. Tunney (Democratic) 46.9%
Connecticut Lowell P. Weicker Jr. Republican 1970 Incumbent re-elected. Lowell P. Weicker Jr. (Republican) 57.7%
Gloria Schaffer (Democratic) 41.2%
Delaware Bill Roth Republican 1970
1971 (Appointed)
Incumbent re-elected. Bill Roth (Republican) 55.8%
Thomas C. Maloney (Democratic) 43.6%
Florida Lawton Chiles Democratic 1970 Incumbent re-elected. Lawton Chiles (Democratic) 63.0%
John Grady (Republican) 37.0%
Hawaii Hiram Fong Republican 1959
1964
1970
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Spark Matsunaga (Democratic) 53.7%
William F. Quinn (Republican) 40.6%
Indiana Vance Hartke Democratic 1958
1964
1970
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Richard Lugar (Republican) 58.8%
Vance Hartke (Democratic) 40.5%
Maine Edmund Muskie Democratic 1958
1964
1970
Incumbent re-elected. Edmund Muskie (Democratic) 60.2%
Robert A. G. Monks (Republican) 39.8%
Maryland John Glenn Beall Jr. Republican 1970 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Paul Sarbanes (Democratic) 56.5%
John Glenn Beall Jr. (Republican) 38.8%
Massachusetts Ted Kennedy Democratic 1962 (Special)
1964
1970
Incumbent re-elected. Ted Kennedy (Democratic) 69.3%
Michael S. Robertson (Republican) 29.0%
Carol Henderson Evans (Soc. Workers) 1.1%
H. Graham Lowry (U.S. Labor) 0.6%
Michigan Philip Hart Democratic 1958
1964
1970
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic hold.
Incumbent died December 26, 1976.
Winner appointed December 30, 1976.
Donald W. Riegle Jr. (Democratic) 52.5%
Marvin L. Esch (Republican) 46.8%
Minnesota Hubert Humphrey Democratic 1948
1954
1960
1964 (Resigned)
1970
Incumbent re-elected. Hubert Humphrey (Democratic) 67.5%
Gerald W. Brekke (Republican) 25.0%
Paul Helm (Independent) 6.6%
Mississippi John C. Stennis Democratic 1947 (Special)
1952
1958
1964
1970
Incumbent re-elected. John C. Stennis (Democratic)
Unopposed
Missouri Stuart Symington Democratic 1952
1958
1964
1970
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
John Danforth (Republican) 56.9%
Warren E. Hearnes (Democratic) 42.5%
Lawrence Petty (Independent) 0.6%
Montana Mike Mansfield Democratic 1952
1958
1964
1970
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic hold.
John Melcher (Democratic) 64.2%
Stanley C. Burger (Republican) 35.8%
Nebraska Roman Hruska Republican 1954 (Special)
1958
1964
1970
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Edward Zorinsky (Democratic) 52.4%
John Y. McCollister (Republican) 47.5%
Nevada Howard Cannon Democratic 1958
1964
1970
Incumbent re-elected. Howard Cannon (Democratic) 63.0%
David Towell (Republican) 31.4%
New Jersey Harrison A. Williams Democratic 1958
1964
1970
Incumbent re-elected. Harrison A. Williams (Democratic) 60.7%
David A. Norcross (Republican) 38.0%
New Mexico Joseph Montoya Democratic 1964 (Special)
1964
1970
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Harrison Schmitt (Republican) 56.8%
Joseph Montoya (Democratic) 42.7%
New York James L. Buckley Conservative 1970 Incumbent lost re-election as a Republican.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Daniel P. Moynihan (Democratic) 54.2%
James L. Buckley (Republican) 44.9%
North Dakota Quentin N. Burdick Democratic 1960 (Special)
1964
1970
Incumbent re-elected. Quentin N. Burdick (Democratic) 62.1%
Robert Stroup (Republican) 36.6%
Ohio Robert Taft Jr. Republican 1970 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Incumbent resigned December 28, 1976 to give successor preferential seniority.
Winner appointed December 29, 1976.
Howard Metzenbaum (Democratic) 49.5%
Robert Taft Jr. (Republican) 46.5%
Pennsylvania Hugh Scott Republican 1958
1964
1970
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican hold.
H. John Heinz III (Republican) 52.4%
William J. Green, III (Democratic) 46.8%
Rhode Island John O. Pastore Democratic 1950 (Special)
1952
1958
1964
1970
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican gain
Incumbent resigned December 28, 1976 to give successor preferential seniority.
Winner appointed December 29, 1976.
John Chafee (Republican) 57.7%
Richard P. Lorber (Democratic) 42.0%
Tennessee Bill Brock Republican 1970 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Jim Sasser (Democratic) 52.5%
Bill Brock (Republican) 47.0%
Texas Lloyd Bentsen Democratic 1970 Incumbent re-elected. Lloyd Bentsen (Democratic) 56.8%
Alan Steelman (Republican) 42.2%
Utah Frank Moss Democratic 1958
1964
1970
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Orrin Hatch (Republican) 53.7%
Frank Moss (Democratic) 44.8%
Vermont Robert Stafford Republican 1971 (Appointed)
1972 (Special)
Incumbent re-elected. Robert Stafford (Republican) 50.0%
Thomas P. Salmon (Democratic) 45.3%
Virginia Harry F. Byrd Jr. Independent 1933 (Appointed)
1933 (Special)
1934
1940
1946
1952
1958
1964
1970
Incumbent re-elected. Harry F. Byrd Jr. (Independent) 57.2%
Elmo R. Zumwalt Jr. (Democratic) 38.3%
Washington Henry M. Jackson Democratic 1952
1958
1964
1970
Incumbent re-elected. Henry M. Jackson (Democratic) 71.8%
George M. Brown (Republican) 24.2%
West Virginia Robert Byrd Democratic 1958
1964
1970
Incumbent re-elected. Robert Byrd (Democratic) 99.9%
Wisconsin William Proxmire Democratic 1957 (Special)
1958
1964
1970
Incumbent re-elected. William Proxmire (Democratic) 72.2%
Stanley York (Republican) 27.0%
Wyoming Gale W. McGee Democratic 1958
1964
1970
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Malcolm Wallop (Republican) 54.7%
Gale W. McGee (Democratic) 45.4%

Arizona

U.S. Senate election in Arizona, 1976
Arizona
← 1970
1982 →
  Dennis DeConcini.jpg Sam Steiger Congressional photo.jpg
Nominee Dennis DeConcini Sam Steiger
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 400,334 321,236
Percentage 54.0% 43.3%

1976 Arizona.png
U.S. Senate election results map.
Blue denotes counties won by DeConcini.
Red denotes those won by Steiger.

U.S. Senator before election

Paul Fannin
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Dennis DeConcini
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Paul Fannin decided to retire instead of seeking a third term. Democratic attorney and businessman Dennis DeConcini won the open seat over

General election results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dennis DeConcini 400,334 54.01%
Republican Sam Steiger 321,236 43.34%
Independent Bob Field 10,765 1.45%
Libertarian Allan Norwitz 7,310 0.99%
Independent Wm. Mathews Feighan 1,565 0.21%
Majority 79,098 8.68%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic gain from Republican

California

U.S. Senate election in California, 1976
California
← 1970
1982 →
  SIHayakawa.jpg JohnTunney.jpg
Nominee S. I. Hayakawa John V. Tunney
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 3,748,973 3,502,862
Percentage 50.1% 46.9%

U.S. Senator before election

John V. Tunney
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

S. I. Hayakawa
Republican

Incumbent Democrat John Tunney ran for re-election to a second term, but was defeated by Republican Sam Hayakawa, President emeritus of San Francisco State University.

General election results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican S. I. Hayakawa 3,748,973 50.12%
Democratic John V. Tunney (Incumbent) 3,502,862 46.89%
Peace and Freedom David Wald 104,383 1.40%
American Independent Jack McCoy 82,739 1.11%
Independent Omari Musa 31,629 0.42%
Majority 246,111 3.23%
Voter turnout  %
Republican gain from Democratic

Connecticut

U.S. Senate election in Connecticut, 1976
Connecticut
← 1970
1982 →
  Lweicker.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Lowell P. Weicker, Jr. Gloria Schaffer
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 785,683 561,018
Percentage 57.7% 41.2%

Connecticut R Sweep.svg
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Lowell P. Weicker, Jr.
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Lowell P. Weicker, Jr.
Republican

Incumbent Republican Lowell Weicker won re-election to a second term over Gloria Schaffer, Connecticut Secretary of State[3]

General election results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lowell P. Weicker, Jr. (Incumbent) 785,683 57.70%
Democratic Gloria Schaffer 561,018 41.20%
George Wallace Robert Barnabei 14,407 1.06%
Others 558 0.0%
Majority 224,665 16.50%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

Delaware

U.S. Senate election in Delaware, 1976
Delaware
← 1970
1982 →
  Senator William V Roth.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Bill Roth Thomas Maloney
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 125,454 98,042
Percentage 55.8% 43.6%

U.S. Senator before election

Bill Roth
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Bill Roth
Republican

Incumbent Republican Bill Roth won reelection to a second term over Thomas Maloney, Mayor of Wilmington[4]

General election results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Roth (Incumbent) 125,454 55.81%
Democratic Thomas Maloney 98,042 43.61%
American Donald G. Gies 646 0.29%
Non-Partisan Joseph F. McInerney 437 0.19%
Prohibition John A. Massimilla 216 0.0%
Majority 27,412 12.20%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

Florida

U.S. Senate election in Florida, 1976
Florida
← 1970
1982 →
  Senator Lawton Chiles.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Lawton Chiles John Grady
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,799,518 1,057,886
Percentage 63.0% 37.0%

U.S. Senator before election

Lawton Chiles
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Lawton Chiles
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Lawton Chiles won re-election to a second term over John Grady, Mayor of Belle Glade[5]

General election results[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lawton Chiles 1,799,518 63.0
Republican John Grady 1,057,886 37.0
Write-In Ed Ice 123 0.0
Write-In Tim Adams 7 0.0

Hawaii

U.S. Senate election in Hawaii, 1976
Hawaii
← 1970
1982 →
  Spark Matsunaga.jpg William F. Quinn (PP-28-3-011).jpg
Nominee Spark Matsunaga William Quinn
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 162,305 122,724
Percentage 53.7% 40.6%

Hawaii Election Results by County, all Democratic.svg
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Hiram Fong
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Spark Matsunaga
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Hiram Fong decided to retire instead of seeking re-election to a fourth term. Democrat Spark Matsunaga won the open seat over Republican William Quinn , Former Governor of Hawaii.

General election results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Spark Matsunaga 162,305 53.7%
Republican William Quinn 122,724 40.6%
People's Anthony Hodges 14,226 4.7%
Nonpartisan James Kimmel 1,433 0.5%
Libertarian Rockne Hart Johnson 1,404 0.5%

Indiana

U.S. Senate election in Indiana, 1976
Indiana
← 1970
1982 →
  Richard Lugar 1977 congressional photo.jpg Vance Hartke.jpg
Nominee Richard Lugar Vance Hartke
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 1,275,833 868,522
Percentage 59.0% 40.2%

U.S. Senator before election

Vance Hartke
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Richard Lugar
Republican

Incumbent Democrat Vance Hartke ran for re-election to a fourth term, but was defeated by Republican challenger Richard Lugar, Mayor of Indianapolis.

General election results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Richard Lugar 1,275,833 59.03%
Democratic Vance Hartke (Incumbent) 868,522 40.19%
Don L. Lee 14,321 0.66%
U.S. Labor David Lee Hoagland 2,511 0.12%
Majority 407,311 18.85%
Voter turnout  %
Republican gain from Democratic

Maine

U.S. Senate election in Maine, 1976
Maine
← 1970
1982 →
  Edmund Muskie.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Edmund Muskie Robert A. G. Monks
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 292,704 193,489
Percentage 60.2% 39.8%

U.S. Senator before election

Edmund Muskie
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Edmund Muskie
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Edmund Muskie won re-election to a fourth term over Republican Robert A. G. Monks, shareholder activist.

General election results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Edmund Muskie 292,704 60.20%
Republican Robert A. G. Monks 193,489 39.80%
Majority 99,215 20.41%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

Maryland

U.S. Senate election in Maryland, 1976
Maryland
← 1970
1982 →
  Paul Sarbanes.jpg Jglennbealljr.jpg
Nominee Paul Sarbanes John Glenn Beall, Jr.
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 772,101 530,439
Percentage 56.6% 38.9%

U.S. Senator before election

John Glenn Beall, Jr.
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Paul Sarbanes
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Glenn Beall Jr. ran for re-election to a second term, but was defeated by Democratic challenger Paul Sarbanes, member of the U.S. House of Representatives.

General election results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Paul Sarbanes 772,101 56.55%
Republican John Glenn Beall, Jr. 530,439 38.85%
Independent Bruce Bradley 62,750 4.60%
Majority 241,662 17.70%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic gain from Republican

Massachusetts

U.S. Senate election in Massachusetts, 1976
Massachusetts
← 1970
1982 →
  Edward Kennedy.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Ted Kennedy Michael Robertson
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,726,657 722,641
Percentage 69.3% 29.0%

Massachusetts Election Results by County, all Democratic.svg
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Ted Kennedy
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Ted Kennedy
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Ted Kennedy won re-election to his third full term over Republican businessman, Michael Robertson[8]

General election[2]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Edward M. Kennedy (Incumbent) 1,726,657 69.31 +7.15
Republican Micheal S. Robertson 722,641 29.01 -7.99
Socialist Workers Carol Henderson Evans 26,283 1.06 +0.52
U.S. Labor H. Graham Lowry 15,517 0.62
All others 157 0.01
Total votes 2,491,255 85.55%

Michigan

U.S. Senate election in Michigan, 1976
Michigan
← 1970
1982 →
  Don Riegle, Jr.jpg MarvinEsch.jpg
Nominee Don Riegle Marvin Esch
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,831,031 1,635,087
Percentage 52.5% 46.9%

U.S. Senator before election

Philip Hart
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Don Riegle
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Philip Hart decided to retire instead of seeking a fourth term. Democrat Don Riegle, member of the U.S. House of Representatives, won the open seat over fellow congressman Republican

General election results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Donald W. Riegle, Jr. 1,831,031 52.46%
Republican Marvin L. Esch 1,635,087 46.85%
Libertarian Bette Jane Erwin 8,842 <1%
Human Rights Theodore G. Albert 7,281 <1%
Socialist Workers Paula L. Reimers 3,399 <1%
Socialist Labor Frank Girard 2,554 <1%
U.S. Labor Peter A. Signorelli 2,218 <1%
Majority 195,944 5.61%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

Minnesota

U.S. Senate election in Minnesota, 1976
Minnesota
← 1970
1982 →
  H Humphrey.jpg No image.svg No image.svg
Nominee Hubert Humphrey Jerry Brekke Paul Helm
Party Democratic Republican American Independent
Popular vote 1,290,736 478,602 125,612
Percentage 67.5% 25.0% 6.6%

U.S. Senator before election

Hubert Humphrey
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Hubert Humphrey
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Hubert Humphrey won re-election to a fifth term over Republican Gerald Brekke, college professor[9]

General election results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Hubert Humphrey 1,290,736 67.51%
Republican Gerald W. Brekke 478,602 25.03%
American Independent Paul Helm 125,612 6.57%
Socialist Workers Bill Peterson 9,380 0.49%
Libertarian Robin E. Miller 5,476 0.29%
Communist Matt Savola 2,214 0.12%
Majority 686,522 35.91%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

Mississippi

U.S. Senate election in Mississippi, 1976
Mississippi
← 1970
1982 →
  JohnCStennis.jpg
Nominee John C. Stennis
Party Democratic
Popular vote 554,433
Percentage 100.0%

U.S. Senator before election

John C. Stennis
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

John C. Stennis
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat John C. Stennis won re-election to his sixth term.

General election results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Stennis 554,433 100.0

Missouri

U.S. Senate election in Missouri, 1976
Missouri
← 1970
1982 →
  JohnDanforth.jpg Warren Hearnes 1969.jpg
Nominee John Danforth Warren E. Hearnes
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 1,090,067 813,571
Percentage 56.9% 42.5%

U.S. Senator before election

Stuart Symington
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

John Danforth
Republican

Incumbent Democrat Stuart Symington decided to retire, instead of seeking a fifth term. Republican John Danforth, Attorney General of Missouri, won the open seat, defeating Democrat Warren Hearnes, former Governor of Missouri. (Jerry Litton had won the Democratic nomination earlier, but was killed in a plane crash, and Hearnes was chosen by the party committee.)

General election results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Danforth 1,090,067 56.94%
Democratic Warren E. Hearnes 813,571 42.50%
Independent Lawrence "Red" Petty 10,822 0.57%
Majority 276,496 14.44%
Voter turnout  %
Republican gain from Democratic

Montana

U.S. Senate election in Montana, 1976
Montana
← 1970
1982 →
  John Melcher.jpg No image.svg
Nominee John Melcher Stanley Burger
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 206,232 115,213
Percentage 64.16% 35.84%

U.S. Senator before election

Mike Mansfield
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

John Melcher
Democratic

Rather than seek a fifth term, Democratic incumbent Mike Mansfield opted to retire, creating an open seat. United States Congressman John Melcher, who had represented Montana's 2nd congressional district from 1969 to 1977, won the Democratic nomination and defeated Stanley C. Burger, the Republican nominee and former Executive Officer of the Montana Farm Bureau Federation, by a wide margin in the general election.

Democratic Party primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jack Melcher 89,413 88.52
Democratic Ray E. Gulick 11,593 11.48
Total votes 101,006 100.00
Republican Primary results[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Stanley C. Burger 32,313 40.41
Republican Dave Drum 27,257 34.09
Republican Jack Tierney 15,129 18.92
Republican Larry L. Gilbert 5,258 6.58
Total votes 79,957 100.00
United States Senate election in Montana, 1976[2]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic John Melcher 206,232 64.16% +3.62%
Republican Stanley C. Burger 115,213 35.84% -3.62%
Majority 91,019 28.32% +7.24%
Turnout 321,445
Democratic hold Swing

Nebraska

U.S. Senate election in Nebraska, 1976
Nebraska
← 1970
1982 →
  1985 p78 Edward Zorinsky.jpg John Y. McCollister.jpg
Nominee Edward Zorinsky John Y. McCollister
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 313,805 279,284
Percentage 52.89% 47.07%

U.S. Senator before election

Roman Hruska
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Edward Zorinsky
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Roman Hruska decided to retire instead of seeking another term. Democrat Edward Zorinsky, Mayor of Omaha, won the open seat over Republican John Y. McCollister, U.S. Congressman of Nebraska's 2nd congressional district.

General election results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Edward Zorinsky 313,805 52.89%
Republican John Y. McCollister 279,284 47.07%
Write-in candidate Lenore Etchison 58 0.01%
N/A Others 163 0.03%
Majority 34,521 5.82%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic gain from Republican

Nevada

U.S. Senate election in Nevada, 1976
Nevada
← 1970
1982 →
  Howard Cannon.jpg David Towell.jpg
Nominee Howard Cannon David Towell
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 127,214 63,471
Percentage 63.0% 31.4%

U.S. Senator before election

Howard Cannon
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Howard Cannon
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Howard Cannon won re-election to a fourth term over Republican David Towell, U.S. Representative from Nevada's At-large congressional district.

In the Senate, Cannon was known as a moderate in the Democratic Party. He served as chairman of several committees, including the rules committee and the inaugural arrangements committee. Cannon was nearly defeated for re-election in 1964 by Republican Lieutenant Governor Paul Laxalt in one of the closest election in history. However, he became more popular over the next few years and won re-election in 1970 with nearly 58% of the vote. In 1976, he faced U.S. Representative David Towell, who served just one term in the U.S. House of Representatives before running for the U.S. Senate. Cannon won re-election with 63% of the vote, one of his best election performances of his career. He won every county in the state, except for Eureka County, which Towell won with just 51% of the vote.

General election results[2]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Howard Cannon (inc.) 127,214 63.01% +5.36%
Republican David Towell 63,471 31.44% -9.73%
None of These Candidates 5,288 2.62%
Independent American (Nev.) Byron D. Young 3,619 1.79%
Libertarian Dan Becan 2,307 1.14%
Majority 63,743 31.57% +15.09%
Turnout 201,899
Democratic hold Swing

New Jersey

New Mexico

U.S. Senate election in New Mexico, 1976
New Mexico
← 1970
1982 →
  Sen Harrison Schmitt.jpg Joseph M Montoya.jpg
Nominee Harrison Schmitt Joseph Montoya
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 234,681 176,382
Percentage 56.8% 42.7%

New Mexico Senatorial Election Results by County, 1976.svg
County results

U.S. Senator before election

Joseph Montoya
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Harrison Schmitt
Republican

Incumbent Democrat Joseph Montoya ran for re-election to a third term, but was defeated by Republican former Astronaut Harrison Schmitt.

General election results[2]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Harrison Schmitt 234,681 56.82% +9.69%
Democratic Joseph Montoya (inc.) 176,382 42.70% -10.17%
La Raza Unida Ernesto B. Borunda 1,087 0.26%
American Independent Matt Dillion 906 0.22%
Majority 58,299 14.11% +8.36%
Turnout 413,056
Republican gain from Democratic Swing

New York

U.S. Senate election in New York, 1976
New York (state)
← 1970
1982 →
  DanielPatrickMoynihan.jpg JamesLBuckley.jpg
Nominee Pat Moynihan James Buckley
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 3,422,594 2,836,633
Percentage 54.1% 44.9%

NewYorkSenatorial1976.svg
County results

U.S. Senator before election

James Buckley
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Pat Moynihan
Democratic

Incumbent Conservative James Buckley ran for re-election to a second term as a Republican, but was defeated by Pat Moynihan.

Democratic Party Convention results[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Paul O'Dwyer 32.50
Democratic Pat Moynihan 31.10
Democratic Bella Abzug 28.70
Democratic Ramsey Clark 7.00
Democratic Abraham Hirschfeld 0.70
Total votes ' 100.00
Democratic Party Primary results[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pat Moynihan 333,697 36.41
Democratic Bella Abzug 323,705 35.32
Democratic Ramsey Clark 94,191 10.28
Democratic Paul O'Dwyer 82,689 9.02
Democratic Abraham Hirschfeld 82,331 8.98
Total votes 916,613 100.00
Republican Party Primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican James Buckley (Incumbent) 242,257 70.45
Republican Peter Peyser 101,629 29.55
Total votes 343,886 100.00
General election results[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Pat Moynihan 3,238,511
Liberal Pat Moynihan 184,083
total Pat Moynihan 3,422,594 54.17 + 17.21
Republican James Buckley (incumbent) 2,525,139
Conservative (N.Y.) James Buckley 311,494
total James Buckley 2,836,633 44.90 + 5.95
Communist Herbert Aptheker 25,141 0.40 + 0.37
Socialist Workers Marcia Gallo 16,350 0.26 + 0.20
Libertarian Martin E. Nixon 10,943 0.17 + 0.17
U.S. Labor Elijah C. Boyd 6,716 0.11 + 0.11

North Dakota

The 1976 U.S. Senate election for the state of North Dakota was held November 2, 1976. The incumbent, North Dakota Democratic NPL Party (Dem-NPL) Senator Quentin Burdick, sought and received re-election to his fourth term to the United States Senate, defeating Republican candidate Robert Stroup. [2] Only Burdick filed as a Dem-NPLer, and the endorsed Republican candidate was Robert Stroup, as state senator from Hazen, North Dakota. Burdick and Stroup won the primary elections for their respective parties. One independent candidate, Clarence Haggard, also filed before the deadline under the American Party.

1976 United States Senate election, North Dakota
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Quentin Burdick (incumbent) 175,772 62.10
Republican Robert Stroup 103,466 36.55
Independent Clarence Haggard 3,824 1.35
Majority
Voter turnout  %

Ohio

U.S. Senate election in Ohio, 1976
Ohio
← 1970
1982 →
  Howard Metzenbaum.jpg RobertTaftJr (cropped).jpg
Nominee Howard Metzenbaum Robert Taft, Jr.
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,941,113 1,823,774
Percentage 49.51% 46.52%

U.S. Senator before election

Robert Taft, Jr.
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Howard Metzenbaum
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Robert Taft, Jr. ran for re-election to second term, but was defeated by Democratic former Senator Howard Metzenbaum.

Results

General election results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Howard Metzenbaum 1,941,113 49.51%
Republican Robert Taft, Jr. 1,823,774 46.52%
Independent John O'Neill 53,657 1.37%
American Independent Donald E. Babcock 36,979 0.94%
Independent Emma Lila Fundaburk 33,285 0.85%
Socialist Workers Melissa Singler 31,805 0.81%
Majority 117,339 2.99%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic gain from Republican

Pennsylvania

U.S. Senate election in Pennsylvania, 1976
Pennsylvania
← 1970
1982 →
  John Heinz.jpg William J. Green.jpg
Nominee John Heinz Bill Green
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 2,381,891 2,126,977
Percentage 52.4% 46.8%

Pennsylvania Senatorial Election Results by County, 1976.svg

U.S. Senator before election

Hugh Scott
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

John Heinz
Republican

Incumbent Republican and Minority Leader Hugh Scott decided to retire. Republican John Heinz won the open seat over Democrat Bill Green, United States Representative[15][2]

In December 1975, U.S. senator Hugh Scott announced that he would not seek re-election in 1976 at the age of 75 after serving in Congress for 33 years. Scott listed personal reasons and several "well-qualified potential candidates" for the seat among the reasons of his decision to retire. Other reasons, including his support for Richard Nixon and accusations that he had illegally obtained contributions from Gulf Oil were alleged to have contributed to the decision.[16]

Democratic primary results[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic William J. Green III 762,733 68.71
Democratic Jeanette Reibman 345,264 31.10
Democratic Others 2,058 0.19
Republican primary results[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican H. John Heinz III 358,715 37.73
Republican Arlen Specter 332,513 34.98
Republican George Packard 160,379 16.87
Republican Others 99,074 10.43

Heinz was the victor in all but nine counties, defeating opponent William Green, who had a 300,000 vote advantage in his native Philadelphia area. Heinz and Green spend $2.5 million and $900,000, respectively, during the ten-month campaign. Much of the money Heinz spent on his campaign was his own, leading to accusations from Green that he was "buying the seat". Heinz replied to this by claiming that the spending was necessary to overcome the Democratic voter registration advantage.[19]

General election results[2]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican H. John Heinz III 2,381,891 52.39% +0.96%
Democratic William J. Green III 2,126,977 46.79% +1.41%
Constitution Andrew J. Watson 26,028 0.57% -1.79%
Socialist Workers Frederick W. Stanton 5,484 0.12% +0.01%
Labor Party Bernard Salera 3,637 0.08% +0.08%
Communist Party Frank Kinces 2,097 0.05% +0.05%
N/A Other 239 0.00% N/A
Totals 4,546,353 100.00%

Rhode Island

U.S. Senate election in Rhode Island, 1976
Rhode Island
← 1970
1982 →
  John Chafee.jpg No image.svg
Nominee John Chafee Richard P. Lorber
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 230,329 167,665
Percentage 57.7% 42.0%

Rhode Island Election Results by County, all Republican.svg
County results

U.S. Senator before election

John O. Pastore
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

John Chafee
Republican

Incumbent Democrat John O. Pastore did not seek re-election. Republican John Chafee won the seat, defeating Democrat Richard P. Lorber.

Democratic primary results[20]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Richard P. Lorber 60,118 37.78
Democratic Philip W. Noel 60,018 37.71
Democratic John P. Hawkins 25,456 16.00
Democratic Paul E. Goulding 5,500 3.46
Democratic Ralph J. Perrotta 4,481 2.82
Democratic John E. Caddick 2,160 1.36
Democratic Earl F. Pasbach 962 0.60
Democratic Arthur E. Marley 447 0.28
Majority 100 0.06%
Total votes 159,142 100.00
General election results[21][2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Chafee 230,329 57.74
Democratic Richard P. Lorber 167,665 42.03
Communist Margaret Cann 912 0.23
Majority 62,664 15.71%
Total votes 398,906 100.00
Republican gain from Democratic

Tennessee

U.S. election in Tennessee, 1976
Tennessee
← 1970
1982 →
  Jim sasser.jpg Bill brock.jpg
Nominee James Sasser Bill Brock
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 751,180 673,231
Percentage 52.46% 47.01%

U.S. Senator before election

Bill Brock
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

James Sasser
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Bill Brock ran for re-election to a second term, but was defeated by Democratic challenger James Sasser.

General election Results[2]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic James Sasser 751,180 52.46%
Republican Bill Brock (Incumbent) 673,231 47.01% -5.44%
Majority
Turnout
Democratic gain from Republican Swing

Texas

U.S. Senate election in Texas, 1976
Texas
← 1970
1982 →
  Lloyd Bentsen, bw photo as senator.jpg Alan Steelman.jpg
Nominee Lloyd Bentsen Alan Steelman
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 2,199,956 1,636,370
Percentage 56.8% 42.2%

U.S. Senator before election

Lloyd Bentsen
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Lloyd Bentsen
Democratic

Incumbent Democrat Lloyd Bentsen won re-election to a second term over Republican Alan Steelman, U.S. Representative from Texas's 5th district.

General election results[22]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lloyd Bentsen 2,199,956 56.8%
Republican Alan Steelman 1,636,370 42.2%
Socialist Workers Party Pedro Vasquez 20,549 0.5%
American Independent Marjorie P. Gallion 17,355 0.5%

Utah

U.S. Senate election in Utah, 1976
Utah
← 1970
1982 →
  Orrin Hatch 1977 congressional photo.jpg Frank Moss.jpg
Nominee Orrin Hatch Frank Moss
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 290,221 223,948
Percentage 55.59% 42.89%

U.S. Senator before election

Frank Moss
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Orrin Hatch
Republican

Incumbent Democrat Frank Moss ran for re-election to a fourth term but was defeated by his Republican opponent Orrin Hatch.

General election results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Orrin Hatch 290,221 55.59%
Democratic Frank Moss (Incumbent) 223,948 42,89%
Majority
Voter turnout  %
Republican gain from Democratic

Vermont

U.S. Senate election in Vermont, 1976
Vermont
← 1972 November 2, 1976 (1976-11-02) 1982 →
  Robert Theodore Stafford.jpg Thomas P. Salmon.jpg
Nominee Robert Stafford Thomas P. Salmon
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 94,481 85,682
Percentage 50.0% 45.4%

U.S. Senator before election

Robert Stafford
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Robert Stafford
Republican

Incumbent Republican Robert Stafford successfully ran for re-election to another term in the United States Senate, defeating Democratic candidate Governor Thomas P. Salmon.

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert Stafford (Incumbent) 24,338 68.7
Republican John J. Welch 10,911 30.8
Republican Other 178 0.5
Total votes 35,427 100
Democratic primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Thomas P. Salmon 21,674 52.7
Democratic Scott Skinner 19,238 46.8
Democratic Other 178 0.4
Total votes 41,090 100
United States Senate election in Vermont, 1976[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert Stafford (Incumbent) 94,481 50.0
Democratic Thomas P. Salmon 82,174 43.5
Independent Vermonters Thomas P. Salmon 3,508 1.9
Total Thomas P. Salmon 85,682 45.4
Liberty Union Nancy Kaufman 8,801 4.7
N/A Other 96 0.1
Total votes 189,060 100

Virginia

U.S. Senate election in Virginia, 1976
Virginia
← 1970
1982 →
Turnout 47.0%[25]
  Hbyrdjr.jpg Elmo Zumwalt.jpg
Nominee Harry F. Byrd, Jr. Elmo Zumwalt
Party Independent Democratic
Popular vote 890,778 596,009
Percentage 57.2% 38.3%

1976 virginia senate election map.png
U.S. Senate election results map. Gray denotes counties/districts won by Byrd. Blue denotes those won by Zumwalt. Red denotes those won by Perper.

U.S. Senator before election

Harry F. Byrd, Jr.
Independent

Elected U.S. Senator

Harry F. Byrd, Jr.
Independent

Incumbent Independent Harry F. Byrd, Jr. was re-elected to a second term over retired Admiral Elmo Zumwalt and state legislator Martin H. Perper.

United States Senate election in Virginia, 1976[25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Harry F. Byrd, Jr. (inc.) 890,778 57.19% +3.65%
Democratic Elmo Zumwalt 596,009 38.27% +7.12%
Independent Martin H. Perper 70,559 4.53%
Write-ins 154 0.01%
Majority 294,769 18.93% -3.45%
Turnout 1,557,500
Independent hold

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

See also

References

  1. ^ Harry F. Byrd Jr. (VA) was an Independent who caucused with the Democrats. In some circles he is called an "Independent Democrat," but his actual registration was listed as "Independent." See, e.g., United States Congress. "Harry Flood Byrd, Jr. (id: B001209)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v "Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 2, 1976" (PDF). U.S. Government Printing Office. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  3. ^ https://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/latimes/access/642322692.html?dids=642322692:642322692&FMT=ABS&FMTS=ABS:AI&type=historic&date=Nov+03%2C+1976&author=&pub=Los+Angeles+Times&desc=Stateby-State+Roundup+of+Major+Election+Races&pqatl=google
  4. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=PYwqAAAAIBAJ&sjid=JVgEAAAAIBAJ&pg=5675,317215&dq=thomas+maloney&hl=en
  5. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/CandidateDetail.html?CandidateID=8257
  6. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=6290
  7. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=2524
  8. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=VXkqAAAAIBAJ&sjid=hl0DAAAAIBAJ&pg=6481,1961525&dq=michael+robertson&hl=en
  9. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=Wf4yAAAAIBAJ&sjid=LYUDAAAAIBAJ&pg=7042,3318275&dq=jerry+brekke&hl=en
  10. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=6289
  11. ^ a b "Report of the Official Canvass of the Vote Cast at the Primary Election Held in the State of Montana, June 1, 1976". Montana Secretary of State. Retrieved July 2, 2014. 
  12. ^ a b "Our Campaigns - NY US Senate - D Primary Race - Sep 14, 1976". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved July 16, 2017. 
  13. ^ "Our Campaigns - NY US Senate - C Convention Race - Apr 07, 1970". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved July 16, 2017. 
  14. ^ "Our Campaigns - NY US Senate Race - Nov 02, 1976". www.ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved July 16, 2017. 
  15. ^ "GREEN, William Joseph, (born 1938)". Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress. Retrieved August 13, 2011. 
  16. ^ "Senate Republican leader Hugh Scott won't run in 1976". St. Petersburg Times. December 5, 1975. Retrieved August 14, 2011. 
  17. ^ "PA US Senate - D Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved August 14, 2011. 
  18. ^ "PA US Senate - R Primary". Our Campaigns. Retrieved August 14, 2011. 
  19. ^ "John Heinz". Gettysburg Times. November 3, 1976. Retrieved August 14, 2011. 
  20. ^ "RI US Senate - D Primary". OurCampaigns. Retrieved March 16, 2014. 
  21. ^ "RI US Senate". OurCampaigns. Retrieved March 16, 2014. 
  22. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=6275
  23. ^ a b "Primary Election Results" (PDF). Office of the Vermont Secretary of State. Retrieved June 16, 2015. 
  24. ^ "General Election Results - U.S. Senator - 1914-2014" (PDF). Office of the Vermont Secretary of State. Retrieved June 16, 2015. 
  25. ^ a b "1976 Senatorial General Election Results - Virginia". 
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=United_States_Senate_elections,_1976&oldid=803302635"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Senate_elections,_1976
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "United States Senate elections, 1976"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA