2012 United States House of Representatives elections in New Jersey

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2012 United States House of Representatives elections in New Jersey

← 2010 November 6, 2012 (2012-11-06) 2014 →

All 12 New Jersey seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 6 6
Seats won 6 6
Seat change Decrease 1 Steady
Popular vote 1,794,301[1] 1,430,325[1]
Percentage 54.67% 43.58%
Swing Increase 4.93% Decrease 4.72%

New Jersey 2012.png
Results:
      Democratic hold       Democratic gain
      Republican hold       Republican gain

The 2012 United States House of Representatives elections in New Jersey were held on Tuesday, November 6, 2012 and elected the 12 U.S. Representatives from the state of New Jersey, a loss of one seat following the 2010 United States Census. The elections coincided with the elections of other federal and state offices, including a quadrennial presidential election and an election to the U.S. Senate.

Overview

United States House of Representatives elections in New Jersey, 2012[2]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Democratic 1,794,301 54.67% 6 -1
Republican 1,430,325 43.58% 6 -
Green 11,183 0.34% 0 -
Libertarian 9,396 0.29% 0 -
Others 36,573 1.11% 0 -
Totals 3,281,778 100.00% 12 -1

Redistricting

Redistricting in New Jersey is the responsibility of the New Jersey Redistricting Commission, comprising six Democrats and six Republicans. If a majority of the 12 cannot reach an agreement, a neutral 13th person serves as a mediator or tie-breaker.[3] On December 23, 2011, the Commission voted 7–6 for a map supported by Republicans.[4]

District 1

In redistricting, Cherry Hill Township was added to the 1st district, while Riverton and parts of East Greenwich Township and Mantua Township were removed from the district.[5] Democrat Rob Andrews, who has represented the 1st district since 1990, ran for re-election. Francis Tenaglio, a former Pennsylvania state Representative who ran for Governor in 2005, challenged Andrews in the Democratic primary.[6]

Gregory Horton, the athletic director of Clearview Regional High School, ran unopposed the Republican nomination.[7]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
Declined

Results

Democratic primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rob Andrews (Incumbent) 21,318 88.40
Democratic Francis Tenaglio 2,797 11.60
Turnout 24,115

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared

Results

Republican primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Gregory Horton 11,189 100.00
Turnout 11,189

General Election

Results

New Jersey's 1st Congressional District, 2012[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rob Andrews (Incumbent) 210,470 68.22
Republican Gregory Horton 92,459 29.97
Green John Reitter 4,413 1.43
Reform Margaret Chapman 1,177 0.38
Majority 118,011 38.25
Total votes 308,519
Democratic hold
External links
  • Rob Andrews campaign website
  • Gregory Horton campaign website

District 2

In redistricting, Barnegat Light, Bass River Township, Beach Haven, Eagleswood Township, Harvey Cedars, Little Egg Harbor, Long Beach Township, Ship Bottom, Stafford Township, Surf City, Tuckerton, Washington Township and part of Mantua Township were added to the district.[5] Republican Frank LoBiondo, who represented the 2nd district since 1995, sought re-election. Mike Assad, a member of the Absecon Board of Education, challenged LoBiondo in the Republican primary.

David W Bowen Sr., a Businessman, a Real Estate Investor and Public Speaker, ran as an Independent.[7][9]

Cassandra Shober, an office manager, won the Democratic nomination.[7] Democratic State Senator Jeff Van Drew will not run.[10]

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Frank LoBiondo, incumbent U.S. Representative
  • Mike Assad, school board member

Results

Republican primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Frank LoBiondo (Incumbent) 20,551 87.58
Republican Mike Assad 2,914 12.42
Turnout 23,465

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Viola Hughes, former Mayor of Fairfield Township and nominee for this seat in 2006
  • Gary Stein, candidate for the General Assembly in 2011
  • Cassandra Shober, office manager
Declined

Results

Democratic primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Cassandra Shober 9,810 64.93
Democratic Viola Hughes 3,971 26.28
Democratic Gary Stein 1,327 8.78
Turnout 15,108

General election

Results

New Jersey's 2nd Congressional District, 2012[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Frank LoBiondo (Incumbent) 166,679 57.66
Democratic Cassandra Shober 116,463 40.29
Libertarian John Ordille 2,699 0.93
Constitutional Conservative Charles Lukens 1,329 0.46
The People's Agenda David Bowen 1,010 0.35
Conservative, Compassionate, Creative Frank Faralli 892 0.31
Majority 50,216 17.37
Total votes 289,072
Republican hold
External links
  • David W Bowen campaign website
  • Mike Assad campaign website
  • Frank LoBiondo campaign website

District 3

In redistricting, the 3rd district was made more favorable to Republicans. Parts of Burlington County, including Riverton and Shamong Township, and Brick Township and Mantoloking in Ocean County were added to the district, while Cherry Hill and Bass River were removed.[12] Republican Jon Runyan, who has represented the 3rd district since January 2011, sought re-election. Justin Murphy, a former member of the Tabernacle Township Committee and unsuccessful Republican primary candidate for the seat in 2010, declined to run.[13]

Former U.S. Representative John Adler, who represented the 3rd district from 2009 until 2011 but lost re-election in 2010, had planned to run again; however, Adler died in April 2011.[12] Shelley Adler, an of counsel attorney and the widow of the former congressman, ran unopposed for the Democratic nomination. Thomas Sacks-Wilner, a medical doctor who was considering a bid for the Democratic nomination, declined to run.[14]

Frederick John LaVergne of Delanco, New Jersey, ran as a "Democratic-Republican" Democratic-Republican Party - the party designation of Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, and John Quincy Adams.

Robert Witterschein, an accountant, ran as an Independent.[15]

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared
Declined

Results

Republican primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jon Runyan (Incumbent) 22,013 100.00
Turnout 22,013

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
Declined
  • Thomas Sacks-Wilner, physician

Results

Democratic primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Shelley Adler 15,176 100.00
Turnout 15,176

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Jon
Runyan (R)
Shelley
Adler (D)
Other Undecided
Stockton College September 28–October 2, 2012 614 ± ? 49% 39% 3% 8%

[16]

Results

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District, 2012[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jon Runyan (Incumbent) 174,253 53.71
Democratic Shelley Adler 145,509 44.85
Legalize Marijuana Robert Forchion 1,965 0.61
Bob's for Jobs Robert Shapiro 1,104 0.34
D-R Party Frederick John Lavergne 770 0.24
None of Them Robert Witterschein 530 0.16
No Slogan Christopher Dennick 280 0.09
Majority 28,747 8.86
Total votes 186,103
Republican hold
External links
  • Shelley Adler campaign website
  • Jon Runyan campaign website
  • Robert Witterschein campaign website

District 4

In redistricting, parts of Burlington County were removed from the district.[12] Republican Chris Smith, who has represented the 4th congressional district since 1981, sought re-election. Terrence McGowan, a retired firefighter, police officer, and Navy SEAL, challenged Smith in the Republican primary.[6][17]

Brian Froelich, a retired executive and business consultant, ran unopposed for the Democratic nomination. Patricia Bennett, an attorney, had also planned to run but dropped out.[18][19]

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared

Results

Republican primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chris Smith (Incumbent) 21,520 83.64
Republican Terrence McGowan 4,209 14.64
Turnout 25,729

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Brian Froelich, retired business consultant
Withdrew
  • Patricia Bennett, attorney
  • Doug DeMeo[20]

Results

Democratic primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brian Froelich 12,110 100.00
Turnout 12,110

General election

Results

New Jersey's 4th Congressional District, 2014[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chris Smith (Incumbent) 195,146 63.72
Democratic Brian Froelich 107,992 35.26
Independent Leonard Marshall 3,111 1.02
Majority 87,154 28.46
Total votes 306,247
Republican hold
External links
  • Brian Froelich campaign website
  • Terrence McGowan campaign website
  • Chris Smith campaign website

District 5

Republican Scott Garrett, who has represented the 5th district since 2003, successfully sought re-election.[4] Michael Cino, an oil executive who challenged Garrett in the Republican primary in 2006, will run again.[21] Garret won the Republican primary by a fairly comfortable margin.

Jason Castle, an information technology executive and Marine;[22] Adam Gussen, the deputy mayor of Teaneck;[23] and Diane Sare, a chorus director and LaRouche political organizer,[24] all ran for the Democratic nomination to challenge Garrett; Gussen eventually won the primary. Terry Duffy, the director of the Passaic County Board of Chosen Freeholders, had planned to run[25] but ended his bid in March 2012.[26] Harry Carson, a former linebacker for the New York Giants;[27] former Bergen County Sheriff Leo McGuire;[28] Jim McQueeny, a public relations executive and former News12 anchor;[29] and state assemblywoman Connie Wagner,[30] will not run. Steve Rothman, a Democrat who has represented the 9th district since 1997 and was expected to seek re-election in the 5th district,[4] instead ran in the 9th district.[31]

Patricia Alessandrini ran as a candidate of the Green Party for the seat.[32]

Mark Quick, a former member of the Warren County Republican Committee who challenged Garrett as an Independent in 2010, had stated that he would as a candidate of the Reform Party of New Jersey.[33] He withdrew from the race and did not qualify for the ballot.[32]

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Scott Garrett, incumbent U.S. Representative
  • Michael Cino, oil executive and candidate for this seat in 2006
  • Bonnie Somer

Results

Republican primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott Garrett (Incumbent) 24,709 87.23
Republican Michael Cino 2,107 7.44
Republican Bonnie Somer 1,511 5.33
Turnout 24,709

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
Withdrew
Declined

Results

Democratic primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Adam Gussen 10,208 54.94
Democratic Jason Castle 6,448 34.70
Democratic Diane Sare 1,925 10.36
Turnout 18,581

General election

Results

New Jersey's 5th Congressional District, 2012[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott Garrett (Incumbent) 167,501 55.03
Democratic Adam Gussen 130,100 42.74
Green Patricia Alessandrini 6,770 2.22
Majority 37,401 12.29
Total votes 304,371
Republican hold
External links
  • Jason Castle campaign website
  • Michael Cino campaign website
  • Scott Garrett campaign website
  • Adam Gussen campaign website
  • Mark Quick campaign website
  • Diane Sare campaign website

District 6

Democrat Frank Pallone, who has represented the 6th district since 1993 (and previously represented the 3rd district from 1988 until 1993), will seek re-election.[6] Ernesto Cullari, an orthopedic practitioner,[34] and Anna Little, the former mayor of Highlands who unsuccessfully challenged Pallone as the Republican nominee in 2010,[35] won the Republican nomination to challenge Pallone.

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared

Results

Democratic primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frank Pallone (Incumbent) 16,593 100.00
Turnout 16,593

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared

Results

Republican primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Anna Little 7,692 70.12
Republican Ernesto Cullari 3,277 29.88
Turnout 10,969

General election

Results

New Jersey's 6th Congressional District, 2014[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frank Pallone (Incumbent) 151,782 63.34
Republican Anna Little 84,360 35.20
Libertarian Len Flynn 1,392 0.58
Overthrow All Incumbents Karen Zaletel 868 0.36
Independent Mac Dara Lyden 830 0.35
Reform Hebrert Tarbous 406 0.17
Majority 67,422 28.13
Total votes 239,638
Democratic hold
External links
  • Ernesto Cullari campaign website
  • Anna Little campaign website
  • Frank Pallone campaign website

District 7

Republican Leonard Lance, who has represented the 7th district since 2009, ran for re-election.[36] The 7th district was made more favorable to Republicans in redistricting.[37] David Larsen, a businessman who unsuccessfully challenged Lance in the Republican primary in 2010, ran again.[38]

State Assemblyman Upendra J. Chivukula ran unopposed for the Democratic nomination.[39][40] At least two other candidates had announced in 2011 that they would seek the Democratic nomination, but withdraw in the months before the filing deadline: Jun Choi, the former mayor of Edison,[41] and Ed Potosnak, a chemistry teacher and entrepreneur who unsuccessfully ran for the seat in 2010.[42] Following the redistricting process which placed Choi's town of Edison in the 6th district, Choi announced that he would not be a candidate for Congress in 2012 and endorsed incumbent Frank Pallone. On January 16, 2012, Potosnak announced that he was dropping out of the race to accept a position as executive director of the New Jersey League of Conservation Voters.[43]

Patrick McKnight ran as the Libertarian candidate.[44]

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Leonard Lance, incumbent U.S. Representative
  • David Larsen, candidate for this seat in 2010

Results

Republican primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Leonard Lance (Incumbent) 23,432 60.57
Republican David Larsen 15,253 39.43
Turnout 38,685

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
Withdrew
  • Jun Choi, Former Mayor of Edison (Withdrew December 2011)
  • Ed Potosnak, chemistry teacher entrepreneur and candidate for this seat in 2010 (Withdrew January 16)

Results

Democratic primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Upendra Chivukula 11,506 100.00
Turnout 11,506

General election

Results

New Jersey's 7th Congressional District, 2012[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Leonard Lance (incumbent) 175,662 57.16
Democratic Upendra J. Chivukula 123,057 40.04
Independent Dennis A. Breen 4,518 1.47
Libertarian Patrick McKnight 4,078 1.33
Majority 52,605 17.12
Total votes 307,315
Republican hold
External links
  • Upendra Chivukula campaign website
  • Leonard Lance campaign website
  • David Larsen campaign website
  • Patrick McKnight campaign website

District 8

The new 8th district is the successor to the 13th district. Democrat Albio Sires, who has represented the 13th district since 2006, will seek re-election in this district.[45] Michael Shurin, a computer programmer, will challenge Sires in the Democratic primary.[46]

Maria Karczewski, a former commissioner of the Bayonne Local Redevelopment Authority, and Anthony Zanowic, who ran as an Independent against Sires in the 13th district in 2010, will seek the Republican nomination.[47]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Albio Sires, incumbent U.S. Representative for the 13th District
  • Michael Shurin, computer programmer

Results

Democratic primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Albio Sires (Incumbent) 30,840 89.01
Democratic Michael Shurin 3,808 10.99
Turnout 34,648

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Maria Karczewski, former Bayonne Local Redevelopment Authority commissioner
Withdrew
  • Anthony Zanowic, Independent candidate for the 13th district in 2010
  • Washington Flores

Results

Republican primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Maria Karczewski 2,981 100.00
Turnout 2,981

General election

Results

New Jersey's 8th Congressional District, 2012[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Albio Sires (Incumbent) 130,857 78.75
Republican Maria Karczewski 31,767 19.12
Politicians Are Crooks Herbert Shaw 1,841 1.11
Restoring America's Promise Stephen Deluca 1,710 1.03
Majority 99,090 59.63
Total votes 166,175
Democratic hold
External links
  • Michael Shurin campaign website

District 9

Bill Pascrell, a Democrat who has represented the 8th district since 1997, and Steve Rothman, a Democrat who has represented the 9th district since 1997, both ran for the nomination in the new 9th district.[31] Michael Wildes, the former mayor of Englewood, will not run and instead endorsed Rothman.[48] Pascrell won the Democratic primary in June.

Blase Billack, a pharmaceutical sciences associate professor at St. John's University and Shmuley Boteach, a rabbi, author, and radio talk show host, sought the Republican nomination.[49] Boteach won the Republican primary.

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
Declined

Results

Democratic primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Pascrell (Incumbent) 31,435 61.18
Democratic Steve Rothman (Incumbent) 19,947 38.82
Turnout 11,488 22.36

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared

Results

Republican primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Shmuley Boteach 5,364 57.90
Republican Hector Castillo 2,623 28.31
Republican Blase Billack 1,278 13.79
Turnout 9,265

General election

Results

New Jersey's 9th Congressional District, 2012[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Pascrell (Incumbent) 162,822 73.97
Republican Shmuley Boteach 55,091 25.03
Abundant America E. David Smith 1,138 0.52
Constitution Jeanette Woolsey 1,082 0.49
Majority 107,731 48.94
Total votes 220,133
Democratic hold
External links
  • Blase Billack campaign website
  • Shmuley Boteach campaign website
  • Bill Pascrell campaign website
  • Steve Rothman campaign website

District 10

Democrat Donald M. Payne, who had represented the 10th district since 1989, died on March 6, 2012. As a matter of convenience and cost saving, a special election will be held in conjunction with the regularly-scheduled November general election. Voters will be asked on the November ballot to select two candidates: one to serve the remainder of Payne's term in November and December, and the other candidate to serve the full 2-year term beginning in January 2013.[50]

On June 5, 2012, in the Democratic primary for the special election, Payne's son, Donald Payne Jr., defeated Ronald C. Rice (son of State Senator Ronald Rice) and Irvington Mayor Wayne Smith.[51] In the Democratic primary for the full term, held on the same day, Payne Jr. competed against Rice, Smith, State Senator Nia Gill, Cathy Wright, and Dennis Flynn.[52] He won in a landslide, garnering 60 percent of the vote. Rice received 19 percent, Gill 17 percent, and Smith, Flynn and Wright combined for about 5 percent of the vote.[53]

In the general election held on November 6, 2012, Payne Jr. defeated Republican candidate Brian Kelemen and independent Joanne Miller for the special election to fill the remainder of his father's term.[54]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
Declined

Results

Democratic primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Donald Payne Jr. 36,576 59.61
Democratic Ronald Rice 11,939 19.46
Democratic Nia Gill 10,207 16.64
Democratic Wayne Smith 1,356 2.21
Democratic Dennis Flynn 779 1.27
Democratic Cathy Wright 501 0.82
Total votes 61,358

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Brian Kelemen

Results

Republican primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Kelemen 2,095 100.00
Turnout 2,095

General election

Results

New Jersey's 10th Congressional District, 2012[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Donald Payne Jr. 201,435 87.56
Republican Brian Kelemen 24,271 10.55
Independent Joanne Miller 3,127 1.36
Libertarian Mick Erickson 1,227 0.53
Majority 230,060 77.01
Total votes
Democratic hold
External links
  • Donald Payne Jr., campaign website

District 11

Republican Rodney Frelinghuysen, who has represented the 11th district since 1995, will seek re-election. John Arvanites, a former mayor of Roseland, ran unopposed for the Democratic nomination to challenge Frelinghuysen.[55]

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared

Results

Republican primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rodney Frelinghuysen (Incumbent) 30,831 100.00
Turnout 30,831

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
  • John Arvanites, former Mayor of Roseland

Results

Democratic primary election results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Arvanites 13,387 100.00
Total votes 13,387

General election

Results

New Jersey's 11th Congressional District, 2012[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rodney Frelinghuysen (Incumbent) 182,239 58.81
Democratic John Arvanites 123,935 39.99
Independent Barry Berlin 3,725 1.20
Majority 58,304 18.81
Total votes 309,899
Republican hold
External links
  • Rodney Frelinghuysen campaign website
  • John Arvanites campaign website

District 12

Democrat Rush Holt, who has represented the 12th district since 1999, will seek re-election. Eric Beck, a businessman and former New Jersey director of the Concord Coalition, is running unopposed for the Republican nomination to challenge Holt.[56] Kenneth J. Cody who ran in this district in 2010 will run again as an independent candidate. Scott Sipprelle, a venture capitalist who unsuccessfully challenged Holt as the Republican nominee in 2010, will not run.[57]

External links
  • Rush Holt campaign website
  • Kenneth J. Cody campaign website

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "Election Information" (PDF). NJ Department of State. November 6, 2012. Retrieved March 9, 2018.
  2. ^ http://nj.gov/state/elections/2012-results/2012-official-primary-results-house-of-rep-0723.pdf
  3. ^ Blake, Aaron (April 19, 2011). "Uncertainty reigns in New Jersey redistricting". The Washington Post. Retrieved June 12, 2011.
  4. ^ a b c Trygstad, Kyle (December 23, 2011). "N.J. Map Sets Up Rothman, Garrett Member-vs.-Member Race". Roll Call. Retrieved December 24, 2011.
  5. ^ a b Barna, John (December 24, 2011). "Redrawn congressional boundaries splits East Greenwich between Andrews, LoBiondo". Gloucester County Times. Retrieved December 24, 2011.
  6. ^ a b c O'Dea, Colleen (April 4, 2012). "Primary Battles Expose Rift Among NJ Democrats". Teaneck Patch. Retrieved April 12, 2012.
  7. ^ a b c Barna, John (April 2, 2012). "Rep. LoBiondo to face primary opposition to retain House seat". Gloucester County Times. Retrieved April 12, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v NJ Division of Elections
  9. ^ Harper, Derek (November 14, 2011). "Absecon man announces challenge of LoBiondo for New Jersey House seat". The Press of Atlantic City. Retrieved November 17, 2011.
  10. ^ Pizarro, Max (January 5, 2012). "Van Drew won't oppose LoBo this year". Politicker NJ. Retrieved January 6, 2012.
  11. ^ a b Runyan Retirement Sparks Rare Open N.J. Seat : Roll Call Politics
  12. ^ a b c Levinsky, David (December 24, 2011). "New congressional map favors Runyan". phillyBurbs.com. Retrieved December 24, 2011.
  13. ^ Pizarro, Max (January 3, 2012). "Murphy won't challenge Runyan in 2012". PolitickerNJ. Retrieved January 3, 2012.
  14. ^ Isherwood, Darryl R. (January 29, 2012). "Shelley Adler set to announce bid for Congress". Politicker NJ. Retrieved January 30, 2012.
  15. ^ Piniat, Elaine (April 10, 2012). "Independent Hopes to Unseat Runyan, 'Legalize Freedom'". Brick, NJ Patch. Retrieved May 9, 2012.
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  17. ^ McGowan, Laura (May 5, 2012). "Terrence McGowan Runs for Congress". Holmdel, NJ Patch. Retrieved May 9, 2012.
  18. ^ Duffy, Erin (March 14, 2012). "Two Monmouth County Dems vie to unseat U.S. Rep. Smith in the fall". The Trenton Times. Retrieved March 23, 2012.
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  24. ^ Hayes, Melissa (January 25, 2012). "LaRouche backer joins race in 5th District". The Bergen Record. Retrieved January 31, 2012.
  25. ^ Jackson, Herb (January 30, 2012). "Passaic Freeholder Duffy in race against Garrett". NorthJersey.com. Retrieved January 31, 2012.
  26. ^ Pizarro, Max (March 12, 2012). "Duffy bows out of CD 5 bid". Politicker NJ. Retrieved March 14, 2012.
  27. ^ "Ex-NY Giant Carson says no to NJ bid for Congress". The Wall Street Journal. February 22, 2012. Retrieved February 22, 2012.
  28. ^ Pizarro, Max (February 22, 2012). "Former Bergen sheriff endorses Passaic freeholder in 5th Dist. race". Politicker NJ. Retrieved February 23, 2012.
  29. ^ Friedman, Matt (March 3, 2012). "Former News12 anchor cancels Congressional run". NJ.com. Retrieved March 3, 2012.
  30. ^ Pizarro, Max (January 27, 2012). "Wagner won't challenge Garrett in 2012". Politicker NJ. Retrieved January 27, 2012.
  31. ^ a b "Congressman Rothman announces he'll run for re-election in new Ninth District". The Jersey Journal. December 27, 2011. Retrieved December 27, 2011.
  32. ^ a b http://www.njelections.org/2012-results/2012-official-general-candidates-house-of-representatives.pdf
  33. ^ Pizarro, Max (March 8, 2012). "Former Republican, now member of Reform Party, to run against Garrett". Politicker NJ. Retrieved March 11, 2012.
  34. ^ Pizarro, Max (March 10, 2012). "Tea Partier Cullari announces CD 6 bid". Politicker NJ. Retrieved March 11, 2012.
  35. ^ "Winners and Losers: Conventions Edition". Politicker NJ. March 18, 2012. Retrieved March 19, 2012.
  36. ^ Pizarro, Max (March 13, 2012). "Lance kicks off re-election bid in CD7". Politicker NJ. Retrieved March 14, 2012.
  37. ^ Isenstadt, Alex (December 23, 2011). "New Jersey remap a lump of coal for Democrats". Politico. Retrieved December 24, 2011.
  38. ^ Pizarro, Max (January 3, 2012). "Larsen officially announces CD7 Congressional candidacy". Politicker NJ. Retrieved January 3, 2012.
  39. ^ Friedman, Matt (March 26, 2012). "N.J. assemblyman looks to unseat U.S. Rep. Leonard Lance in November". NJ.com. Retrieved March 27, 2012.
  40. ^ http://www.nj.gov/state/elections/election-results/2012-unofficial-primary-candidates-house-of-representatives-0402-930.pdf New Jersey Division of Elections web site, accessed April 3, 2012.
  41. ^ Haydon, Tom (May 5, 2011). "Former Edison Mayor Jun Choi announces bid for Congress". The Star-Ledger. Retrieved June 12, 2011.
  42. ^ "Potosnak Files 2012 Bid For US Congress". njtoday.net. May 12, 2011. Retrieved June 24, 2011.
  43. ^ Pizarro, Max (January 16, 2012). "Potosnak ends CD 7 run to take job as ED of League of Conservation Voters". Politicker NJ. Retrieved March 27, 2012.
  44. ^ McKnight, Patrick (April 16, 2012). "Libertarian Running for Congress in 7th District". Bridgewater, NJ Patch. Retrieved May 9, 2012.
  45. ^ Jackson, Herb (December 23, 2011). "Pascrell reacts to new map". The Record. Retrieved December 24, 2011.
  46. ^ McDonald, Terrence T. (April 5, 2012). "Jersey City hopeful switches parties to challenge Congressman Sires in June instead of November". The Jersey Journal. Retrieved April 12, 2012.
  47. ^ Uschak, Roman J. (April 5, 2012). "Belleville: 8th Congressional District candidates crop up". Belleville Times. Retrieved April 12, 2012.
  48. ^ Pizarro, Max (March 30, 2012). "Wildes endorses Rothman in CD 9". Politicker NJ. Retrieved March 30, 2012.
  49. ^ Ensslin, John C. (February 2, 2012). "Three Republicans file to oppose Pascrell or Rothman in 9th District". The Bergen Record. Retrieved February 3, 2012.
  50. ^ Livingston, Abby (March 30, 2012). "New Jersey: Special Election Dates For Payne Seat Set". Roll Call. Retrieved March 31, 2012.
  51. ^ "Unofficial Primary Election Results: Special Election - US House of Representatives" (PDF). New Jersey Division of Elections. Retrieved June 9, 2012.
  52. ^ Giambusso, David (May 24, 2012). "In packed 10th District congressional election, Donald Payne Jr. is viewed as front-runner". The Star-Ledger. Retrieved May 26, 2012.
  53. ^ Giambusso, David (June 5, 2012). "Donald Payne Jr. wins Democratic nomination for House seat in N.J.'s 10th District". The Star-Ledger. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
  54. ^ http://www.njelections.org/2012-results/2012-official-general-candidates-special-house.pdf
  55. ^ Frankel, Jeff (April 5, 2012). "Congress hopefuls seek votes in Bloomfield". Bloomfield Life. Retrieved April 12, 2012.
  56. ^ Pizarro, Max (January 12, 2012). "South Brunswick Republican businessman Beck to challenge Holt in CD12". Politicker NJ. Retrieved January 13, 2012.
  57. ^ Pizarro, Max (January 12, 2012). "Sipprelle won't challenge Holt this year". Politicker NJ. Retrieved January 13, 2012.

External links

  • Elections from the New Jersey Secretary of State
  • United States House of Representatives elections in New Jersey, 2012 at Ballotpedia
  • New Jersey U.S. House at OurCampaigns.com
  • Campaign contributions for U.S. Congressional races in New Jersey at OpenSecrets.org
  • Outside spending at the Sunlight Foundation
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