Ukraine national football team

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Ukraine
Україна
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) The Main Team (Головна команда)
Yellow-Blue (Жовто-Сині)
Association Football Federation of Ukraine (FFU)
Федерація Футболу України
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Andriy Shevchenko[1]
Captain Ruslan Rotan[2][3]
Most caps Anatoliy Tymoshchuk (144)
Top scorer Andriy Shevchenko (48)
Home stadium Olimpiyskiy Stadium, Kiev
FIFA code UKR
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 30 Decrease 6 (16 October 2017)
Highest 11 (February 2007)
Lowest 132 (September 1993)
Elo ranking
Current 34 (15 November 2017)
Highest 14 (November 2010)
Lowest 69 (29 March 1995)
First international
 Ukraine 1–3 Hungary 
(Uzhhorod, Ukraine; 29 April 1992)
Biggest win
 Ukraine 9–0 San Marino 
(Lviv, Ukraine; 6 September 2013)
Biggest defeat
 Croatia 4–0 Ukraine 
(Zagreb, Croatia; 25 March 1995)
 Spain 4–0 Ukraine 
(Leipzig, Germany; 14 June 2006)
 Czech Republic 4–0 Ukraine 
(Prague, Czech Republic; 6 September 2011)
World Cup
Appearances 1 (first in 2006)
Best result Quarter-finals, 2006
European Championship
Appearances 2 (first in 2012)
Best result Group stage, 2012 and 2016

The Ukraine National Football Team (Ukrainian: Збірна України з футболу) is the national football team of Ukraine and is controlled by the Football Federation of Ukraine. After Ukrainian Independence and the country's breakaway from the Soviet Union, they played their first match against Hungary on 29 April 1992. The team's biggest success on the world stage was reaching the quarter-finals in the 2006 FIFA World Cup, which also marked the team's debut in the finals of a major championship.[4] As the host nation, Ukraine automatically qualified for UEFA Euro 2012.[4] Four years later, Ukraine qualified for Euro 2016 via the play-off route, the first time qualifying for a UEFA European Championship via the qualifying process, as it finished in third place in its qualifying group. This marked the first time in Ukraine's five play-off appearances that it managed to win such a tie, previously having been unsuccessful in the play-off ties for the Euro 2000, 2002 World Cup, 2010 World Cup and 2014 World Cup.

Ukraine's home ground is the Olimpiyskiy Stadium in Kiev.[5]

History

Pre-independence (1925–1935)

Officially the national team of Ukraine, the national team was formed in the early 1990s and shortly after was recognized internationally. It is not widely known, however, that Ukraine previously had a national team in 1925–1935.[6][7] Just like the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic, the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic had its own national team.

The earliest record of games it played can be traced back to August 1928. A championship among the national teams of the Soviet republics as well as the Moscow city team was planned to take place in Moscow. Just before the tournament started, the Ukraine national team played two exhibition games against the Red Sports Federation team from Uruguay, one in Kharkiv (lost 1–2) and the other in Moscow (won 3–2). At the All-Soviet tournament, Ukraine played three games and reached the final where it lost to Moscow 0–1. Along the way, Ukraine managed to defeat the national teams of Belarus and Transcaucasus.

In 1929, Ukraine beat the team of Lower Austria in an exhibition match in Kharkiv, recording a score of 4–1.

In 1931, Ukraine participated in another All-Soviet championship in Moscow. It played only one game, starting from the semifinals. Ukraine lost to the national team of Transcaucasus 0–3 and was eliminated.

In 1986, Ukraine became a winner of association football tournament of the Spartakiad of Peoples of the USSR that was hosted in Ukraine when in final it beat the team of Uzbekistan (Uzbek SSR).

Official formation

Prior to Independence in 1991, Ukrainian players represented the Soviet Union national team. After independence, a Ukraine national team was formed but the Football Federation of Ukraine failed to secure recognition in time to compete in the 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification.[8] Meanwhile, some of the best Ukrainian players of the beginning of the 1990s (including Andrei Kanchelskis, Viktor Onopko, Sergei Yuran, Yuri Nikiforov, Ilya Tsymbalar and Oleg Salenko) chose to play for Russia, as it was named the official successor of the Soviet Union.

The Soviet Union's five-year UEFA coefficients, despite being earned in part by Ukrainian players (for example, in the final of the last successful event, Euro 1988, 7 out of starting 11 players were Ukrainians[9]), were transferred to the direct descendant of the Soviet national team – the Russia national team. As a result, a crisis was created for both the national team and the domestic league. When Ukraine returned to international football in late 1994, it did so as absolute beginners.[8]

In the following years, the Ukrainian team improved, showcasing talents like Andriy Shevchenko, Anatoliy Tymoshchuk, Serhiy Rebrov and Oleksandr Shovkovskiy. Ukraine, however, failed to qualify for any major tournaments prior to 2006.

First official games

Soon after being accepted to FIFA and UEFA as a full member in 1992, Ukraine started its preparation for its first game. At first the head coach of the team was planned to be Valeriy Lobanovskyi, but at that time he had a current contract with the United Arab Emirates. Thus, the first manager of the team had to be chosen among members of a coaching council which consisted of Anatoliy Puzach (manager of Dynamo Kyiv), Yevhen Kucherevskyi (FC Dnipro), Yevhen Lemeshko (Torpedo Zaporizhya), Yukhym Shkolnykov (Bokovyna Chernnivtsi) and Viktor Prokopenko (Chornomorets Odesa). Later, they were joined by a native of Donetsk Valeriy Yaremchenko (Shakhtar Donetsk). At the end a circle of candidates narrowed down only to three names: Puzach, Yaremnchenko and Prokopenko, the latter who eventually became the head coach.

The first game of the team it was agreed to play against Hungary on 22 April 1992 in Kiev at the Respublikansky Stadium. Due to financial issues, however, it was rearranged to 29 April and moved to the border with Hungary in Uzhhorod at the Avanhard Stadium. There was almost no preparation to the game as all "pioneers" gathered in Kiev on 27 April and the next day flew out to Uzhhorod. At the same time, the opponent, while failing to qualify for the Euro 1992, was preparing for 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification. Ukraine at that time failed to be accepted for the qualification cycle.

Unlike the Hungarian squad, players of which played alongside before and were coached by the European Cup-winning coach Emerich Jenei, the Ukrainian team lost some its better and experienced players to the CIS national football team that was playing its own friendly against the England national football team in Moscow.[10] Among those were Andrei Kanchelskis, Volodymyr Lyutyi, Sergei Yuran, Viktor Onopko, Oleksiy Mykhaylychenko and Akhrik Tsveiba (the last two would later represent Ukraine). For the game against Hungary, only Ivan Hetsko and Oleh Luzhny had previous experience of playing at international level; other players had only played for the Soviet Olympic football team, while Serhiy Kovalets played for Ukraine at the Spartakiad of People of the USSR in 1986.

The first home game was lost 1:3 with Ivan Hetsko becoming the first goalscorer in the history of national team. During the summer of 1992 the Prokopenko's team played two more away games on 27 June against the United States (0:0) and on 26 August against Hungary (1:2). After the second loss to Hungary Prokopenko resigned.

2006 FIFA World Cup

After an unsuccessful Euro 2004 qualifying campaign, Ukraine appointed Oleh Blokhin as the national team's head coach. Despite initial skepticism about his appointment due to his previous somewhat undistinguished coaching record and general public calls for a foreign coach, Ukraine went on to qualify for their first-ever FIFA World Cup on 3 September 2005 after drawing 1–1 against Georgia in Tbilisi. In their first World Cup, in 2006, they were in the Group H together with Spain, Tunisia and Saudi Arabia. After losing 0–4 in the first match against Spain, the Ukrainians beat their other two opponents to reach the knock-out stage.

In the round of 16, Ukraine played against the winner of the Group G Switzerland, who they beat on penalties. In the quarter-finals, they were beaten 0–3 by eventual champions Italy.

UEFA Euro 2012

Ukraine national football team in 2012

As co-hosts, Ukraine qualified automatically for Euro 2012,[4] marking their debut in the UEFA European Championship. In their opening game against Sweden, Ukraine won 2–1 in Kiev. Despite the team's efforts, however, Ukraine was eliminated after a 0–2 loss to France and a 0–1 loss to England, both in Donetsk.

2014 World Cup qualification – UEFA Group H

Team
Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 England 10 6 4 0 31 4 +27 22
 Ukraine 10 6 3 1 28 4 +24 21
 Montenegro 10 4 3 3 18 17 +1 15
 Poland 10 3 4 3 18 12 +6 13
 Moldova 10 3 2 5 12 17 −5 11
 San Marino 10 0 0 10 1 54 −53 0
  England Moldova Montenegro Poland San Marino Ukraine
England  4–0 4–1 2–0 5–0 1–1
Moldova  0–5 0–1 1–1 3–0 0–0
Montenegro  1–1 2–5 2–2 3–0 0–4
Poland  1–1 2–0 1–1 5–0 1–3
San Marino  0–8 0–2 0–6 1–5 0–8
Ukraine  0–0 2–1 0–1 1–0 9–0


Euro 2016

Ukraine national football team in 2015

For the Euro 2016 qualifying round, Ukraine were drawn against Spain, Slovakia, Belarus, Macedonia and Luxembourg. The Zbirna was expected to qualify for the tournament as runners-up of the group behind Spain but, despite having won all of their games against Belarus, F.Y.R.Macedonia and Luxembourg, the Ukrainians finished third due to a lack of finishing during the top matches against Spain and Slovakia. They therefore had to face Slovenia in the play-off route and succeeded in taking revenge over the team which eliminated Ukraine at the same stage in 1999. They recorded a 2–0 win at Lviv before catching the 1–1 draw at the very end of the second game.

Ukraine won convincingly all of their preparation friendlies against Cyprus, Wales, Romania and Albania. At club level, FC Dnipro had recently reached the UEFA Europa League final in 2015, while Shakhtar Donetsk had progressed to the semi-finals one year later, as the Ukrainian clubs succeeded in sending one participant to the round of 16 of the UEFA Champions League two times in a row. Having been drawn against world champions Germany, Slavic neighbors Poland and first-time Euro competitors Northern Ireland, the Ukrainian team was expected to advance at least to the next round.

The tournament, however, turned into a surprising nightmare. Ukraine lost all of their three games, becoming the only participant in such a case and the first team to exit the tournament, also failing to score a single goal. The Ukrainians started against Germany and were beaten despite good resistance and great chances during an entertaining first half. They came close to levelling the score but were unable to deliver the final end product and were hit by Germany on the counterattack at the very end of the game. Despite a 2–0 loss, it appeared that they would prove to be a stubborn opposition for their opponents. This game was followed by a dreadful and disastrous second 2–0 loss against Northern Ireland with a new goal conceded at the very end of the encounter. The Ukrainian media mainly criticized the coach Mykhaylo Fomenko's perceived inadequate psychological preparation of the squad as much as predictable tactics which were judged as easy to break down. Ukrainians stars Andriy Yarmolenko and Yevhen Konoplyanka's underperformance was also mentioned. Ukraine were the first team eliminated of the competition at this point and lost 1–0 their last game to Poland in which they suffered of an important lack of finishing and a poor performance from striker Roman Zozulya.

2018 FIFA World Cup qualification – UEFA Group I

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Iceland 10 7 1 2 16 7 +9 22 Qualification to 2018 FIFA World Cup 1–0 2–0 2–0 3–2 2–0
2  Croatia 10 6 2 2 15 4 +11 20 Advance to second round 2–0 1–0 1–1 1–1 1–0
3  Ukraine 10 5 2 3 13 9 +4 17 1–1 0–2 2–0 1–0 3–0
4  Turkey 10 4 3 3 14 13 +1 15 0–3 1–0 2–2 2–0 2–0
5  Finland 10 2 3 5 9 13 −4 9 1–0 0–1 1–2 2–2 1–1
6  Kosovo 10 0 1 9 3 24 −21 1 1–2 0–6 0–2 1–4 0–1
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Qualification tiebreakers

Stadiums

The most important matches of the Ukrainian national team are held in Kiev's Olimpiyskiy National Sports Complex, also home of Dynamo Kyiv. New infrastructure and stadiums were built in preparation for Euro 2012, and other venues include stadiums in the cities of Donetsk, Kharkiv, Lviv, Dnipro, Odesa. The alternative stadiums are: Donbass Arena (Donetsk), Metalist Stadium (Kharkiv), Arena Lviv (Lviv), Dnipro-Arena (Dnipro), Chornomorets Stadium (Odesa).

During the Soviet time era (before 1991), only two stadiums in Ukraine were used in official games, the Olimpiysky NSC in Kiev (known then as Republican Stadium) and the Lokomotiv Stadium in Simferopol.

Recent and forthcoming matches

The following matches were played or are scheduled to be played by the national team in the current or upcoming seasons.


Player records

Most capped Ukraine players

Anatoliy Tymoshchuk and Andriy Shevchenko being honored by UEFA in 2011 for their 100th cap. They are the first and second, respectively, most capped players in the history of Ukraine.
Andriy Shevchenko is the top scorer in the history of Ukraine with 48 goals.

As of 10 November 2017
Players in bold are still active, at least at club level.

# Name Career Caps Goals
1 Anatoliy Tymoshchuk 2000–2016 144 4
2 Andriy Shevchenko 1995–2012 111 48
3 Oleh Husyev 2003–2016 98 13
Ruslan Rotan 2003– 98 8
5 Oleksandr Shovkovskyi 1994–2012 92 0
6 Andriy Pyatov 2007– 78 0
7 Serhiy Rebrov 1992–2006 75 15
8 Andriy Yarmolenko 2009– 74 33
Andriy Voronin 2002–2012 74 8
10 Andriy Husin 1993–2006 71 9

Top Ukraine goalscorers

As of 10 November 2017

# Player Career Goals Caps Average
1 Andriy Shevchenko 1995–2012 48 111 0.43
2 Andriy Yarmolenko 2009– 33 74 0.45
3 Yevhen Konoplyanka 2010– 15 67 0.22
Serhiy Rebrov 1992–2006 15 75 0.2
5 Oleh Husyev 2003–2016 13 98 0.13
6 Serhiy Nazarenko 2003–2012 12 56 0.21
7 Yevhen Seleznyov 2008– 11 54 0.2
8 Andriy Vorobey 2000–2008 9 68 0.13
Andriy Husin 1993–2006 9 71 0.13
10 Tymerlan Huseynov 1993–1997 8 14 0.57
Artem Milevskyi 2006–2012 8 50 0.16
Andriy Voronin 2002–2012 8 74 0.11
Ruslan Rotan 2003– 8 98 0.08

Ukraine captains

As of 10 November 2017[11]

# Player Career Captain Caps Total Caps
1 Andriy Shevchenko 1995–2012 58 111
2 Anatoliy Tymoshchuk 2000–2016 41 144
3 Oleh Luzhnyi 1992–2003 39 52
4 Ruslan Rotan 2003– 23 98
5 Yuriy Kalitvintsev 1995–1999 13 22
Oleksandr Holovko 1995–2004 13 58
7 Oleksandr Shovkovskyi 1994–2012 12 92
8 Oleksandr Kucher 2006– 7 56
9 Hennadiy Lytovchenko 1993–1994 4 4
Yuriy Maksymov 1992–2002 4 27
Vyacheslav Shevchuk 2006–2016 4 56

Top 10 goalkeepers

As of 10 November 2017

# Player Career Games Wins GA GAA
1 Oleksandr Shovkovskyi 1994–2012 92 38 80 0.87
2 Andriy Pyatov 2007– 78 39 61 0.782
3 Oleh Suslov 1994–1997 12 7 15 1.25
4 Vitaliy Reva 2001–2003 9 3 10 1.111
5 Andriy Dykan 2010–2012 8 5 11 1.375
Maksym Levytskyi 2000–2002 8 1 10 1.25
7 Dmytro Tyapushkin 1994–1995 7 1 11 1.571
8 Valeriy Vorobyov 1994–1999 6 3 2 0.333
9 Denys Boyko 2014– 5 3 2 0.4
Dmytro Shutkov 1993–2003 5 2 4 0.8
Vyacheslav Kernozenko 2000–2008 5 2 8 1.6

Ukraine managers

Last updated on 10 November 2017.

Manager Nation Ukraine career Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA Win % Qualifying cycle Final tour
Viktor Prokopenko Ukraine 1992 3 0 1 2 2 5 0
Mykola Pavlov (caretaker) Ukraine 1992 1 0 1 0 1 1 0
Oleh Bazylevych Ukraine 1993–1994 11 4 3 4 13 14 36.36 1996
Mykola Pavlov (caretaker) Ukraine 1994 2 0 0 2 0 3 0
Yozhef Sabo Ukraine 1994 2 1 1 0 3 0 50 1996
Anatoliy Konkov Ukraine 1995 7 3 0 4 8 13 42.86 1996
Yozhef Sabo Ukraine 1996–1999 32 15 11 6 26 41 46.88 1998, 2000
Valeriy Lobanovskyi Ukraine 2000–2001 18 6 7 5 29 14 33.33 2002
Leonid Buryak Ukraine 2002–2003 19 5 6 8 38 13 26.32 2004
Oleh Blokhin Ukraine 2003–2007 46 21 14 11 78 26 45.65 2006, 2008 2006
Oleksiy Mykhaylychenko Ukraine 2008–2009 21 12 5 4 41 12 57.14 2010
Myron Markevych[12] Ukraine 2010 4 3 1 0 9 3 75
Yuriy Kalytvyntsev (caretaker)[13] Ukraine 2010–2011 8 1 5 2 14 16 12.5
Oleh Blokhin[14] Ukraine 2011–2012 18 7 3 8 28 12 38.89 2012,[15] 2014 2012
Andriy Bal (caretaker)[16] Ukraine 2012 2 0 1 1 2 1 0 2014
Oleksandr Zavarov (caretaker) Ukraine 2012 1 1 0 0 1 0 100
Mykhaylo Fomenko[17] Ukraine 2012–2016 37 24 6 7 67 22 64.86 2014, 2016 2016
Andriy Shevchenko Ukraine 2016– 12 7 2 3 17 10 58.33 2018

Coaching staff

Currently approved:[18]

Head coach Ukraine Andriy Shevchenko
Coach Italy Mauro Tassotti
Coach Spain Raúl Riancho
Coach Italy Andrea Maldera
Observer Ukraine Andriy Voronin
Observer Ukraine Volodymyr Onyshchenko
Goalkeeping coach Spain Pedro Luis Jaro
Fitness coach Ukraine Ivan Bashtovyi

Players

Current squad

The following players have been called up for the friendly match against Slovakia on 10 November 2017.[19][20][21]
Players' records are accurate as of 10 November 2017 after the match against Slovakia.[22][23]

0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
12 1GK Andriy Pyatov (1984-06-28) 28 June 1984 (age 33) 78 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
35 1GK Maksym Koval (1992-12-09) 9 December 1992 (age 24) 2 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv

5 2DF Oleksandr Kucher (1982-10-22) 22 October 1982 (age 35) 56 2 Turkey Kayserispor
3 2DF Yevhen Khacheridi (1987-07-28) 28 July 1987 (age 30) 50 3 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv
2 2DF Bohdan Butko (1991-01-13) 13 January 1991 (age 26) 28 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
18 2DF Ivan Ordets (1992-07-08) 8 July 1992 (age 25) 9 1 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
20 2DF Oleksandr Karavayev (1992-06-02) 2 June 1992 (age 25) 8 0 Ukraine Zorya Luhansk
22 2DF Eduard Sobol (1995-04-20) 20 April 1995 (age 22) 6 0 Czech Republic Slavia Prague
4 2DF Mykola Matviyenko (1996-05-02) 2 May 1996 (age 21) 6 0 Ukraine Vorskla Poltava
15 2DF Artem Shabanov (1992-03-07) 7 March 1992 (age 25) 1 0 Ukraine Olimpik Donetsk
39 2DF Oleksandr Svatok (1994-09-27) 27 September 1994 (age 23) 0 0 Ukraine Zorya Luhansk

14 3MF Ruslan Rotan (Captain) (1981-10-29) 29 October 1981 (age 36) 98 8 Czech Republic Slavia Prague
7 3MF Andriy Yarmolenko (1989-10-23) 23 October 1989 (age 28) 74 33 Germany Borussia Dortmund
10 3MF Yevhen Konoplyanka (1989-09-29) 29 September 1989 (age 28) 67 15 Germany Schalke 04
8 3MF Ruslan Malinovskyi (1993-05-04) 4 May 1993 (age 24) 7 0 Belgium Genk
19 3MF Yevhen Shakhov (1990-11-30) 30 November 1990 (age 26) 4 1 Greece PAOK
11 3MF Marlos (1988-06-07) 7 June 1988 (age 29) 3 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk
33 3MF Serhiy Myakushko (1993-04-15) 15 April 1993 (age 24) 1 0 Ukraine Karpaty Lviv
27 3MF Oleksandr Andriyevskyi (1994-06-25) 25 June 1994 (age 23) 1 0 Ukraine Zorya Luhansk
24 3MF Vyacheslav Tankovskyi (1995-08-16) 16 August 1995 (age 22) 0 0 Ukraine Mariupol

26 4FW Yuriy Kolomoyets (1990-03-22) 22 March 1990 (age 27) 1 0 Ukraine Vorskla Poltava

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up for the team within the last 12 months.[24][25][26][27]

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Andriy Lunin U21 (1999-02-11) 11 February 1999 (age 18) 0 0 Ukraine Zorya Luhansk v.  Croatia, 9 October 2017
GK Mykyta Shevchenko (1993-01-26) 26 January 1993 (age 24) 0 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk v.  Finland, 11 June 2017
GK Denys Boyko (1988-01-29) 29 January 1988 (age 29) 5 0 Turkey Beşiktaş v.  Croatia, 24 March 2017
GK Artur Rudko (1992-05-07) 7 May 1992 (age 25) 0 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv v.  Croatia, 24 March 2017 PRE
GK Oleksiy Shevchenko (1992-02-24) 24 February 1992 (age 25) 0 0 Ukraine Zorya Luhansk v.  Croatia, 24 March 2017 PRE

DF Yaroslav Rakitskiy INJ (1989-08-03) 3 August 1989 (age 28) 47 4 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk v.  Slovakia, 10 November 2017 WD
DF Ihor Perduta (1990-11-15) 15 November 1990 (age 27) 0 0 Ukraine Vorskla Poltava v.  Croatia, 9 October 2017
DF Pavlo Lukyanchuk U21 (1996-05-19) 19 May 1996 (age 21) 0 0 Ukraine Olimpik Donetsk v.  Kosovo, 6 October 2017
DF Mykola Morozyuk (1988-01-17) 17 January 1988 (age 29) 13 1 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv v.  Kosovo, 6 October 2017 PRE
DF Serhiy Kryvtsov INJ (1991-03-15) 15 March 1991 (age 26) 3 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk v.  Iceland, 5 September 2017
DF Artem Fedetskyi (1985-04-26) 26 April 1985 (age 32) 53 2 Ukraine Karpaty Lviv v.  Croatia, 24 March 2017 PRE
DF Mykyta Burda INJ (1995-04-24) 24 April 1995 (age 22) 0 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv v.  Croatia, 24 March 2017 PRE

MF Taras Stepanenko INJ (1989-08-08) 8 August 1989 (age 28) 42 3 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk v.  Slovakia, 10 November 2017 WD
MF Denys Harmash INJ (1990-04-19) 19 April 1990 (age 27) 30 2 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv v.  Slovakia, 10 November 2017 WD
MF Vitaliy Buyalskyi INJ (1993-01-06) 6 January 1993 (age 24) 1 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv v.  Slovakia, 10 November 2017 WD
MF Serhiy Sydorchuk INJ (1991-05-02) 2 May 1991 (age 26) 20 2 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv v.  Croatia, 9 October 2017
MF Viktor Kovalenko U21 (1996-02-14) 14 February 1996 (age 21) 15 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk v.  Croatia, 9 October 2017
MF Oleksandr Zinchenko U21 (1996-12-15) 15 December 1996 (age 20) 13 1 England Manchester City v.  Croatia, 9 October 2017
MF Volodymyr Shepelyev U21 (1997-06-01) 1 June 1997 (age 20) 2 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv v.  Croatia, 9 October 2017
MF Viktor Tsyhankov INJ (1997-11-15) 15 November 1997 (age 20) 2 0 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv v.  Kosovo, 6 October 2017 WD
MF Vladlen Yurchenko (1994-01-22) 22 January 1994 (age 23) 0 0 Germany Bayer Leverkusen v.  Iceland, 5 September 2017
MF Maksym Malyshev INJ (1992-12-24) 24 December 1992 (age 24) 2 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk v.  Finland, 11 June 2017
MF Ivan Petryak (1994-03-13) 13 March 1994 (age 23) 3 0 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk v.  Finland, 11 June 2017 WD

FW Artem Kravets INJ (1989-06-03) 3 June 1989 (age 28) 20 7 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv v.  Slovakia, 10 November 2017 WD
FW Artem Besyedin U21 (1996-03-31) 31 March 1996 (age 21) 6 1 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv v.  Slovakia, 10 November 2017 WD
FW Yevhen Seleznyov (1985-07-20) 20 July 1985 (age 32) 54 11 Turkey Kardemir Karabükspor v.  Finland, 11 June 2017
FW Artem Dovbyk (1997-06-21) 21 June 1997 (age 20) 0 0 Ukraine Dnipro v.  Finland, 11 June 2017 PRE
FW Roman Zozulya RET (1989-11-17) 17 November 1989 (age 28) 33 4 Spain Albacete v.  Croatia, 24 March 2017 PRE
FW Andriy Boryachuk U21 (1996-04-23) 23 April 1996 (age 21) 0 0 Ukraine Mariupol v.  Croatia, 24 March 2017 PRE
FW Roman Yaremchuk (1995-11-27) 27 November 1995 (age 21) 0 0 Belgium Gent v.  Croatia, 24 March 2017 PRE

Notes:

  • INJ = Not part of the current squad due to injury.
  • WD = Withdrew because of injury.
  • PRE = Preliminary squad.
  • RET = Retired from the national team.
  • SUS Suspended for the next match.
  • U21 = Joined the Ukraine national under-21 team instead.

Previous squads

Competitive record

FIFA World Cup record

FIFA World Cup FIFA World Cup Qualification
Year Round Position Pld W D * L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
1930–1990 Part of  Soviet Union
United States 1994 Did Not Enter (spot not granted by FIFA) Did Not Enter (spot not granted by FIFA)
France 1998 Did Not Qualify 12 6 3 3 11 9
South Korea Japan 2002 12 4 6 2 15 13
Germany 2006 Quarter-Finals 8th 5 2 1 2 5 7 12 7 4 1 18 7
South Africa 2010 Did Not Qualify 12 6 4 2 21 7
Brazil 2014 12 7 3 2 30 7
Russia 2018 10 5 2 3 13 9
Qatar 2022 To Be Determined
Total Quarter-final 1/8 5 2 1 2 5 7 69 35 22 12 108 50
* Denotes draws include knock-out matches decided on penalty kicks.

UEFA European Championship record

UEFA European Championship UEFA European Championship Qualification
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
1960–1992 Part of  Soviet Union Part of  Soviet Union
England 1996 Did Not Qualify 10 4 1 5 11 15
Belgium Netherlands 2000 12 5 6 1 16 7
Portugal 2004 8 2 4 2 11 10
Austria Switzerland 2008 12 5 2 5 18 16
Poland Ukraine 2012 Group Stage 13th 3 1 0 2 2 4 Qualified as host nation
France 2016 Group Stage 24th 3 0 0 3 0 5 12 7 2 3 17 5
European Union 2020 To Be Determined
Total Group Stage 2/7 6 1 0 5 2 9 54 23 15 16 73 53

Qualifying campaigns

FIFA World Cup UEFA European Championship
1994 – Qualifying spot not granted by FIFA 1996 – 4th in Qualifying group 4
1998 – 2nd in Qualifying group 9, lost to Croatia in play-off 2000 – 2nd in Qualifying group 4, lost to Slovenia in play-off
2002 – 2nd in Qualifying group 5, lost to Germany in play-off 2004 – 3rd in Qualifying group 6
2006 – Qualified for the tournament (1st in Qualifying group 2) 2008 – 4th in Qualifying group B
2010 – 2nd in Qualifying group 6, lost to Greece in play-off 2012 – Qualified for the tournament (as a host nation)
2014 – 2nd in Qualifying group H, lost to France in play-off 2016 – Qualified for the tournament (3rd in Qualifying group C, won over Slovenia in play-off)
2018 – 3rd in Qualifying group I

All-time team record

World Map of Ukraine's opponents (2014)

The following table shows Ukraine's all-time international record, correct as of 10 November 2017.[28]

Against Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA GD
 Albania 5 4 1 0 9 3 +6
 Andorra 4 4 0 0 17 0 +17
 Armenia 8 5 3 0 17 8 +9
 Austria 2 1 0 1 4 4 0
 Azerbaijan 2 1 1 0 6 0 +6
 Belarus 9 5 3 1 12 5 +7
 Bulgaria 5 3 2 0 7 2 +5
 Brazil 1 0 0 1 0 2 −2
 Cameroon 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
 Canada 1 0 1 0 2 2 0
 Chile 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1
 Costa Rica 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4
 Croatia 9 1 3 5 5 15 −10
 Cyprus 3 1 1 1 5 5 0
 Czech Republic 2 0 1 1 0 4 −4
 Denmark 3 1 1 1 2 2 0
 England 7 1 2 4 3 9 −6
 Estonia 4 4 0 0 10 0 +10
 Finland 2 2 0 0 3 1 +2
 France 9 1 3 5 5 14 −9
 Faroe Islands 2 2 0 0 7 0 +7
 Georgia 9 6 3 0 16 6 +10
 Germany 6 0 3 3 5 12 −7
 Greece 6 2 2 2 4 3 +1
 Hungary 2 0 0 2 2 5 −3
 Iran 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1
 Iceland 4 1 2 1 3 4 –1
 Israel 6 2 2 2 7 5 +2
 Italy 7 0 1 6 2 14 −12
 Japan 2 1 0 1 1 1 0
 Kazakhstan 4 4 0 0 9 3 +6
 South Korea 2 0 0 2 0 3 −3
 Kosovo 2 2 0 0 5 0 +5
 Latvia 3 2 1 0 3 1 +2
 Lithuania 8 5 1 2 15 8 +7
 Libya 2 1 1 0 4 1 +3
 Luxembourg 3 3 0 0 9 0 +9
 Macedonia 4 2 1 1 3 1 +2
 Mexico 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1
 Moldova 5 3 2 0 6 3 +3
 Montenegro 2 1 0 1 4 1 +3
 Netherlands 2 0 1 1 1 4 −3
 Niger 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1
 Northern Ireland 5 2 2 1 3 3 0
 Norway 5 4 1 0 5 0 +5
 Poland 8 3 2 3 9 9 0
 Portugal 2 1 0 1 2 2 0
 Romania 6 2 1 3 10 14 −4
 Russia 2 1 1 0 4 3 +1
 San Marino 2 2 0 0 17 0 +17
 Saudi Arabia 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4
 Scotland 2 1 0 1 3 3 0
 Serbia 5 5 0 0 9 1 +8
 Slovakia 6 2 3 1 7 6 +1
 Slovenia 6 1 3 2 7 7 0
 Spain 5 0 1 4 3 10 −7
  Switzerland 2 1 1 0 2 2 0
 Sweden 4 2 1 1 4 3 +1
 Tunisia 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1
 Turkey 8 2 2 4 9 11 −2
 United Arab Emirates 1 0 1 0 1 1 0
 United States 4 3 1 0 5 1 +4
 Uruguay 1 0 0 1 2 3 −1
 Uzbekistan 2 2 0 0 4 1 +3
 Wales 4 2 2 0 3 1 +2
Total 230 110 59 62 325 219 +106

Home venues record

Since Ukraine's first fixture (29 April 1992 vs. Hungary) they have played their home games at 11 different stadiums.

Venue City Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA Points per game
Olimpiysky National Sports Complex Kiev 57 27 19 11 82 47 1.75
Lobanovsky Dynamo Stadium Kiev 20 13 5 2 38 15 2.2
Arena Lviv Lviv 9 7 2 0 23 4 2.56
Metalist Stadium Kharkiv 9 4 1 4 13 8 1.44
Ukraina Stadium Lviv 6 6 0 0 14 5 3
Chornomorets Stadium Odesa 5 4 1 0 6 2 2.6
Donbass Arena Donetsk 5 0 1 4 2 9 0.2
Dnipro Stadium Dnipro 2 2 0 0 2 0 3
Shakhtar Stadium Donetsk 2 0 1 1 0 2 0.5
Meteor Stadium Dnipro 1 0 1 0 2 2 1
Avanhard Stadium Uzhhorod 1 0 0 1 1 3 0
Totals 117 63 31 23 183 97 1.88
Last updated: 10 November 2017. Statistics include official FIFA-recognised matches only.

FIFA Ranking history

[29]

1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
90 77 71 59 49 47 27 34 45 45 60 57 40 13 30 15 22 34 55 47 18 25 30

Sports kits and sponsors

Kit history and evolution

On 29 March 2010, Ukraine debuted a new Adidas kit.[30] This replaced the Adidas kit with a yellow base and the traditional Adidas three stripe with a snake sash which was used in 2009.[31] Prior to 5 February 2009 Ukraine wore a Lotto kit. On 2009 the official team kit is produced by German company Adidas which has a contract with the Ukrainian team until 31 December 2016.

Former crest.
Period Kit provider
1992–1996 United Kingdom Umbro
1997–2002 Germany Puma
2002–2008 Italy Lotto
2009 – 2016 Germany Adidas
2017– present Spain Joma

Home

2004
2006
2008
2009
2010
2012
2014
2016
2017

Away

2004
2006
2008
2009
2010
2012
2014
2016
2017

Sponsors

Marketing for the Football Federation of Ukraine is conducted by the Ukraine Football International (UFI).

Former title and general sponsors included Ukrtelekom and Kyivstar.[35]

See also

Notes

References

  1. ^ источники, Внешние. "Шевченко - главный тренер сборной Украины". 
  2. ^ FIFA.com. "2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™ - Matches - Croatia-Ukraine - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. 
  3. ^ uefa.com. "FIFA World Cup 2018 - Croatia-Ukraine – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. 
  4. ^ a b c uefa.com. "Member associations - Ukraine - Profile – UEFA.com". UEFA.com. 
  5. ^ NSK Olimpiysky, Ukrainian Soccer Portal
  6. ^ The Ukrainian Football National Team of 1925–1935 (in Ukrainian)
  7. ^ Ukrainian Soccer History website (in Ukrainian)
  8. ^ a b Ukraine’s forgotten World Cup pedigree, Business Ukraine (4 August 2010)
  9. ^ "RSSSF European Championship 1988 – Final Tournament – Full Details". Rsssf.com. Retrieved 2011-12-07. 
  10. ^ 1992 season of the Russian national football tean. Rusteam.permian.ru
  11. ^ Вербицький, Іван. "Шевчук – 25-й у історії збірної України капітан". 
  12. ^ "Copy of the document for the resgnation". Retrieved 2011-12-07. 
  13. ^ "Збірну довірили Калитвинцеву (National team was entrusted to Kalitvintsev)". www.ffu.org.ua (in Ukrainian). 25 August 2010. 
  14. ^ Ukraine appoint Blokhin, Sky Sports (21 April 2011)
  15. ^ Friendlies
  16. ^ Андрій Баль призначений в.о. головного тренера збірної України (Andriy Bal is appointed acting head coach of the Ukrainian national team), www.ua-football.com (6 October 2012)
  17. ^ Ukraine's football federation taps Fomenko to coach national team, Kyiv Post (26 December 2012)
  18. ^ "Football Federation of Ukraine's official website". ffu.org.ua. 
  19. ^ http://ffu.org.ua/eng/teams/teams_main/17081/
  20. ^ http://ffu.org.ua/ukr/teams/teams_main/17128/
  21. ^ http://ffu.org.ua/ukr/teams/teams_main/17136/
  22. ^ Strack-Zimmermann, Benjamin. "Ukraine (2017)". www.national-football-teams.com. 
  23. ^ "Ukraine - Record International Players". www.rsssf.com. 
  24. ^ "Football Federation of Ukraine's official website". ffu.org.ua. 
  25. ^ "Football Federation of Ukraine's official website". ffu.org.ua. 
  26. ^ "Football Federation of Ukraine's official website". ffu.org.ua. 
  27. ^ http://ffu.org.ua/eng/teams/teams_main/16928/
  28. ^ "All matches". ffu.org.ua. Retrieved 8 October 2010. 
  29. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking - Associations - Ukraine - Men's". FIFA.com. September 14, 2017. 
  30. ^ "Новую форму сборной первым примерил Ракицкий (+фото) (New uniform for the National team was first fitted by Rakytsky with photo)". ua.football (in Russian). Globalinfo (Kyiv, Ukraine). 29 March 2010. 
  31. ^ "Ukraine 09/10 Adidas football kits". footballshirtculture. 6 February 2009. Retrieved 11 June 2009. 
  32. ^ "Спонсор збірної України пообіцяв $2 млн. за вихід на ЧС-2014 - Факти". 22 January 2013. 
  33. ^ "Article-news at epicentrk.com.ua". 
  34. ^ Presentation of new sponsors in 2013 on YouTube. Youtube channel of FFU.
  35. ^ источники, Внешние. "Спонсори збірної України, їх статуси і класифікація". 

External links

  • Ukraine at the Euro 2016. FFU special website.
  • Ukrainian page on FIFA's website (include upcoming fixtures)
  • Official website of the Ukrainian Football Federation
  • Ukrainian Football
  • Soccerway.com
  • www.allplayers.in.ua
  • Ukrainian Soccer History website (in Ukrainian)
  • RSSSF archive of most capped players and highest goalscorers
  • Media library (forum-style) of Ukrainian National Football Team
  • ELO ratings
  • List of Ukrainian international players perished in car crashes
  • Ukraine Football International website
  • Complete List of Teams and Results
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