Tunisia national football team

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tunisia
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) The Eagles of Carthage
( نسور قرطاج )
Association Tunisian Football Federation
Confederation CAF (Africa)
Sub-confederation UNAF (North Africa)
Head coach Nabil Maâloul
Captain Aymen Mathlouthi
Most caps Radhi Jaïdi (105)
Top scorer Issam Jemâa (36)
Home stadium Stade Olympique de Radès
FIFA code TUN
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 31 Increase 3 (14 Septemebr 2017)
Highest 19 (February 1998)
Lowest 65 (July 2010)
Elo ranking
Current 68 Steady (7 May 2017)
Highest 24 (June 1978)
Lowest 103 (July 1988)
First international
 Tunisia 1–2 Algeria 
(Tunisia; 25 June 1957)
Biggest win
 Tunisia 7–0 Togo 
(Tunis, Tunisia; 7 January 2000)
 Tunisia 7–0 Malawi 
(Tunis, Tunisia; 26 March 2005)
 Tunisia 8–1 Djibouti 
(Radès, Tunisia; 12 June 2015)
Biggest defeat
 Hungary 10–1 Tunisia Tunisia
(Hungary; 24 July 1960)
World Cup
Appearances 4 (first in 1978)
Best result Group stage, 1978, 1998, 2002 and 2006
Africa Cup of Nations
Appearances 18 (first in 1962)
Best result Champions 2004
African Nations Championship
Appearances 2 (first in 2011)
Best result Champions 2011
Confederations Cup
Appearances 1 (first in 2005)
Best result Group stage, 2005

The Tunisia national football team (Arabic: منتخب تونس لكرة القدم‎‎), nicknamed Les Aigles de Carthage (The Eagles of Carthage or The Carthage Eagles), is the national team of Tunisia and is controlled by the Tunisian Football Federation. They have qualified for four FIFA World Cups, the first one in 1978, but have yet to make it out of the first round. Nevertheless, they created history in that 1978 tournament in Argentina by becoming the first African side to win a World Cup match, beating Mexico 3–1. They also held defending champions West Germany to a goalless draw before bowing out. They have since qualified for the three tournaments in succession, in 1998, 2002 and 2006: they were the only African team to appear at both the 2002 and 2006 tournaments.

Tunisia also won the 2004 Africa Cup of Nations, when they hosted the tournament.

History

Beginning (1928-1956)

Tunisian team in 1939

Before independence, a team regroups from 1928 the best Tunisian players playing in the Tunisian League and playing friendly games against regional and international teams. On 11 March 1928, Tunisia played against the France national football B team, the match ended in a French victory (8-2). On 23 March 1930, Tunisia was crushed by the same team (0-5) and again on 26 March 1933 (1-6). The team knows its first victory in 1939 against a team of amateur footballers of Paris, with a score of (4-1).

After independence (1957-1962)

Tunisia gained independence from France on 20 March 1956. The Tunisian Football Federation was founded on 29 March 1957 and became affiliated to FIFA in 1960 while joining the Confederation of African Football. The first match of independent Tunisia is played against Algeria on 1 June 1957, in full context of the Algerian War. The match ended in a Tunisian defeat (2-1). Shortly afterwards, on July 24, 1960, the team of Tunisia experienced its biggest defeat against Hungary on the score of (10-1). Less than a month later, on August 18, 1960 the team of Tunisia crushes Taiwan on the score of (8-1), which is still his biggest victory.

Golden generation (1962-1978)

Tunisia in 1978

In 1962, Tunisia started the African Cup of Nations qualification, Tunisia qualified to finish third in the competition held the same year. Three years later, it organized 1965 African Cup of Nations: it reached the final against Ghana. After opening score for Ghana by Frank Odoi, Tunisia equalized through Abdelmajid Chetali and then took the lead thanks to a goal from Tahar Chaïbi. However, in the 79th minute, Osei Kofi equalizes for Ghana and both teams are competing for extra time. In the 96th minute, Odoi scored the victory goal for Ghana. Tunisia did not enter for the 1970,1972and 1974qualification. In 1973, the team competed and won Palestine Cup of Nations; Mohieddine Habita (6 goals), Mohamed Akid (6 goals) and Ezzedine Chakroun (5 goals). it flies over the competition, winning 6 wins in as many encounters with 19 goals scored and 3 conceded.

Habib Bourguiba, Habib Bourguiba, President of the Republic, amid the players forming the selection that won the Palestine Cup in 1973

In 1975, Tunisia returned to the qualification, after eliminating Libya in the preliminary round and Algeria in the first round; it is finally eliminated in the second round by Sudan. In 1977, under his new coach, Abdelmajid Chetali, Tunisia qualified for 1978 African Cup of Nations and at the same time qualified for his first World Cup by eliminating Egypt and Nigeria. At the 1978 African Cup, and after a first round where it eliminated Morocco (holders), Tunisia lost in the semi-finals against Ghana. For the match counting for the third place, it finds Nigeria.

It leads quickly with a goal from Mohamed Akid, Nigeria equalizes in the 42nd minute despite the challenges of the Tunisians, who decide to leave the field; they lose the game by abandon on a score of (2-0).

In their first World Cup game, the team made a big impact when they dominated Mexico (3-1), becoming the first African team to win a World Cup final match. A few days later, Tarak Dhiab's partners realized a good result against West Germany which is the defending champions (0-0). However, they lost against Poland (0-1) and can not qualify for the second round.

Failings (1978-1994)

From this first experience in the world cup, Tunisia experienced a fall in its results: they failed to qualify for the African Cups of 1980, 1984, 1986, 1988, 1990 and 1992. The results were the same in FIFA World Cup. They qualified for 1982 African Cup of Nations held in Libya and were eliminated in the first round.

Beginning of Renewal (1994-2002)

It is not until the 1994 African Cup of Nations to see Tunisia in the final phase. Playing at home, the expectation of supporters was great. But the team of Youssef Zouaoui bowed during the opening match against Mali (0-2) before tying in her second game against Zaire. It finished last of his group and was eliminated in the first round.

As a result of this elimination, a new coach was appointed, Henryk Kasperczak. Tunisia qualified for 1996 African Cup of Nations; a new generation is called and finishes second of his group by qualifying for the quarter-finals. This team eliminates Gabon in the quarter-finals and Zambia in the semi-finals respectively. It has played her first final in 31 years, but has lost to the host country South Africa (2-0).

Still under the impetus of Kasperczak, they disputed the 1998 African Cup of Nations after qualifying when it was eliminated in the quarter-finals by the host country, Burkina Faso. That same year they also played their first World Cup in 20 years where they were eliminated in the first round. Kasperczak is sacked in full competition due to this failure: However Adel Sellimi's team were beaten (2–0) by England, and (1–0) by Colombia. Their only point was in a 1–1 draw with Romania.

Tunisia then disputed the 2000 African Cup of Nations, where they were eliminated in the semi-finals by Cameroon and were eliminated in the first round in 2002 African Cup of Nations without scoring any goal. The Tunisian team qualified for the 2002 FIFA World Cup for the third time. After reaching their second successive World Cup, co-hosted by South Korea and Japan. They started with a (2–0) loss against Russia, but a Raouf Bouzaiene free kick gave them a (1–1) draw against Belgium. Their final game resulted in a (2–0) defeat to co-hosts Japan, meaning they were knocked out in the group stage.

Era Lemerre and Continental Consecration (2002-2008)

Following the World Cup, Roger Lemerre is named coach of Tunisia with the goal of winning the 2004 African Cup of Nations that will take place in Tunisia. After interesting matches against France (1-1) and Portugal (1-1) and a victory over Sweden (2-1), they presented themselves with the status of favorite.

After a draw against Guinea (1-1) and two victories against Rwanda (2-1) and DR Congo (3-0) in the first round, Tunisians beat Senegal (1-0), in the semi-finals, they eliminated Nigeria on penalties (1-1). In the final, Tunisia won Morocco (2-1) thanks to goals from Francileudo Santos and Ziad Jaziri; coach Lemerre is the first coach to achieve the double of the European championship and the African Cup of Nations. The nickname of the Eagles of Carthage really made its appearance in the collective consciousness during this African Cup. Moreover, this victory is worth to the Tunisian Federation of football the change of its logo, the new one representing an eagle.

Tunisian Supporters during the match of Tunisia-Ukraine in 2006 World Cup

The team then takes part in the 2005 FIFA Confederations Cup where they were eliminated from the first round but gives a glimpse of good prospects. It then qualified for the 2006 African Cup of Nations but was eliminated in the quarter-finals by Nigeria. She also plays the 2006 World Cup for the fourth time where she was eliminated again in the first round without any victory:it drew their opening game against Saudi Arabia (2–2), but lost their second match to Spain (3–1) and lost their last group match to Ukraine with a (1–0) defeat ending their 2006 World Cup.

During the 2008 Africa Cup of Nations, the team is eliminated in the quarter-finals by Cameroon (2-3) after finishing first in Group D ahead of Angola, Senegal and South Africa. On 30 June 2008, Roger Lemerre left Tunisia after 6 years.

Disillusionments (2008-2014)

The Portuguese coach Humberto Coelho was then appointed as new coach. He missed the qualification for the 2010 FIFA World Cup held in South Africa in the last game against Mozambique and was dismissed on 14 November 2009. Faouzi Benzarti is acting for the 2010 Africa Cup of Nations which were eliminated from the first round after three draws. In June 2010, Bertrand Marchand was appointed coach of the team for a two-year term with the goal of reaching the semifinals of the 2012 Africa Cup of Nations.

The 2012 Africa Cup of Nations qualification started with 2 defeats against Botswana and a draw against Malawi (2-2) in Radès which reduced her chances qualifying. On December 15, 2010, following a meeting of the federal office, Marchand was dismissed.


The beginning of 2011 is marked in Tunisia by the revolution. Without preparation, the team flies under the leadership of Sami Trabelsi for the 2011 African Nations Championship they defeated DR Congo (defending champions) in quarter-finals and Algeria in the semi-finals. In the final, they played with Angola and easily won the match (3-0).

On 8 October, the team qualified for the 2012 by defeating Togo (2-0). After a good start, with victories against Morocco (2-1) and Niger, and two goals from Youssef Msakni, it fell against Gabon (host country) on the score of (0-1), Tunisia was eliminated in the quarter-finals after extra time against Ghana (1-2).

On February 29, 2012, they drew against Peru (1-1). In the 2014 FIFA World Cup qualification, Tunisia falls into a group consisting of Cape Verde, Equatorial Guinea and Sierra Leone; they won Equatorial Guinea (3-1) and Cape Verde (2-1) and then qualified on 13 October for 2013 African Cup of Nations. For their first game, Tunisia won against Algeria (1-0) thanks to a shot, elected best goal of the CAN 2013, Youssef Msakni. Then the Eagles of Carthage are crushed by the Ivory Coast (3-0). Tunisia was eliminated at the expense of Togo (1-1). In February 2013, Sami Trabelsi was replaced by Nabil Maâloul. For his first two matches as coach, in qualifying for the 2014 World Cup, Tunisia defeated Sierra Leone (2-1) and snatched the draw (2-2) in Freetown. Then they drew with Equatorial Guinea (1-1). On 7 September, the team is beaten at home by Cape Verde (0-2) and was eliminated from the World Cup qualifying; Maaloul announces in the wake his resignation. On 12 September, however, FIFA qualified Tunisia following the disqualification of Cape Verde due to cheating. In they play-offs: Tunisia drew against Cameroon (0-0) and fails in Cameroonian lands (4-1), thus missing his qualification. Ruud Krol leaves after only two games.

Revival (2014-)

Georges Leekens was appointed coach in early 2014 to bring a new breath to a missing team of outposts in Africa. The friendly results are positive with a draw against Colombia (1-1), a success on South Korea (0-1) and a defeat against Belgium. For 2015 Africa Cup of Nations qualification, the Tunisians finish first after beating Senegal and Egypt.But they were eliminated from the quarter-finals in the final phase by Equatorial Guinea (1-2), the host country, after extensions, following several arbitration decisions disputed by several media, journalists and Players. On June 27, 2015, the Tunisian Federation announced that it had terminated its contract amicably. In July 2015, Henryk Kasperczak was appointed again as a coach after 17 years and reach with them the quarter-finals in CAN 2017 after being eliminated against Burkina Faso (0-2) so he was sacked. On April 27, 2017, Nabil Maâloul became the coach of Tunisia again, with the mission to qualify the Eagles of Carthage for the 2018 FIFA World Cup and reach the Semi-Final of the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations.

Home Stadium

The Stade Olympique de Radès the home stadium of Tunisia national team.

After the independence of Tunisia in 1956, the Tunisian national stadium was Stade Chedly Zouiten which has a capacity of 18,000 and hosted all the matches of the Tunisian team, it hosted also the 1965, 1994 African Cup of Nations and the 1977 FIFA World Youth Championship before it was replaced after the construction of Stade El Menzah (45,000) in 1967 for the 1967 Mediterranean Games. Tunisia's first match at the stadium was played on 8 September 1967 against Libya. Tunisia won the match 3–0. This stadium became the new stronghold of the Eagles of Carthage. It hosted the 1977 FIFA World Youth Championship and was completely renovated for the 1994 African Cup of Nations. It hosted also the 2004 Africa Cup of Nations. In 2001, the Stade Olympique de Radès was inaugurated as Tunisia's national stadium ahead of the 2001 Mediterranean Games. Located in Radès, the stadium has an all-seater capacity of 60,000. The first match at the stadium was played on 7 July 2001 against between ES Sahel and CS Hammam-Lif for the Tunisian Cup final. CS Hammam-Lif won the match 1–0, with Anis Ben Chouikha scoring the lone goal. Since that match, Tunisia has used the stadium for almost every major home game, including the 2004 African Cup final. The Tunisians often hosts their matches in Stade Mustapha Ben Jannet in Monastir which has a capacity of 20,000 for its excellent ground, whether in the African Cup of Nations qualification, World Cup qualification or friendly matches.

Competition records

World Cup record

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
Uruguay 1930 to
Sweden 1958
Did Not Enter - - - - - -
Chile 1962 Did Not Qualify 3 1 1 1 4 4
England 1966 Withdrew - - - - - -
Mexico 1970 Did Not Qualify 5 1 4 0 4 3
West Germany 1974 4 1 1 2 5 5
Argentina 1978 Group Stage 9th 3 1 1 1 3 2 10 4 4 2 15 9
Spain 1982 Did Not Qualify 2 1 0 1 2 2
Mexico 1986 8 4 0 4 11 9
Italy 1990 10 4 1 5 10 11
United States 1994 6 3 3 0 14 2
France 1998 Group Stage 26th 3 0 1 2 1 4 8 7 1 0 15 2
South Korea Japan 2002 Group Stage 29th 3 0 1 2 1 5 10 8 2 0 28 5
Germany 2006 Group Stage 24th 3 0 1 2 3 6 10 6 3 1 25 9
South Africa 2010 Did Not Qualify 12 7 3 2 18 7
Brazil 2014 8 4 3 1 14 10
Russia 2018 TBD 6 5 1 0 11 5
Qatar 2022 TBD
Total Group Stage 4/20 12 1 4 7 8 17 102 56 27 19 176 83

FIFA Confederations Cup

FIFA Confederations Cup record
Appearances : 1
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad
Saudi Arabia 1992 Did Not Qualify
Saudi Arabia 1995
Saudi Arabia 1997
Mexico 1999
South Korea Japan 2001
France 2003
Germany 2005 Group Stage 6th 3 1 0 2 3 5 Squad
South Africa 2009 Did Not Qualify
Brazil 2013
Russia 2017
Qatar 2021 To Be Determined
Total Group Stage 1/10 3 1 0 2 3 5 -

Africa Cup of Nations record

Africa Cup of Nations record
Appearances : 18
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
Sudan 1957 Did not enter
United Arab Republic 1959
Ethiopia 1962 Third Place 3rd 2 1 0 1 5 4
Ghana 1963 Group Stage 5th 2 0 1 1 3 5
Tunisia 1965 Runner-up 2nd 3 1 1 1 6 3
Ethiopia 1968 Did not qualify
Sudan 1970 Did not enter
Cameroon 1972
Egypt 1974
Ethiopia 1976 Did not qualify
Ghana 1978 Fourth Place 4th 5 1 3 1 5 4
Nigeria 1980 Withdrew
Libya 1982 Group Stage 7th 3 0 1 2 1 4
Ivory Coast 1984 Did not qualify
Egypt 1986
Morocco 1988
Algeria 1990
Senegal 1992
Tunisia 1994 Group Stage 9th 2 0 1 1 1 3
South Africa 1996 Runner-up 2nd 6 2 2 2 10 9
Burkina Faso 1998 Quarter-finals 5th 4 2 1 1 6 5
Ghana Nigeria 2000 Fourth Place 4th 6 2 2 2 6 9
Mali 2002 Group Stage 11th 3 0 2 1 0 1
Tunisia 2004 Champions 1st 6 4 2 0 10 4
Egypt 2006 Quarter-finals 6th 4 2 1 1 7 5
Ghana 2008 Quarter-finals 5th 4 1 2 1 7 6
Angola 2010 Group Stage 12th 3 0 3 0 3 3
GabonEquatorial Guinea 2012 Quarter-finals 6th 4 2 0 2 5 5
South Africa 2013 Group Stage 12th 3 1 1 1 2 4
Equatorial Guinea 2015 Quarter-finals 7th 4 1 2 1 5 5
Gabon 2017 Quarter-finals 8th 4 2 0 2 6 7
Cameroon 2019 To be determined
Ivory Coast 2021
Guinea 2023
Total 1 Title 18/30 68 22 25 21 88 86

Arab Nations Cup record

Arab Nations Cup
Appearances: 2
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA
Lebanon 1963 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 11 1
Kuwait 1964 Did not enter
Iraq 1966
Saudi Arabia 1985
Jordan 1988 Group Stage 7th 4 0 3 1 3 4
Syria 1992 Did not enter
Qatar 1998
Kuwait 2002
Saudi Arabia 2012
Total Champions 2/9 8 4 3 1 14 5

Honours

This is a list of honours for the senior Tunisia national team

African Competitions

Coppa Africa.svg Africa Cup of Nations

African Nations Championship

  • Gold medal africa.svg Champions (1): 2011

African Games

  • Silver medal africa.svg Silver Medal (1): 1991
  • Bronze medal africa.svg Bronze Medal (1): 2007

Arabic Competitions

Arab Cup of Nations

  • 1st, gold medalist(s) Champions (1): 1963

Palestine Cup of Nations

  • 1st, gold medalist(s) Champions (1): 1973

Pan Arab Games

  • 2nd, silver medalist(s) Silver Medal (1): 1957

Other Competitions

Mediterranean Games

  • 1st, gold medalist(s) Gold Medal (1): 2001
  • 2nd, silver medalist(s) Silver Medal (1): 1971
  • 3rd, bronze medalist(s) Bronze Medal (2): 1975, 2013

Personnel

Coaching Staff

Position Name
Head coach Tunisia Nabil Maâloul
Assistant Coach Tunisia Mourad Okbi
Tunisia Hatem Missaoui
Technical Advisor Tunisia Nader Daoud
Goalkeeping Coach Egypt Tarek Abdelalim
Fitness Coach Tunisia Jalel Herguli
Tunisia Mohamed Tounsi
Team Doctor Tunisia Souheil Chemli
Physiotherapists Tunisia Akrem Hbiri
Tunisia Majdi Turki
Tunisia Fathi Naoui

Managers

Name Nationality Years as Manager Best Results
Rachid Turki Tunisia Tunisia 1956–1957
Hechmi Cherif
Larbi Soudani
Habib Draoua
Tunisia Tunisia
Tunisia Tunisia
Algeria Algeria
1957–1960
Milan Kristić Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Yugoslavia 1960–1961 Qualification to 1960 Summer Olympics
Frane Matošić Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Yugoslavia 1961–1962 Bronze medal africa.svg 1962 African Cup of Nations Third Place
André Gérard France France 1963–1965 1st, gold medalist(s) 1963 Arab Nations Cup Champions
Mokhtar Ben Nacef Tunisia Tunisia 1965–1968 Silver medal africa.svg 1965 African Cup of Nations Runners-Up
Radojica Radojičić Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Yugoslavia 1968–1970
Sereta Begovic Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Yugoslavia 1969
Ameur Hizem Tunisia Tunisia 1970–1974
André Nagy Hungary Hungary 1974–1975
Abdelmajid Chetali Tunisia Tunisia 1975–1978 1978 African Cup of Nations Fourth Place
Qualification to 1978 FIFA World Cup
Ameur Hizem Tunisia Tunisia 1978–1979
Hmid Dhib Tunisia Tunisia 1979–1980
Ryszard Kulesza Poland Poland 1981–1983
Youssef Zouaoui Tunisia Tunisia 1984–1986
Jean Vincent France France 1986–1987
Taoufik Ben Othman Tunisia Tunisia 1987–1988 Qualification to 1988 Summer Olympics
Antoni Piechniczek Poland Poland 1988
Mokhtar Tlili Tunisia Tunisia 1988–1989
Antoni Piechniczek Poland Poland 1989
Mrad Mahjoub Tunisia Tunisia 1990–1993
Youssef Zouaoui Tunisia Tunisia 1993-1994
Henryk Kasperczak Poland Poland 1994–1998 Silver medal africa.svg 1996 African Cup of Nations Runners-Up
Qualification to 1996 Summer Olympics
Qualification to 1998 FIFA World Cup
Francesco Scoglio Italy Italy 1998–2001 2000 African Cup of Nations Fourth Place
Eckhard Krautzun Germany Germany 2001 Qualification to 2002 FIFA World Cup
Henri Michel France France 2001–2002
Ammar Souayah Tunisia Tunisia 2002
Roger Lemerre France France 2002–2008 Gold medal africa.svg 2004 African Cup of Nations Champions
Qualification to 2004 Summer Olympics
Qualification to 2005 FIFA Confederations Cup
Qualification to 2006 FIFA World Cup
Humberto Coelho Portugal Portugal 2008–2009
Faouzi Benzarti Tunisia Tunisia 2009–2010
Bertrand Marchand France France 2010
Sami Trabelsi Tunisia Tunisia 2010–2013 1st, gold medalist(s) 2011 African Nations Championship Champions
Nabil Maâloul Tunisia Tunisia 2013
Ruud Krol Netherlands Netherlands 2013
Georges Leekens Belgium Belgium 2014–2015
Henryk Kasperczak Poland Poland 2015–2017
Nabil Maâloul Tunisia Tunisia 2017–present

Recent results and forthcoming fixtures

This is a list of matches from the last twelve months and any future scheduled matches.

2016

2017

2018

Players

Current squad

The following 24 players were called up for the 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification against DR Congo in September 2017.[1]
Caps and goals updated as January 28, 2017 after the match against Burkina Faso.[2]

0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Aymen Mathlouthi (Captain) (1984-09-14) 14 September 1984 (age 33) 68 0 Tunisia Étoile du Sahel
1GK Moez Ben Cherifia (1991-06-24) 24 June 1991 (age 26) 18 0 Tunisia Espérance de Tunis
1GK Farouk Ben Mustapha (1989-07-01) 1 July 1989 (age 28) 14 0 Saudi Arabia Al-Shabab

2DF Yassine Meriah (1993-07-02) 2 July 1993 (age 24) 10 1 Tunisia CS Sfaxien
12 2DF Ali Maâloul (1990-01-01) 1 January 1990 (age 27) 40 0 Egypt Al Ahly
2DF Syam Ben Youssef (1989-12-31) 31 December 1989 (age 27) 38 1 Turkey Kasımpaşa
6 2DF Rami Bedoui (1990-01-19) 19 January 1990 (age 27) 8 0 Tunisia Étoile du Sahel
21 2DF Hamdi Nagguez (1992-10-28) 28 October 1992 (age 24) 12 0 Tunisia Étoile du Sahel
2DF Oussama Haddadi (1992-01-28) 28 January 1992 (age 25) 3 0 France Dijon FCO
2DF Hamza Mathlouthi (1992-05-25) 25 May 1992 (age 25) 24 0 Tunisia CS Sfaxien
2DF Khalil Chemmam (1987-07-04) 4 July 1987 (age 30) 21 0 Tunisia Espérance de Tunis

14 3MF Mohamed Amine Ben Amor (1992-01-01) 1 January 1992 (age 25) 22 1 Tunisia Étoile du Sahel
3MF Ghailene Chaalali (1994-02-28) 28 February 1994 (age 23) 3 1 Tunisia Espérance de Tunis
13 3MF Ferjani Sassi (1992-03-18) 18 March 1992 (age 25) 33 2 Tunisia Espérance de Tunis
3MF Karim Aouadhi (1986-05-02) 2 May 1986 (age 31) 9 1 Tunisia CS Sfaxien
3MF Hamza Jelassi (1991-09-29) 29 September 1991 (age 25) 1 0 Tunisia CA Bizertin
3MF Bassem Srarfi (1997-06-25) 25 June 1997 (age 20) 0 0 France Nice
10 3MF Wahbi Khazri (1991-02-08) 8 February 1991 (age 26) 32 11 England Sunderland

4FW Youssef Msakni (1990-10-28) 28 October 1990 (age 26) 45 6 Qatar Al-Duhail SC
11 4FW Taha Yassine Khenissi (1992-01-06) 6 January 1992 (age 25) 18 4 Tunisia Espérance de Tunis
4FW Yoann Touzghar (1986-11-28) 28 November 1986 (age 30) 3 1 France Auxerre
8 4FW Fakhreddine Ben Youssef (1991-06-21) 21 June 1991 (age 26) 28 4 Tunisia Espérance de Tunis
23 4FW Naïm Sliti (1992-07-27) 27 July 1992 (age 25) 10 3 France Dijon FCO
18 4FW Anice Badri (1990-08-18) 18 August 1990 (age 27) 1 0 Tunisia Espérance de Tunis

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up to the squad within the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Rami Jridi (1985-04-25) 25 April 1985 (age 32) 17 0 Tunisia CS Sfaxien 2017 Africa Cup of Nations

DF Dylan Bronn (1995-06-19) 19 June 1995 (age 22) 3 0 Belgium K.A.A. Gent v.  Egypt, 11 June 2017
DF Aymen Belaïd (1989-01-02) 2 January 1989 (age 28) 3 0 England Rotherham United F.C. v.  Egypt, 11 June 2017
DF Chamseddine Dhaouadi (1987-01-16) 16 January 1987 (age 30) 10 0 Tunisia Espérance de Tunis v.  Egypt, 11 June 2017
DF Zied Boughattas (1987-07-21) 21 July 1987 (age 30) 7 0 Tunisia Étoile du Sahel v.  Egypt, 11 June 2017
DF Sliman Kchouk (1994-05-07) 7 May 1994 (age 23) 1 0 Tunisia CA Bizertin 2017 Africa Cup of Nations
DF Ali Machani (1993-07-12) 12 July 1993 (age 24) 2 1 Tunisia Espérance 2017 Africa Cup of Nations preliminary squad
DF Ghazi Abderrazzak (1986-10-16)16 October 1986 (aged 30) 0 0 Tunisia Étoile du Sahel 2017 Africa Cup of Nations preliminary squad

MF Karim Laribi (1991-04-20) 20 April 1991 (age 26) 2 0 Italy A.C. Cesena v.  Egypt, 11 June 2017
MF Hamza Lahmar (1990-02-28) 28 February 1990 (age 27) 13 2 Tunisia ES Sahel v.  Morocco, 28 March 2017
MF Idriss Mhirsi (1994-02-21) 21 February 1994 (age 23) 4 0 France Red Star F.C. v.  Egypt, 11 June 2017
MF Ahmed Khalil (1994-12-21) 21 December 1994 (age 22) 2 0 Tunisia Club Africain 2017 Africa Cup of Nations
MF Änis Ben-Hatira (1988-07-18) 18 July 1988 (age 29) 11 1 Unattached 2017 Africa Cup of Nations preliminary squad
MF Iheb Msakni (1987-07-18) 18 July 1987 (age 30) 7 0 Tunisia Étoile du Sahel 2017 Africa Cup of Nations preliminary squad
MF Issam Ben Khémis (1996-01-10) 10 January 1996 (age 21) 1 0 England Doncaster Rovers F.C. 2017 Africa Cup of Nations preliminary squad
MF Nejmeddin Daghfous (1986-10-01) 1 October 1986 (age 30) 0 0 Germany SV Sandhausen 2017 Africa Cup of Nations preliminary squad
MF Issam Jebali (1991-12-25) 25 December 1991 (age 25) 0 0 Sweden Elfsborg 2017 Africa Cup of Nations preliminary squad
MF Fabien Camus (1985-02-28) 28 February 1985 (age 32) 3 1 Belgium Royal Antwerp v.  Guinea, 9 October 2016

MF Ismail Sassi (1991-12-24) 24 December 1991 (age 25) 1 0 Cyprus AEL Limassol v.  Egypt, 11 June 2017
FW Saber Khalifa (1986-10-14) 14 October 1986 (age 30) 41 7 Tunisia Club Africain 2017 Africa Cup of Nations
FW Hamdi Harbaoui (1985-01-05) 5 January 1985 (age 32) 15 4 Belgium Anderlecht 2017 Africa Cup of Nations preliminary squad
FW Abdelkader Oueslati (1991-10-07) 7 October 1991 (age 25) 8 0 Saudi Arabia Al-Fateh 2017 Africa Cup of Nations preliminary squad
FW Khaled Ayari (1990-01-17) 17 January 1990 (age 27) 0 0 Unattached 2017 Africa Cup of Nations preliminary squad

Records

Most capped players

Most Caps[3]
# Player Caps Goals Career
1 Radhi Jaïdi 105 7 1996–2009
2 Khaled Badra 97 12 1995–2006
3 Khaled Ben Yahia 95 5 1979–1993
Kaies Ghodhbane 95 6 1995–2006
5 Chokri El Ouaer 93 0 1993–2002
6 Riadh Bouazizi 92 3 1995–2006
7 Tarak Dhiab 89 12 1974–1990
8 Sadok Sassi 116 0 1963–1978
9 Mohamed Ali Mahjoubi 86 17 1985–1995
Sirajeddine Chihi 86 4 1991–2001

Players in bold are still active.

Top goalscorers

Top Goalscorers[3]
# Player Goals Caps Career
1 Issam Jemâa 36 83 2005–
2 Francileudo Santos 21 41 2004–2008
3 Adel Sellimi 20 78 1991–2002
4 Faouzi Rouissi 18 57 1989–2001
5 Mohamed Ali Mahjoubi 17 86 1985–1995
6 Zoubeir Baya 16 83 1994–2002
7 Mohamed Salah Jedidi 15 32 1962–1965
Ziad Jaziri 15 63 1999–2007
9 Mohieddine Habita 14 25 1972–1980
Hassen Gabsi 14 50 1997–2002

Players in bold are still active.

Historic Kits

Kit Providers

Name Start End
Germany Adidas 1970's 1992
Italy Lotto 1994 1998
Germany Uhlsport 2000 2001
Germany Puma 2002 2010
Switzerland Burrda 2010 2016
Germany Uhlsport 2016 present

Kit history

1978 World Cup
1998 World Cup Home
1998 World Cup Away
2002 World Cup Home
2006 World Cup Home
2006 World Cup Away

See also

Other football codes

References

  1. ^ "Liste des convoqués pour RD Congo vs Tunisie" (in French). Fédération Tunisienne de Football. 22 August 2017. 
  2. ^ "Tunisia". 
  3. ^ a b Imed Kilani. "Tunisia – Record International Players". RSSSF. Retrieved 2013-08-16. 

External links

  • Tunisian FA official site
  • Tunisia World Cup Team Blog
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Tunisia_national_football_team&oldid=801713530"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunisia_national_football_team
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Tunisia national football team"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA