Trump Parc Stamford

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Trump Parc Stamford
Trump Parc Stamford.png
General information
Status Complete
Type Condominiums
Address 1 Broad Street
Town or city Stamford, Connecticut
Country United States
Coordinates 41°03′19″N 73°32′34″W / 41.055363°N 73.542898°W / 41.055363; -73.542898Coordinates: 41°03′19″N 73°32′34″W / 41.055363°N 73.542898°W / 41.055363; -73.542898
Named for Donald Trump
Groundbreaking May 15, 2007
Opened September 2009
Cost $160 million (2007 estimate)
Height 350 feet
Technical details
Floor count 34
Design and construction
Architecture firm Costas Kondylis
Lessard Design Inc.
Developer Donald Trump
Thomas Rich
Louis R. Cappelli
Main contractor George A. Fuller Company
Other information
Number of units 170
Website
trumpparcstamford.com

Trump Parc Stamford is a 34-story condominium property named after Donald Trump and located at 1 Broad Street in Stamford, Connecticut. Real estate developers Thomas Rich and Louis R. Cappelli began planning the project as Park Tower in February 2006; it was renamed after Trump joined the project later that year. The project was initially rejected by the city, as it was considered too large for its 0.5-acre (0.20 ha) site.

A revised smaller version of the project was approved in November 2006, and a groundbreaking ceremony was held in May 2007. Construction was delayed twice in 2008, after several construction incidents. Trump Parc opened in September 2009 as the tallest building in Stamford.

In 2015, during Trump's presidential campaign, Muslim groups in Stamford launched an unsuccessful attempt to have his name removed from the building after he proposed a temporary ban on Muslims entering the United States, a response to recent terrorist attacks conducted by people of the religion.

History

Early history and design

In February 2006, developers Thomas Rich and Louis R. Cappelli proposed Park Tower, a 37-story condominium tower that would stand 425 feet. The glass structure,[1] designed by Costas Kondylis and Lessard Design Inc.,[2] would be built on 0.5 acres (0.20 ha)[1] at the southeast corner of Broad Street and Washington Boulevard in Stamford, Connecticut.[2] Park Tower, if built, would become the tallest building in Stamford, surpassing the city's Landmark Tower; it would also be the fifth tallest building in Connecticut.[1]

Rich, the president of Stamford's F. D. Rich Company,[3] owned the half-acre property as part of a 2.7-acre (1.1 ha) parcel that was jointly owned by an adjacent Target store,[4] which opened in October 2004.[2] Since 1980, approximately 15 earlier projects had been proposed for the 2.7-acre property, including a hotel.[2] Prior to the Target purchase, the property had been owned entirely by 33 Broad Street Associates, a partnership of Rich and Robert Kahn. After the Target store opened, Rich and Kahn began planning for development on the half-acre lot.[2] Although the half-acre site was currently landscaped with trees and park benches, Rich stated that he had always intended to develop the property.[4]

Cappelli subsequently purchased Kahn's interest in the property.[2] Cappelli was well known for his building projects in Westchester County, New York,[5] and had previously worked with Donald Trump on the Trump Tower at City Center and Trump Plaza condominium projects, both in New York.[3] In March 2006, Trump was in discussions to join the project, which was to include 185 condominium units.[6] In May 2006, the project – now known as Trump Parc – received approval from the local planning board despite being 70 feet taller than what current regulations allowed: 330 feet.[7][8] Although the building would stand 425 feet tall, zoning regulations meant that the building was only officially considered to be 400 feet tall.[9]

After approval from the planning board, residents expressed concerns that the new building would "Manhattanize" the city and cast shadows over the nearby Mill River Park.[10] Stamford mayor Dannel Malloy was supportive of the additional 70 feet requested for the tower, but was skeptical about the location chosen for the project.[11] During a Zoning Board meeting on June 12, 2006, discussions about whether to approve the project were abruptly ended after one member recused himself because of a potential conflict of interest, as he owned a mixed-use building near the proposed project.[12]

By mid-June 2006, a traffic study had been conducted to determine whether the project would significantly affect traffic.[13] Later that month, Rich and Cappelli insisted that the tower be built as high as deemed necessary, in order to produce a profit.[14] It was subsequently reported that executives of F. D. Rich Company and Cappelli Enterprises had donated $26,000 to Malloy's campaign in the 2006 Connecticut governor election. Thomas Rich stated that the donations were unrelated to the project.[15]

By June 24, 2006, the developers submitted revised plans for the project to make it less obtrusive.[16] On June 26, 2006, the Zoning Board unanimously rejected the project; although they praised its design, they believed it was too large for the half-acre site.[17][18] Rich and Cappelli began considering their options for the site.[19]

In September 2006, revised plans by Costas Kondylis and Lessard Design were revealed for Trump Parc that would reduce its height by 50 feet, down to 350 feet; the building would be reduced from 37 stories to 34. Other changes included some parking spaces being relocated underground, while an above-ground parking garage was reduced from five stories to four. The redesign consisted of 177 units, rather than 184.[2][20] The Zoning Board approved the revised project in November 2006.[21][22] It was estimated that $18 million to $24 million was lost because of the redesign, as an additional six penthouses could have been built in the floors that were removed from the final design.[23]

Construction and delays

In March 2007, Thomas Rich announced that construction would begin by July.[24] A groundbreaking ceremony was held on May 15, 2007. Trump, former MSNBC anchor Rita Cosby and lawyer Mickey Sherman were among more than 125 people who attended the event, at which Cosby served as emcee.[25][26][27][28] Trump, Malloy, and state lieutenant governor Michael Fedele gave speeches during the event.[28] Condominium units went on sale the same day,[23] with the opening of a sales office and model condominium unit inside the neighboring Target store. Actual construction could not begin until a building permit was issued for the foundation; it was believed that construction could begin as soon as early June 2007. The project was expected to cost $160 million, including $150 million in financing from the Bank of Scotland.[27] The project's general contractor was George A. Fuller Company.[29] Trump Parc was expected to become the first LEED-certified building in Connecticut.[3]

In early August 2007, the trees located on the property were removed and donated to local parks, allowing for the start of the building's foundation.[2] In September 2007, scenes were shot outside Trump Parc and inside its model apartments for the film Righteous Kill.[30][31][32] By that time, 27 units had been sold in the project.[23] By January 2008, Vince McMahon purchased one of the project's penthouses.[33] In February 2008, construction had reached the fourth floor, while 42 units had been sold up to that time.[34]

In May 2008, a 10-pound piece of metal plunged 25 floors from the building during construction and tore through a water delivery truck, striking the driver in the right shoulder and leaving minor injuries.[35][36] The following month, a three-foot-long piece of cable fell from the 29th floor and crushed the roof of a car below, but did not result in any injuries.[37][36] Construction was halted for the weekend so workers could undergo a safety training session.[38]

In July 2008, a round metal object, approximately three inches long, fell from the building and crashed through a window at the University of Connecticut at Stamford, located across the street. While no one was injured, city officials halted construction again that day after discovering that adequate safety measures had not been taken. City officials planned to appoint an onsite inspector to monitor future progress at the project.[39][40][41][42][43] Construction resumed on July 31, 2008.[29]

On August 2, 2008, a four-by-four piece of wood fell from the building and crashed through the roof of a postal truck. The university subsequently closed its main entrance to protect students.[44][45][46][47][48] While Cappelli called the incident "inexcusable," he noted that weather may have been a factor: "You had a perfectly beautiful summer day that turned into a 50-mph wind gust."[44] On August 6, 2008, city officials agreed to have a covered walkway constructed to protect students and other pedestrians, while also planning to put up signs directing students away from the construction site.[49]

Opening and operation

The first sales for units in the building were finalized on September 18, 2009, while the first tenants began moving in over the next two days. Other new residents were expected to move in over the following few months. The lowest floors were to be occupied first. The project featured 170 units, of which 70 were under contract. Two of the project's six penthouses had been sold up to that time. Amenities included a 24-hour concierge desk, a billiards room, a gym, a lounge, a pool, and a rooftop deck. The ground floor featured a 3,500 sq ft (330 m2) area designed to accommodate a restaurant and bar, but a tenant had yet to occupy the space.[5] The structure, made of glass, was the tallest building in Stamford at the time of its opening, standing 350 feet with 34 floors.[5][50]

Because of a poor economy, Rich chose to heavily market the property ahead of its opening, and also reduced prices by more than 15 percent on select units, with starting prices at $650,000. Promotional advertisements were mailed to 30,000 Manhattan apartment residents. Advertisements were also put in local newspapers, appeared on Metro-North Railroad trains, and were aired on New York's WCBS radio station.[5][51]

In October 2009, Vince and Linda McMahon purchased a 3,900 sq ft (360 m2) penthouse duplex at Trump Parc Stamford for $4.1 million. It was the only other penthouse to have been sold up to that time.[52] McMahon was also a member of the condominium board.[53] In 2009 and 2010, a stair-climbing charity competition was organized by the American Lung Association and was held at Trump Parc Stamford, where people raced to the top floor.[54][55] Actress Essence Atkins became a resident in 2010.[56]

Proposed renaming

In December 2015, during his presidential campaign, Trump called for a temporary ban on Muslims entering the United States after recent terrorist attacks that were conducted by people of the religion. A coalition of Muslim groups in Stamford subsequently urged F. D. Rich Company to remove Trump's name from the Trump Parc building,[57][58] writing to the company, "It is highly offensive to Fairfield County's diverse multi-ethnic community to have a well-known building carry the name of someone who has made a wide variety of xenophobic statements."[58]

Thomas Rich stated that he was unable to rename the building as ownership of the condominiums was transferred to purchasers two years earlier. Rich said that the building was managed by Trump's company, The Trump Organization, and that Trump Parc "has a wide cross section of resident owners that represent a variety of races, religious backgrounds and political affiliations."[57] Rich also said that renaming the building would be difficult as it was 90 percent sold.[58]

Linda McMahon declined to comment on the proposed renaming, while a spokesperson for the building wrote, "The Homeowners Association of Trump Parc Stamford is aware of the current situation but is not in a position to make a public statement at this time."[59] Malloy, who by that time was now the governor of Connecticut, called on Trump to waive any financial penalties that would be imposed on people who remove his name from their properties.[57] The building ultimately retained its name.[60]

References

  1. ^ a b c Dalena, Doug (February 15, 2006). "Towering proposal". The Stamford Advocate. Retrieved July 22, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Squire, Bill (September 1, 2007). "Going vertical". Stamford Plus. Retrieved July 27, 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c Dykstra, Katherine (May 17, 2007). "Park Place". New York Post. Retrieved July 21, 2017. 
  4. ^ a b Prevost, Lisa (June 11, 2006). "Donald Trump Wants to Be the Biggest". The New York Times. Retrieved July 21, 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c d Kim, Elizabeth (September 24, 2009). "Stamford's Trump Parc condominiums open". The Stamford Advocate. Retrieved July 21, 2017. 
  6. ^ "Trump joins project to build Stamford tower". The Stamford Advocate. March 14, 2006. Retrieved July 22, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  7. ^ "Trump Parc tower moves to next step". Knight-Ridder/Tribune Business News. May 3, 2006. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  8. ^ "Developers defend height of proposed Trump Parc tower". Knight-Ridder/Tribune Business News. May 9, 2006. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  9. ^ "Questions and answers". The Stamford Advocate. June 19, 2006. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. Q. I've read that the building as proposed would be 400 feet tall, but I've also read that it would be 425 feet tall. Which is it? A. Both. With mechanical spaces on the roof, the 37-story building would rise 425 feet from the sidewalk. But zoning regulations measure building height in of usable space without the mechanical "penthouse." Using that measure, the building would be 400 feet high. 
  10. ^ "Residents have say on plan for Trump Parc". The Stamford Advocate. May 23, 2006. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  11. ^ "Zoning Board to decide fate of 425-foot-tall Trump Parc plan". The Stamford Advocate. June 12, 2006. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  12. ^ Dalena, Doug (June 13, 2006). "Board halts discussion of Trump tower; member cites potential conflict". The Stamford Advocate. Archived from the original on June 23, 2006. 
  13. ^ "Traffic at proposed Trump tower under review". The Stamford Advocate. June 17, 2006. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  14. ^ "Condo developers push for extra height". The Stamford Advocate. June 19, 2006. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  15. ^ "Condo developers donate to Malloy's campaign". The Stamford Advocate. June 26, 2006. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  16. ^ "Developers revise plans for Trump Parc tower". The Stamford Advocate. June 24, 2006. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  17. ^ "Zoning Board rejects Trump Parc". The Stamford Advocate. June 27, 2006. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  18. ^ Prevost, Lisa (July 16, 2006). "Confronting a Pattern of Warped Growth / A Tower Denied". The New York Times. Retrieved July 21, 2017. 
  19. ^ "Future uncertain for site of proposed Trump Parc". The Stamford Advocate. July 10, 2006. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  20. ^ "Plans for Trump development are cut back". The Stamford Advocate. September 10, 2006. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  21. ^ "Board praises revamped Trump Parc proposal". The Stamford Advocate. November 14, 2006. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
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  23. ^ a b c Kobak, Steve (September 6, 2007). "Lack of luxury living in city gives Trump building a buzz". Greenwich Time. Retrieved July 27, 2017. 
  24. ^ "Stamford's Trump tower to sprout in summer". The Stamford Advocate. March 7, 2007. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  25. ^ "Trump Parc ceremony emcee Rita Cosby dines in Stamford". Greenwich Time. May 13, 2007. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  26. ^ "Trump builds Parc condos in Stamford". Connecticut Post. May 15, 2007. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  27. ^ a b Dalena, Doug (May 16, 2007). "Stamford plays Trump card". The Stamford Advocate. Archived from the original on May 20, 2007. 
  28. ^ a b Pinto, Amanda (September 6, 2007). "Trump-branded high-rise breaks ground". Greenwich Time. Retrieved July 27, 2017. 
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  31. ^ "Urban Fakery". New York Post. September 27, 2007. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  32. ^ "The closer". New York Daily News. September 20, 2007. Retrieved July 21, 2017. 
  33. ^ "The Closer". New York Daily News. January 3, 2008. Retrieved July 21, 2017. 
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  35. ^ "Driver injured as metal falls from Trump Parc". The Stamford Advocate. May 23, 2008. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  36. ^ a b Wright, Chase (July 29, 2008). "Trump Parc cleared for construction". Greenwich Time. Retrieved July 27, 2017. 
  37. ^ "Object falls at the site of Trump Parc". The Stamford Advocate. June 7, 2008. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
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  39. ^ "City vows to act after debris falls from Trump Parc". The Stamford Advocate. July 24, 2008. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  40. ^ "Shut it down: Mayor orders safety steps for Trump site". The Stamford Advocate. July 25, 2008. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
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  42. ^ Wright, Chase (July 28, 2008). "Most of Trump Parc cleared for construction". Greenwich Time. Retrieved July 27, 2017. 
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  46. ^ "Reps seek hearing on Trump site safety". The Stamford Advocate. August 6, 2008. Retrieved July 21, 2017 – via NewsLibrary. 
  47. ^ "More debris falls". Greenwich Time. August 5, 2008. Retrieved July 27, 2017. 
  48. ^ Wright, Chase (August 19, 2008). "Committee questions officials on Trump Parc". Greenwich Time. Retrieved July 27, 2017. 
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  50. ^ "Trump Parc Stamford". Emporis. Retrieved July 21, 2017. 
  51. ^ Kim, Elizabeth (September 27, 2009). "As Trump Parc opens, developers and city hold their breath". The Stamford Advocate. Retrieved July 21, 2017. 
  52. ^ Kim, Elizabeth (March 1, 2010). "McMahons buy $4 million penthouse at Trump Parc in Stamford". Greenwich Time. Retrieved August 24, 2017. 
  53. ^ Ryan, Lidia (January 4, 2016). "On the Market: Trump Parc Stamford Units". Greenwich Time. Retrieved August 24, 2017. 
  54. ^ Morganteen, Jeff (November 7, 2009). "Firefighters, others race to top of Trump Parc for charity". Greenwich Time. Retrieved August 24, 2017. 
  55. ^ Just, Olivia (November 6, 2010). "Racers step up for a challenge". Greenwich Time. Retrieved August 24, 2017. 
  56. ^ King, Kate (November 5, 2010). "New TBS sitcom filming in Stamford". Greenwich Time. Retrieved August 24, 2017. Essence Atkins, who plays Crews' wife on the show, said she has recently moved to Trump Parc, which she called "a lovely property." 
  57. ^ a b c Vigdor, Neil (December 9, 2015). "Developer pressured to dump Trump". Connecticut Post. Retrieved July 21, 2017. 
  58. ^ a b c "Muslim group calls for removal of Trump's name from Stamford's tallest building". Greenwich Time. December 9, 2015. Retrieved August 24, 2017. 
  59. ^ Torres Ocasio, Keila (December 10, 2015). "Trump Parc residents silent on request to drop GOP candidate's name from Stamford building". Greenwich Time. Retrieved August 24, 2017. 
  60. ^ Naughton, Nora (November 23, 2016). "Group protests outside Stamford's Trump Parc". The Stamford Advocate. Retrieved August 24, 2017. 

External links

  • Official website
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