Tropical fascism

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In African political science, tropical fascism is a type of post-colonial state which is either considered fascist or is seen to have strong fascist tendencies.[1] Gnassingbé Eyadéma the dictator of Togo from 1967 to 2005 has been considered an example of tropical fascism in Africa.[2] The Hutu Power movement, a Hutu ultranationalist and supremacist movement that organized and committed the Rwandan Genocide aimed at exterminating the Tutsi people of Rwanda, has been regarded as a prominent example of tropical fascism in Africa.[3] The Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia has been called a tropical fascist regime, as they officially renounced communism in 1981.

Hutu Power (Rwanda)

The Hutu Power movement in Rwanda, a movement based on Hutu ultranationalism and Hutu supremacy over Tutsis, and the intention of extermination of the Tutsis, has been regarded as a fascist movement.[4][5]

See also

References

  1. ^ African geopolitics , Issues 17-20. OR.IMA International, 2005. Pp. 104.
  2. ^ African geopolitics , Issues 17-20. OR.IMA International, 2005. Pp. 104.
  3. ^ Pierre Hazan, Sarah De Stadelhofen. Judging war, judging history: behind truth and reconciliation. Stanford University Press, 2010. Pp. 143.
  4. ^ Africa research bulletin: Political, social, and cultural series, Volume 40. Blackwell, 2003. Pp. 5402.
  5. ^ Pierre Hazan, Sarah De Stadelhofen. Judging war, judging history: behind truth and reconciliation. Stanford University Press, 2010. Pp. 143.
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