Tornadoes of 2018

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Tornadoes of 2018
2018 United States tornado count.png
A chart of the 2018 United States tornado count
Timespan January 1 – Ongoing
Maximum rated tornado EF4 tornado
Tornadoes in U.S. 810
Fatalities (U.S.) 9
Fatalities (worldwide) 12

This page documents notable tornadoes and tornado outbreaks worldwide in 2018. Strong and destructive tornadoes form most frequently in the United States, Brazil, Bangladesh and Eastern India, but they can occur almost anywhere under the right conditions. Tornadoes also develop occasionally in southern Canada during the Northern Hemisphere's summer and somewhat regularly at other times of the year across Europe, Asia, and Australia. Tornadic events are often accompanied with other forms of severe weather, including strong thunderstorms, strong winds, and hail.

There have been 1,005 preliminary reports of tornadoes in the United States in 2018,[1] of which at least 808 have been confirmed. Twelve tornado-related deaths have been confirmed worldwide; nine in the United States,[2] two in Brazil and one in Canada. So far, the United States has seen below-average numbers of tornadoes, with near record low tornado amounts in the typical peak month of May. The only officially-rated violent tornado of the year so far occurred near the town of Alonsa, Manitoba on August 3; no tornadoes in the United States so far have been rated above EF3, making 2018 just the second year since record keeping began in 1950 to go along with 2005 that the United States has not had a violent (EF4-EF5) tornado touchdown through October 31.

Events

Fatal United States tornadoes in 2018
Tornadoes of 2018 is located in the US
Feb. 24
Feb. 24
Feb. 24
Feb. 24
Apr. 14
Apr. 14
Jul. 10
Jul. 10
Sep. 17
Sep. 17
Nov. 1
Nov. 1
Nov. 2
Nov. 2
Nov. 6
Nov. 6
Approximate touchdown location of killer tornadoes in 2018
Summary of tornadoes
  • February 24 – Kentucky (1 death)[2]
  • February 24 – Arkansas (1 death)[2]
  • April 14 - Louisiana (1 death)[3]
  • July 10 - North Dakota (1 death)[4]
  • September 17 - Virginia (1 death)[5]
  • November 1 - Mississippi (1 death)[6]
  • November 2 - Maryland (2 deaths)[7]
  • November 6 - Tennessee (1 death)[8]
Total Fatalities: 9


United States yearly total

Confirmed tornadoes by Enhanced Fujita rating
EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5 Total
74 358 310 58 10 0 0 810


January

16 tornadoes were reported in the United States in January,[1] of which 15 were confirmed.

January 1 (France)

FU F0 F1 F2 F3 F4 F5
0 1 1 2 0 0 0

Four tornadoes were reported in western France on January 1, including two strong EF2 tornadoes. The first tornado touched down and completely destroyed a wind turbine at EF2 strength near Bouin, in the region of Pays de la Loire.[9][10] The second tornado was a weak and brief EF0 tornado that hit Saint-Paul-Mont-Penit, again in Pays de la Loire. This tornado damaged an equestrian center, tossed a trampoline, downed trees, and damaged the roof of a school.[11] The third tornado was an EF1 tornado with a path damage about 5 kilometers long that hit to the south of Macau, in the region of Nouvelle-Aquitaine. The Macau area tornado caused considerable roof and structural damage to homes and businesses, and downed signs and fences along its path, with much of the damage occurring in the Lafont area.[12][13] The last tornado was an EF2 that hit Aize and nearby rural areas in the region of Centre-Val de Loire. Numerous large trees were snapped or uprooted, outbuildings were destroyed, and multiple homes sustained severe damage as a result of this strong tornado, including a few that had their roofs completely torn off.[14]


January 21–22

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
0 6 6 1 0 0 0

A small outbreak of 13 tornadoes impacted the Southern United States on January 21 and 22. On January 21, an EF1 tornado struck the town of Huntington, Arkansas, where trees were downed, a metal structure was destroyed, and a mobile home was damaged along with multiple chicken houses. An EF2 tornado caused significant damage as it clipped the eastern outskirts of De Kalb, Texas. The De Kalb tornado tore roofs off of homes, snapped and twisted numerous trees, damaged a church, and completely destroyed many large chicken houses along its path.[15] Weak tornado activity continued the following day. An EF1 tornado near Taylorsville, Mississippi destroyed sheds and barns, damaged homes, pushed a mobile home off of its foundation, snapped and uprooted many trees, and injured one person. Another EF1 tornado caused extensive roof damage to a church and multiple homes near Greenbrier, Arkansas. One injury and no fatalities occurred as a result of this outbreak.[16]

February

46 tornadoes were reported in the United States in February;[1] however, 51 were confirmed.

February 24

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
0 8 18 6 0 0 0
High-end EF2 damage to a two-story apartment complex in Hopkinsville, Kentucky.

On February 24, the Storm Prediction Center issued an enhanced risk of severe weather across much of the Lower Mississippi River Valley. This included a 10% hatched risk area for tornadoes. A mixed convective mode was predicted, with both bowing line segments and discrete supercell thunderstorms expected to develop in the threat area. Throughout the event, the development of isolated supcercell thunderstorms that was expected did not occur. However, a large quasi-linear convective system developed, and numerous semi-discrete supercell structures and embedded mesovortices within the larger line of severe storms produced a moderate outbreak of tornadoes. While most of these tornadoes were relatively brief, several of them were strong, resulting in major damage and fatalities.[17] A high-end EF2 tornado near Adairville, Kentucky destroyed several homes and barns and killed an elderly woman, ending a record 283-day streak without any tornado-related deaths.[18] Another high-end EF2 struck the southeast side of Hopkinsville, severely damaging multiple two-story apartment buildings and injuring nine people.[19][20] An EF1 tornado caused roof damage to many homes and businesses in Murray as well. In Arkansas, an EF1 tornado caused moderate damage to many structures in the town of Keiser and blew much of the roof off of a hotel near Osceola. An EF2 tornado near Knobel killed one person when a mobile home was thrown into a pond. The same tornado later crossed into Missouri and struck the town of Malden, where numerous homes were heavily damaged and several people were injured.[21] Also in Missouri, several homes in the town of Matthews had their roofs ripped off as the result of an EF2 tornado. Another EF2 tornado touched down in the eastern part of Clarksville, Tennessee as well, where several homes and duplexes were damaged or destroyed, and many vehicles and a few buildings were damaged at an industrial complex. A total of 30 tornadoes were confirmed as a result of this outbreak, which resulted in two fatalities and at least 20 injuries.[16]

March

62 tornadoes were reported in the United States in March,[1] of which at least 55 were confirmed.

March 12 (Italy)

FU F0 F1 F2 F3 F4 F5
0 0 0 1 0 0 0

During the overnight hours of March 12, a damaging F2 tornado moved through the southern portions of Caserta, Italy, injuring at least eight people. Well-built brick buildings had windows blown out and sustained some collapse of exterior masonry. Large business signs were toppled, and vehicles were thrown off of roads and severely damaged. Brick fences were blown over, large trees were downed, and multiple homes and apartment buildings were damaged as well.[22][23]

March 18–19

EF3 damage to a house in Nances Creek, Alabama, near Jacksonville.
SPC outlook with storm reports for March 19.
EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
0 6 10 4 1 0 0

On March 18, the Storm Prediction Center issued a slight risk for severe weather across much of the Southern United States. Scattered severe weather occurred, including an EF1 tornado that caused minor damage near the town of Glazier, Texas. The system pushed eastward on March 19, along with a highly unstable and sheared environment in place across portions of Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee. The SPC then issued a moderate risk for severe weather, including a 15% hatched risk area for tornadoes. Multiple strong tornadoes touched down that evening, including an EF2 that uprooted hundreds of trees and ripped roofs off of homes near Ardmore, Alabama. A high-end EF2 severely damaged or destroyed several homes near the town of Southside. The most significant tornado of the event was a damaging, long-tracked EF3 wedge tornado that struck Jacksonville, Alabama, where the Jacksonville State University campus and multiple apartment complexes sustained major damage. That same tornado also destroyed several houses and mobile homes in the small community of Nances Creek. In Russellville, an EF1 tornado caused minor damage to numerous homes and several businesses.[16] Further east in Georgia, an EF2 tornado touched down in the Atlanta suburb of South Fulton, damaging many homes in a subdivision. The supercell thunderstorms that produced the tornadoes during this event were very high-precipitation in nature, some of which even produced some very large hail; this included baseball to grapefruit-sized hailstones that fell across several counties in northern Alabama. One particularly massive hailstone found in Cullman County was measured at approximately 5.25 inches in peak width, had a circumference of 13.75 inches, and weighed 8.9 ounces; that made it the largest hailstone ever recorded in Alabama state history. No fatalities occurred during this outbreak, though seven people were injured. A total of 21 tornadoes were confirmed.[24]

April

146 tornadoes were reported in the United States in April,[1] of which at least 127 were confirmed.

April 3

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
0 5 14 3 0 0 0

On April 3, 2018, the Storm Prediction Center issued a moderate risk of severe weather throughout parts of the Midwest and Southern United States, including a 10% hatched risk area for tornadoes across much of the Ohio Valley. Multiple tornadoes occurred throughout the Midwest, causing damage in Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio, a few of which were strong. An EF1 tornado caused damage to farms near Xenia, Ohio on the 44th anniversary of the 1974 F5 Xenia Tornado, while another EF1 damaged homes and power poles in the Columbus suburb of Grove City.[25][26] Two EF2 tornadoes destroyed homes near the Illinois towns of Galatia and Vandalia. In Energy, Illinois, an EF1 tornado heavily damaged a couple of businesses. An EF2 tornado near Burna, Kentucky destroyed vehicles and twisted a home off of its foundation as well. Numerous reports of damaging straight-line winds and large hail were also received. 22 tornadoes were confirmed as a result of this outbreak.[16]

April 6–7

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
1 5 12 1 0 0 0

An area of low pressure pushed eastward from the Texas Panhandle into northwestern Louisiana on April 6. The Storm Prediction Center issued an enhanced risk of severe weather, including a 5% risk of tornadoes. Within the moist and unstable warm sector from eastern Texas into western Mississippi, severe thunderstorms developed and led to numerous reports of damaging winds and large hail, as well as several tornadoes.[27][28] Subsequent damage surveys confirmed 19 tornadoes from April 6 into April 7, most notably an EF2 wedge tornado near Coushatta, Louisiana that prompted a tornado emergency and destroyed several metal structures. Many trees and power poles were snapped as a result of this tornado as well. Three separate EF1 tornadoes also damaged several homes and downed many trees near DeRidder, Louisiana.[16]

April 13–15

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
0 21 40 10 1 0 0
EF3 damage to a house in Elon, Virginia. This home was not well-anchored to its foundation.

From the 13th to the 15th of April, a three-day outbreak of tornadoes impacted the Midwest, Deep South, and East Coast of the United States, several of which were strong. On April 13, the Storm Prediction Center issued a moderate risk of severe weather across parts of Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas, including a 15% hatched risk area for tornadoes. An enhanced risk of severe weather was issued for parts of Missouri and Iowa as well. Supercell thunderstorms developed and multiple tornadoes touched down in the threat area that evening, including an EF2 multiple-vortex wedge tornado that struck Mountainburg, Arkansas. This tornado tossed vehicles from roads, severely damaged multiple homes, and injured four people. A high-end EF2 ripped the roofs and exterior walls from a home near Norwood, Missouri as well.[29] Later that night and into the early morning hours of April 14, the storms merged into a large squall line and pushed eastward across parts of the Southern United States. An enhanced risk of severe weather was issued for parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, including a 10% risk of tornadoes. A large EF1 tornado moved through Shreveport, Bossier City, and Red Chute, Louisiana during the early morning hours and downed many trees, one of which fell onto a travel trailer and killed a child inside. An EF2 tornado near Bryceland destroyed barns and ripped much of the roof off of a home as well, while another EF2 near Carencro damaged homes and businesses along its path. An EF2 tornado near Portland, Arkansas also caused heavy damage. During the mid-morning hours, an EF2 tornado embedded in the squall line struck Meridian, Mississippi, causing significant damage to homes and apartment buildings.[30]

On April 15, an enhanced risk of severe weather was issued for parts of Virginia and the Carolinas, again including a 10% risk of tornadoes. Semi-discrete supercell structures embedded in the line produced strong tornadoes in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. One high-end EF2 tornado destroyed homes and businesses, and damaged an elementary school as it moved through populated areas of Greensboro, North Carolina, injuring ten people. An EF2 tornado near Gilbert, South Carolina caused severe damage to trees, power poles, and chicken houses. Another strong tornado heavily damaged businesses and flipped vehicles as it moved through the Lynchburg, Virginia area before striking Elon at EF3 strength. Many homes were badly damaged or destroyed in Elon, including several poorly anchored homes that were leveled and swept from their foundations. One person was killed as a result of this outbreak, and 29 others were injured. Seventy-two tornadoes were confirmed.[30]

April 22–23

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
0 7 4 0 0 0 0

Around 3:11 pm on April 22, an EF1 tornado struck Fort Walton Beach, Florida, damaging homes and apartment buildings. The tornado injured two people, and was caught on video by numerous locals and tourists. Several other weak tornadoes caused minor damage in the Southern United States, including an EF0 that flipped RVs and injured 3 people near Foley, Alabama.[31][32] Another EF0 caused minor damage at Fort Rucker, while an EF1 caused moderate damage to businesses and vehicles in Galliano, Louisiana. A total of 11 tornadoes were confirmed.[30]

May

166 tornadoes were reported in the United States in May,[1] of which at least 121 have been confirmed.

May 1–3

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
4 18 16 1 1 0 0
An overturned pickup truck that was thrown 300 yards by an EF3 tornado near Tescott, Kansas.

On May 1, the Storm Prediction Center issued a moderate risk of severe weather across much of Kansas, with a 10% hatched risk of tornadoes. Multiple tornadoes were reported, including a large EF3 wedge tornado that passed near Tescott, Kansas. This tornado destroyed a house and numerous outbuildings, tossed vehicles, and was documented by many storm chasers. The area of the Central Plains that was affected by the outbreak had been experiencing an unusually slow start to the tornado season, particularly in both Kansas and Oklahoma, the latter of which did not have a single recorded tornado during the first four months of 2018. A brief tornado in rural northeastern Oklahoma near the town of Buffalo, which touched down around 6:30 p.m. CDT that evening, set a record for the latest-observed first tornado in Oklahoma since state tornado records were first kept in 1950.[33][34] On May 2, the Storm Prediction Center issued another moderate risk of severe weather, again with a 10% hatched risk of tornadoes across Kansas and Oklahoma. While low-level shear was relatively weak, elevated CAPE values, steep lapse rates, and leftover outflow boundaries were previous storms were all present in the threat area. Due to these compensating factors, the possibility of a few significant tornadoes was noted. Although, the supercell thunderstorms that developed were mainly outflow-dominant in nature, and only isolated and mostly weak tornadoes occurred. One EF2 tornado did occur near Loveland, Oklahoma, however. Additional weak tornadoes occurred on May 3 before the event came to an end. A total of 40 tornadoes were confirmed as a result of this outbreak, none of which resulted in injuries or fatalities.[30]

May 14–15

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
2 5 11 3 0 0 0

A moderate two-day outbreak of tornadoes affected the Great Plains and Northeastern United States. Multiple tornadoes touched down in Kansas on May 14, including two strong EF2 tornadoes and an EF1 that occurred near Maple City. Many power poles and trees were downed by the tornadoes near Maple City, and one of the EF2 tornadoes rolled a manufactured home.[35] Numerous severe thunderstorms, including several tornadoes, impacted the Northeastern United States the following day. An EF2 tornado snapped many large trees and damaged businesses in Kent, New York. The towns of Oxford, Connecticut and Patterson, New York sustained minor damage from EF1 tornadoes as well. No tornado-related deaths or injuries occurred as a result of this outbreak, though five people in the Northeastern United States were killed by straight-line winds. A total of 21 tornadoes were confirmed.[36]

May 16 (Germany)

FU F0 F1 F2 F3 F4 F5
0 0 0 1 0 0 0

An F2 tornado in Germany hit areas in and around the small towns of Boisheim, Dilkrath, and Schellerbaum in the Viersen district of North Rhine-Westphalia. Homes sustained heavy roof damage along the path, fences were downed, and an RV camper was tossed. The most intense damage occurred in heavily forested areas, where a large, wide swath of trees was completely flattened. A weather data recording station located in the path of the tornado measured winds of 223 km/h (138 mph). The tornado was caught on video and photographed by many local residents. Two people were injured.[37][38][39]

June

166 tornadoes were reported in the United States in June,[1] of which at least 119 were confirmed.

June 1

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
6 1 2 1 1 0 0

Scattered tornadoes, a couple of which were strong, occurred across portions of the northern Great Plains, following the issuance of a moderate risk of severe weather by the Storm Prediction Center. This outlook included a 10% risk of tornadoes. An EF3 tornado caused major damage as it moved through a rural subdivision outside of Gillette, Wyoming, damaging or destroying multiple manufactured homes and tossing vehicles. A separate EF1 tornado caused moderate damage as it struck a residential area at the northern edge of Gillette, while another EF1 caused damage at a mine and a power plant to the north of town. A fourth EF0 rope tornado occurred west of town, causing no damage. An EF2 tornado caused significant damage near Oakdale, North Dakota as well. At least 11 tornadoes occurred as a result of this small outbreak, and two people were injured.[40][30]

June 6–8

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
0 7 1 1 1 0 0

During the evening hours of June 6, a low-precipitation supercell thunderstorm produced a photogenic and long-lived EF3 tornado near Laramie, Wyoming. The tornado remained over mostly open terrain, and was photographed and caught on video by many locals and storm chasers. Many wooden power poles and large metal power pylons were snapped along the path, and the ground was heavily scoured. The same supercell thunderstorm also produced an EF2 satellite tornado that caused significant damage to a house. A weak EF0 tornado was confirmed in Nebraska later that night. Multiple other weak tornadoes touched down across the northern Great Plains on June 7 and 8 as well. 10 tornadoes were confirmed, none of which caused any injuries or fatalities.[41][30]

June 12 (Brazil)

FU F0 F1 F2 F3 F4 F5
0 1 0 0 1 0 0

A strong F3 (listed as an F4 by some sources) intensity tornado on the Fujita scale, with winds of about 186 mph, passed through several municipalities in Rio Grande do Sul, causing two deaths and leaving behind thousands of damaged homes. Due to the intensity of the winds, at least three trucks traveling along the RS-463 highway, between the municipalities of Coxilha, and Tapejara, in the northern region of the state, were hurled off the roadway into adjacent fields. In the city of Agua Santa, the tornado destroyed at least 10 aviaries causing the death of more than 220 thousand chickens. Large agricultural buildings were destroyed, farm machinery was tossed, and large metal storage silos were destroyed as well. 24 communities were impacted by the tornado, and 2,630 homes were damaged or destroyed, a few of which were leveled. Some of the worst damage along the path of the tornado occurred in the Ciríaco area, where a man was found dead underneath his collapsed home. Countless trees and power poles were snapped along the path as well. An F0 tornado was also observed near Nova Conquista, a locality in the city of Chiapetta, but remained over open fields and caused no damage. In other locations in southern Brazil, the line of storms caused heavy rain accompanied by damaging winds and hail.[42][43]

June 13

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
1 1 1 2 0 0 0

During the evening hours of June 13, two strong EF2 tornadoes caused major damage in northeastern Pennsylvania.[30] The first tornado struck Franklin Township in Bradford County, where multiple homes were heavily damaged or destroyed, trailers were tossed, and many trees were snapped or uprooted. The second tornado was a damaging high-end EF2 that touched down in Wilkes-Barre, damaging or destroying numerous businesses, tossing vehicles, snapping power poles, and injuring 6 people. An EF1 tornado also downed many trees near Gallitzin, Pennsylvania. Farther south, an EF0 tornado caused minimal damage to a pumping station near Little Dixie, Arkansas as well, while another weak tornado remained over an open field near Canal Point, Florida, causing no damage.[44][45]

June 26–29

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
3 18 10 3 2 0 0
Large EF3 tornado near Capitol, Montana.

Following the issuance of an enhanced risk of severe weather by the Storm Prediction Center, multiple tornadoes occurred across portions of the Great Plains and Great Lakes regions on June 26. An EF1 tornado touched down in the northeastern suburbs of Louisville, Kentucky, downing trees onto homes and causing considerable damage to a few businesses. Another EF1 tornado caused mostly minor damage to buildings in downtown Manhattan, Illinois, while a destructive EF3 struck the town of Eureka, Kansas. 175 homes and businesses were damaged or destroyed in Eureka, and eight people were injured. A few weak tornadoes occurred on June 27 in parts of the Upper Ohio Valley before another wave of significant tornado activity affected the Northern Great Plains on June 28. This included a large EF3 tornado that touched down near Capitol, Montana passed near Camp Crook, South Dakota, destroying a home, outbuildings, and multiple pieces of farm machinery. Two EF2 tornadoes also caused damage near Camp Crook as well. A few additional tornadoes occurred across the same region on June 29, including an EF2 that touched down near Winger, Minnesota. An EF1 tornado in western South Dakota downed numerous trees at Spearfish Canyon as well. A total of 36 tornadoes were confirmed as a result of this outbreak.[30]

June 29 (Japan)

FU F0 F1 F2 F3 F4 F5
0 0 0 1 0 0 0

On June 29, a strong tornado touched down in Japan, striking the central Honshu city of Maibara, Shiga Prefecture. According to a Japan Meteorological Agency confirmed report, the tornado produced F2 level damage along its path. Roofs were ripped off of well-built homes, vehicles were damaged, windows were shattered, power poles were downed, and large amounts of scaffolding was destroyed at a construction site. A Maibara city government report confirmed that 38 houses were severely damaged, while 102 houses sustained minor damage. A total of eight people were injured by the tornado.[46]

July

96 tornadoes were reported in the United States in July,[1] of which at least 63 were confirmed.

July 10

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
1 0 0 1 0 0 0

During the late evening hours of July 10, a brief but strong tornado struck the Prairie View RV Park on the south side of Watford City, North Dakota. The tornado was embedded in a squall line that was moving through the area, and destroyed numerous RVs, trailers, manufactured homes, and other structures along its short path. The tornado killed one newborn baby and resulted in 28 other injuries, 9 of which were critical. In addition, a weak tornado briefly touched down near Pennsuco, Florida, causing no damage.[47][48]

July 19–20

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
1 15 6 2 2 0 0
EF3 damage to brick businesses in downtown Marshalltown, Iowa.

During the afternoon and evening of July 19, an outbreak of 15 tornadoes impacted Iowa, a few of which were strong and destructive. The outbreak was unusual due its late-season time of occurrence, and due to the fact that it was largely unexpected. The Storm Prediction Center had only issued a slight risk with a 2% tornado risk area in the region prior to the outbreak, however it was upgraded to 5% later in the day. An EF2 tornado struck the town of Bondurant, causing heavy damage to homes, while a simultaneous and nearly identical tornado caused EF2 tree and outbuilding damage to the north of town. A powerful EF3 tornado struck the east edge of Pella, injuring 7 people and causing major structural damage to large factory buildings at the Vermeer plant. Another damaging EF3 struck downtown Marshalltown, heavily damaging or destroying numerous homes, businesses, and a Lennox International plant, and injuring 22 people. Several other weak tornadoes also occurred, including an EF0 that caused minor tree and fence damage in Ankeny.[49]

On July 20, the Storm Prediction Center issued a moderate risk of severe weather across parts of Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Damaging winds were the main threat, though the outlook included a 10% risk of tornadoes. Several tornadoes touched down, though all were weak. One EF1 tornado caused considerable damage to homes and barns near Corydon, Indiana, while another EF1 downed trees and destroyed outbuildings in and around the town of Moonsville. 26 tornadoes occurred as a result of this outbreak, which resulted in 29 injuries.[30][50][51]

July 27–29

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
0 2 5 2 1 0 0

Throughout a three-day period in late July, scattered tornadoes occurred across portions of the western Great Plains states, a couple of which were strong. Four weak tornadoes touched down in Colorado on July 27, including an EF1 near Byers that tore much of the roof off of a house and flipped a UPS truck, injuring the driver. Further east, another EF1 tornado caused moderate damage to trees, homes, and an elementary school at Whitemarsh Island, Georgia.[52][53] On July 28, a powerful EF3 tornado moved through rural areas near Douglas, Wyoming, snapping power poles and causing major damage at a ranch in the area. Two EF2 tornadoes occurred in Colorado on July 29, including one that severely damaged the local airport in the town of Brush. 10 tornadoes were confirmed and one person was injured.[54]

August

82 tornadoes were reported in the United States in August,[1] of which at least 65 have been confirmed.

August 3 (Canada)

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
0 0 0 0 0 1 0

A violent EF4 tornado struck rural areas of Manitoba, Canada, on August 3 - the first violent tornado in North America in 2018 and the first violent tornado in Canada since an F5 struck Elie, Manitoba in 2007. The tornado first impacted areas near Alonsa and Silver Ridge, with multiple homes and mobile homes damaged or completely destroyed along this portion of the path. A couple of homes were leveled or swept away, with only the foundations left behind. Numerous vehicles, trailers, and tractors were thrown and destroyed as well. The tornado impacted Margaret Bruce Beach before dissipating over Lake Manitoba, where cabins were destroyed, RV campers and vehicles were thrown into the lake, and public restroom facility buildings were swept away with only the foundation slabs and bolted-down toilets left behind. Numerous trees were snapped, debarked, and denuded along the path, and aerial photography revealed a distinct ground scar left behind by the tornado. One person was killed near Alonsa, and two others sustained significant injuries. The tornado reached a width of 800 m (870 yd) and remained on the ground for at least 20 minutes.[55][56]

August 28

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
0 8 15 1 0 0 0

A moderate outbreak of mostly weak tornadoes occurred across the Great Lakes region of the United States during late afternoon and evening of August 28. A majority of these tornadoes touched down in Wisconsin, and were embedded within a line of severe thunderstorms that moved across the southern portion of the state. An EF1 tornado stuck community of Alto, destroying large outbuildings, damaging trees and power poles, and causing considerable damage to farmsteads in the area. Three separate EF1 tornadoes caused damage to barns, trees, and homes in and around South Byron. The strongest tornado of the event was an EF2 that touched down in Brownsville, snapping numerous large trees, destroying a large barn, and toppling a large communications tower to the ground outside of town. A separate EF1 tornado also impacted Brownsville simultaneously, damaging trees and power poles in town. A few additional tornadoes also occurred in Iowa and Michigan, including an EF1 that heavily damaged a house near West Branch, Michigan. In addition to the tornadoes, the severe thunderstorms produced numerous reports of significant straight-line wind damage across the region. Damage to trees and agriculture across southern Wisconsin was severe. A total of 24 tornadoes were confirmed, none of which resulted in any fatalities or injuries.[57][58]

September

111 tornadoes were reported in the United States in September,[1] of which at least 84 have been confirmed.

September 13–17

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
0 21 15 1 0 0 0

Hurricane Florence produced several tornadoes that impacted the states of North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia, most of which were weak. The deadliest tornado spawned by the hurricane was an EF2 tornado that struck the towns of Chesterfield, Virginia and Midlothian, Virginia. Many businesses, particularly on Hull Street in Midlothian, were damaged extensively. The tornado caused one death, who was a 60-year-old flooring warehouse employee when the building collapsed on top of him. Sixteen other people were injured, including fifteen warehouse employees. Several trees were reported to have fallen down, and one house was also reported to have been damaged by an EF0 tornado in Mecklenburg County, Virginia.[59]

September 21 (Canada)

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
0 0 4 1 1 0 0

A localized but damaging outbreak of tornadoes impacted eastern Ontario and southern Quebec on the afternoon of September 21 as tornadic supercells moved through the area. The National Capital Region of Canada incurred the most significant damage from the event. A high-end EF3 tornado damaged or destroyed hundreds of structures and vehicles, and injured numerous people as it struck Dunrobin, Ontario and Gatineau, Quebec. A high-end EF2 that moved through the Nepean area also caused significant damage to many homes, and downed numerous trees along its path. Four EF1 tornadoes were also confirmed, including one that struck Calabogie, Ontario. Another EF1 damaged homes and downed many trees in the Val-des-Bois, Quebec area. Multiple reports of hail and damaging straight-line winds were also received as a result of the storms, and 272,000 people were left without power. A total of six tornadoes were confirmed as a result of this small outbreak, and 30 people were injured, five critically.[60]

October

84 tornadoes have been reported in the United States in October;[1] however, 93 have been confirmed.

October 11 (Australia)

A severe spring storm outbreak in eastern Queensland, Australia resulted in one confirmed but possibly up to three tornadoes.[61] Several houses were badly damaged and many sheds and outbuildings destroyed when a tornado hit Tansey, north-west of Brisbane.[62] A possible tornado passed south-east of Kingaroy, damaging property at Coolabunia.[62] Straight-line winds and hail of up to 7 cm from the same storm caused extensive damage to fruit crops and livestock and injured 4 people. A third suspected but unconfirmed tornado occurred north of Gympie.[61] Damaging supercells were recorded from Dalby north to Blackwater during the event.[61]

October 31-November 2

EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5
0 8 32 7 0 0 0

November

38 tornadoes have been reported in the United States in November;[1] however, at least 50 have been confirmed.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Annual Severe Weather Report Summary 2018". Storm Prediction Center. 2018.
  2. ^ a b c "Annual U.S. Killer Tornado Statistics". Storm Prediction Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved April 14, 2018.
  3. ^ NWS Damage Survey For April 13 and April 14, 2018 Tornado Events (Report). Iowa Environmental Information. National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office in Shreveport, Louisiana. April 14, 2018. Retrieved April 14, 2018.
  4. ^ Watford City Area Tornado Rated EF-2 (Report). National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office in Bismarck, North Dakota. July 10, 2018. Retrieved July 11, 2018.
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  6. ^ NWS Damage Survey for November 1 2018 - Update #7 (Report). Iowa Environmental Mesonet. National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office in Jackson, Mississippi. November 2, 2018. Retrieved November 2, 2018.
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