Timeline of the presidency of Richard Nixon

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The presidency of Richard Nixon began on January 20, 1969 when Richard Nixon was inaugurated as President of the United States, and ended on August 9, 1974, when, in the face of almost certain impeachment and removal from office, he resigned the presidency (the first U.S. president ever to do so).

1969

January

  • January 20First inauguration of Richard Nixon. Nixon declared in his inaugural address, "The greatest honor that history can bestow is the title of peacemaker."[1] The Nixon Administration initiates Détente.
  • January 21 - Nixon states his intent to wake early and sleep late to a group of campaign workers. Nixon attends a ceremony for the swearing in of 81 White House staff members.[2]
  • January 22 - George W. Romney resigns as Governor of Michigan to be sworn in as the 3rd Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.[3]
  • January 28 - President Nixon speaks to members of the House rules committee and House leadership during a luncheon.[4]
  • January 31 - President Nixon visits an African-American neighborhood without announcement in Washington in the morning hours, traveling there for the purpose of witnessing a vest pocket park and playground under Romney's suggestion.[5]

February

  • February 2 - White House Urban Affairs Advisor Daniel Patrick Moynihan says solving problems in American cities will require "cold cash", suggesting a federal finance program for allowances of families and children.[6]
  • February 3 - The White House announces President Nixon's intent to visit numerous western European countries in the next two months.[7]
  • February 5 - President Nixon gives authorization to a ceiling raise on the National Science Foundation's expenditures by 10 million at multiple universities to help research among hardships caused by limitations in spending.[8]
  • February 6 - President Nixon says he wants promises from American commanders prior to agreement with South Vietnam leader Nguyen Van Thieu troop withdraw in Vietnam.[9]
  • February 8 - President Nixon directs Lee DuBridge for national space program examination and afterward have a possible cost reduction follow up report.[10]
  • February 10 - Ronald Ziegler says President Nixon will travel to West Berlin despite plans by East Germany to limit routes to the city on land due to the upcoming West German presidential election. President Nixon holds a White House state dining room dinner honoring Robert Menzies while he is visiting in Washington.[11]
  • February 11 - President Nixon blames the previous administration under former President Lyndon B. Johnson for allowing off shore drilling which caused the previous weeks' oil spillage in Santa Clara, California, at the same time announcing his directing of Lee DuBridge to bring about a group of scientists and engineers to form a plan on taking the most effective use of the federal government in cleaning the shoreline California and preventing such a pollution disaster from another occurrence.[12]
  • February 13 - President Nixon promises the federal government's aid in American city problems though insists assistance from the local government is the common problem solver for inner city issues during a ceremony at the White House for the swearing in of Walter E. Washington as Mayor of the District of Columbia.[13]
  • February 15 - Following rejecting a request by President Nixon to work full-time, part-time consultant to the president on consumer affairs Willie Mae Rogers quits.[14]
  • February 19 - In the night hours it is discovered that President Nixon will spend the most time with France's Charles de Gaulle of the five country leaders he will be meeting the following week.[15][16]
  • February 22 - Secretary of the Treasury Kennedy denies his remarks from a week prior have caused the market drop during an interview.[17]
  • February 24 - President Nixon announces the development of negotiations with the Soviet Union and the US's full cooperation with European allies during a speech to NATO.[18]
  • February 27 - President Nixon pledges allied safeguarding of Berlin will remain while touring West Berlin.[19]
  • February 28 - President Nixon and President of France Charles de Gaulle conduct a meeting on American-French relations in Paris.[20]

March

  • March 1 - Nixon concludes his discussions with de Gaulle and a spokesman for the latter says the meeting resulted in "very good results for relations between our two countries".[21]
  • March 2 - President Nixon returns to the US at Andrews Air Force Base during the evening.[22]
  • March 9 - President Nixon holds a two-hour meeting with White House aides on the subject of antiballistic missile system deployment at his beachfront villa in Key Biscayne, Florida.[23]
  • March 16 - President Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon attend a White House gathering of 350 dignitaries and friends.[24] Secretary of Commerce Stans states the possibility of having the Nixon administration halt price increases of excessive quality that could harm the American economy during an appearance on Face the Nation.[25]
  • March 19 - Secretary of Defense Laird says that he is not aware of a plan to reduce American troops from within South Vietnam while speaking to the Senate Armed Forces Committee.[26]
  • March 20 - Secretary of Defense Laird states the Nixon administration's modified Sentinel antiballistic missile system will defend the US "because it protects our deterrent."[27]
  • March 25 - In a meeting with Republican leaders, President Nixon promises to ask for an extension by one year of the tax surcharge by 10% and excise taxes on automobiles and communication during the following day. President Nixon says the progression toward peace in South Vietnam is held in the hands of private conversation during a National Association of Broadcasters luncheon.[28]
  • March 26 - President Nixon keeps his promise from the previous day and asks Congress for a year long 10% surtax and vows he will make major federal spending cuts to double the surplus of the budget.[29]
  • March 28 – Former President Dwight Eisenhower dies

April

  • April 1 - Secretary of Defense Laird says South Vietnam will see a reduction in the number of B-52 bomber sorties.[30]
  • April 2 - President Nixon is joined by former President Johnson in attending the burial of former President Eisenhower in Abilene, Kansas.[31]
  • April 3 - Secretary of Defense Laird says peace negotiations connected to Vietnam but from "outside" are proceeding and "signs of progress" have occurred.[32]
  • April 4 - On the anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., while on his way to a meeting in Florida, United States Secretary of Health and Human Services Robert Finch has a 45-minute conversation with Coretta Scott King in her home in Atlanta, Georgia at the request of President Nixon.[33]
  • April 7 - Secretary of State Rogers states the Nixon administration wants a troop withdrawal on both sides ahead of the end of the year during his first press conference.[34]
  • April 8 - President Nixon issues a statement declaring his intent to use over 200 million in rebuilding riot torn cities.[35]
  • April 28 - President Nixon sends a message to Congress for the creation of representation of the District of Columbia within the federal government.[36] President Nixon says a candidate's views on the antiballistic missile program would not be a factor in being confirmed for the position of Director of the National Science Foundation.[37] President Nixon telephones the attendees of the champagne breakfast celebrating the debuting daily newspaper Chicago Today.[38] President Nixon sends a letter to Charles de Gaulle addressing his resignation as President of France praising his tenure.[39]
  • April 29 - President Nixon encourages university administrators to stand up against protestors who engage in lawless dissent on campuses.[40] President Nixon plays piano for the 70th birthday celebration of Duke Ellington at the White House.[41]

May

  • May 2 - President Nixon asks Congress to allow three new legislative measures for the suppression of what the president claims is a record flooding of sexual content in mail to US homes.[42] President Nixon sends a special message to Congress regarding obscene and pornographic materials.[43]
  • May 3 - President Nixon visits former Governor of South Carolina James F. Byrnes to congratulate him on being married for 60 years and turning 90 years old.[44] White House sources say President Nixon would be willing to accept a private joint troop removal from Vietnam deal with Hanoi in the event that definite safeguards are imposed to ensure the pact would not be violated.[45]
  • May 4 - Secretary of Transportation Volpe rebukes students carrying firearms during a speech to thousands celebrating Polish Constitution Day.[46]
  • May 27 - President Nixon announces his choice of Charles A. Bane for the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit.[47]
  • May 28 - President Nixon requests of Congress the approval of a 2.6 billion foreign aid program channeling more private enterprise to overseas and focusing on technical help.[48]
  • May 31 - President Nixon has a meeting with Secretary of State Rogers on peace in Vietnam. Press aid Ronald Ziegler says the position of support for President Nixon's eight-point peace plan by Nguyen Van Thieu had not changed. After the meeting, the president and secretary of state join the Nixon family in a trip to the Bahamas.[49]

June

  • June 1 - President Nixon returns to Washington in the night hours.[50]
  • June 2 - Former Vice President Hubert Humphrey defends President Nixon against critics of his methods to end the war, saying he believes Nixon "wants peace and I think he's trying to find it."[51] President Nixon meets with Minister for Foreign Affairs Kiichi Aichi for a non-formal talk particularly in regards to Okinawa and issues of trade. The White House says the meeting is meant to serve as a preliminary for the upcoming meeting between President Nixon and Eisaku Sato.[52]
  • June 3 - President Nixon appears on the campus of General Beadle State College while there to dedicate a library housing the papers of Senator Karl Mundt, saying the US has the power to crush revolutionaries, who he defines as youngsters choosing to not partake in the process giving continuity to civilization.[53]
  • June 5 - Secretary of State Rogers holds a news conference where he asserts the South Vietnamese armed forces are willing and able to take more responsibilities in Vietnam.[54] Nixon announces his choice of Donald Johnson as the new head of the Veterans administration, introducing him in front of the Newporter inn's temporary office close to Newport Beach.[55]
  • June 6 - President Nixon orders $500,000 to the state of Illinois after damages caused to the state by a spring flood.[56]
  • June 8 - President Nixon meets with President of South Vietnam Nguyen Van Thieu at the Midway Island, during which President Nixon announces a scheduled withdrawal of 25,000 at the end of August.[57]
  • June 10 - President Nixon says North Vietnam will be the reason for a failing of peace if it continues to not act toward reciprocal moves in favor of ending conflict during an appearance on the South Lawn.[58] Secretary of the Treasury Kennedy says the US is close to runaway inflation during a press conference.[59] Deputy Defense Secretary Packard announces the cancellation of the manned orbiting laboratory (MOL) program.[60]
  • June 13 - The Department of Defense announces the 900 man battalion will be the first American unit brought back from Vietnam.[61]
  • June 28 - The White House announces President Nixon's plan to attend the Apollo 11 splashdown and subsequently travel to five Asian countries alongside communist Romania in an attempt to form a new US policy in Southeast Asia after the Vietnam War concludes.[62]
  • June 29 - CBS Radio states Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare Finch intends to notifying the American Medical Association of plans by the Nixon administration on limiting doctors' fees in Medicaid aid cases the following day.[63]

July

  • July 1 - Vice President Agnew places the blame for the uncompromising stance by the enemy on criticisms made toward the Nixon administration's policy in Vietnam during an address at the Midwestern Governors' Conference.[64]
  • July 2 - Secretary of State Rogers says it remains uncertain the US is being sent a peace sign by Hanoi despite admitting the decrease of enemy hostility in Vietnam during a press conference.[65] President Nixon arrives in Key Biscayne, Florida for the beginning of a vacation for the upcoming Independence Day.[66]
  • July 3 - The Nixon administration announces its choice to eliminate desegregating southern school deadlines and simultaneously promises "immediate and massive attention" toward undoing de facto segregation in large cities within other parts of the US.[67] President Nixon says the US wishes to begin discussing strategic arms limitations with the Soviet Union by "July 31 or shortly thereafter" while in Geneva, Switzerland.[68]
  • July 4 - President Nixon radios a praiseful message to a group of explorers crossing the Atlantic Ocean while in an Egyptian reed boat.[69]
  • July 5 - President Nixon announces the names of the US delegation to the discussion with Russia on strategic arm limitations.[70]
  • July 6 - President Nixon returns to Washington from his five-day vacation.[71]
  • July 7 - The White House announces President Nixon's addressing of medical cost increases in three days following a scheduled meeting with Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare Finch.[72]
  • July 8 - President Nixon meets with Representative Catherine May in the White House for discussions on the advancement of female equality.[73] President Nixon greets Emperor of Ethiopia Haile Selassie at the White House for the beginning of a four-day visit by the emperor.[74] President Nixon requests Congress extend the insurance of the unemployed to 4.8 million in a message to both chambers.[75]
  • July 10 - President Nixon praises the report on health care released earlier in the day by Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare Finch which he cites as leading to his realization on the seriousness of the errors in the national health field.[76] President Nixon announces his nominations of Talyor Belcher for United States Ambassador to Peru and Walter Rice for United States Ambassador to Australia.[77]
  • July 11 - Attorney General Mitchell requests that Congress allow potential dangerous persons to be imprisoned without bail for up to 60 days in a letter.[78] President Nixon meets with his former golf caddie Harold Bell at the White House.[79] The Pentagon discloses that it has began conducting open air tests for the purpose of identifying lethal nerve gas at three locations across the US.[80]
  • July 12 - Senate Democratic Leader Mike Mansfield claims President Nixon has privately ordered a reducing in pressure from the military in Vietnam as an attempt to dismiss Paris peace talks amid an interview.[81]
  • July 14 - Attorney General Mitchell announces the Nixon administration is doing less electronic surveillance than the administration of his direct predecessor Lyndon B. Johnson during a press conference.[82]
  • July 20Apollo 11 lands the first two humans, Americans Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, on the Moon. Nixon makes the longest long distance phone call in history.[83]
  • July 25 – The Nixon Doctrine (also known as the Guam Doctrine) is put forth during a press conference in Guam by President Nixon.[84] Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Romney calls for a nation dependent upon its people rather than government in remarks before 170 mayors from Illinois.[85]
  • July 26 - President Nixon says he is determined in finding a way toward swaying the Asian nations to take the lead in their collective defense while the US remains in a smaller and supportive role while in Manila.[86]
  • July 27 - President Nixon ends his discussions on the Asia-Pacific region's future with President of the Philippines Ferdinand Marcos.[87]

August

  • August 1 - Head of State of Cambodia Norodom Sihanouk formally invites President Nixon to pay an official visit to Cambodia the next time he takes a trip to Asia.[88]
  • August 2 - President Nixon leaves Pakistan and Asia.[89]
  • August 3 - Secretary of State Rogers says the US wants to improve relations with Red China by holding discussions during a press conference in Hong Kong.[90] President Nixon returns to Washington during the night hours.[91]
  • August 4 - National Security Advisor Kissinger meets with President of France Georges Pompidou in Paris during the afternoon.[92] The House votes 237 to 170 in approval of a bill extending the surcharge on income taxes by 10% until January 1.[93]
  • August 8 – Nixon gives his first major address on domestic policy, announcing plans for welfare reform and returning greater authority to state and local governments.[94] Secretary of State Rogers says the US will approach communist China to resume discussions of formality broken off by the Chinese the previous year during a meeting at the Australian National Press club.[95]
  • August 9 - President Nixon states his support for the Equal Employment Opportunity commission having the right to directly proceed to federal courts in combatting private employers having job discrimination.[96]
  • August 10 - Daniel Moynihan concedes that the Nixon administration has faced internal conflict over the proposed welfare reform during an appearance on Meet the Press.[97]
  • August 11 - President Nixon sends a message to Congress requesting a study of the various proposals made to reform the US welfare system and announces changes being made to the office of economic opportunity, the basic responsibility of the office of economic opportunity under the Nixon administration now being government social pioneering research and development.[98]
  • August 12 - President Nixon submits his manpower training proposals to Congress, the program meant to reduce unemployment.[99]
  • August 13 - President Nixon holds a dinner for Neil Armstrong, Edwin Aldrin, Jr., and Michael Collins.[100]
  • August 14 - The White House announces President Nixon remains unsure of whether to order a second contingent of withdrawal of American troops from South Vietnam.[101] Secretary of the Treasury Kennedy says inflation will cut the value of the dollar in 11 years.[102]
  • August 17 - Nixon travels to Palm Springs, California for a golf game during the latter hours of the day.[103]
  • August 18 - President Nixon announces his nomination of Clement Furman Haynsworth for Associate Justice on the Supreme Court to replace the vacancy left by Abe Fortas.[104]
  • August 19 - President Nixon declares Louisiana a major disaster area and directs Vice President Agnew and Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Romney to fly to New Orleans for the purpose of inspecting stricken areas via helicopter.[105]
  • August 20 - The World Council of Churches declares the US as needing to cease lack of communication with Cuba as well as cease its economic embargo during the evening.[106]
  • August 21 - Secretary of Defense Laird announces defense spending being cut by 1.5 billion and a 100,000 military personnel reduction in the upcoming fiscal year.[107]
  • August 22 - Secretary of the Navy Chafee lists 76 naval ships to be deactivated as a result of the Pentagon's spending cut of 3 billion.[108]
  • August 30 - Due to the damage in southern and western parts of Illinois started on June 29, President Nixon designates the state a major disaster area.[56]

September

  • September 1 - President Nixon delivers a speech at the 61st Annual National Governors Conference in Colorado Springs.[109]
  • September 2 - The National Governors Conference adopts a resolution in support of compulsory health insurance.[110] It is learned during the night hours, via a closed session with the governors in Colorado Springs, that the Nixon administration intends to slash funding for new construction projects by 75% to aid the war against inflation.[111]
  • September 3 - Federal highway administrator F. C. Turner confirms the Nixon administration is supporting of a bill allowing larger buses and trucks on the interstate highways during an appearance before a House public works subcommittee.[112]
  • September 4 - President Nixon orders an imminent federal government construction projects funding cut of 75% to rise private home building and that the cutback will persist "until conditions ease".[113]
  • September 5 - Senator Al Gore, Sr. charges the Nixon administration tax reform bill with "making it easy for people with very high incomes to pay very low taxes" during a Senate finance committee hearing.[114]
  • September 6 - Secretary of Defense Laird issues a temporary suspension of 700 million for army construction.[115]
  • September 7 - President Nixon issues a statement in praise of Senator Everett Dirksen.[116]
  • September 8 - President Nixon announces a celebration world tour by America's first men to walk the moon will begin either September 29 or September 30.[117]
  • September 9 - Nixon eulogizes Senator Dirksen after the arrival of Dirksen's body in Washington.[118]
  • September 10 - It is disclosed that Senator William Fulbright unsuccessfully called on President Nixon to send a US representative to the funeral of Chairman of the Central Committee of the Workers' Party of Vietnam Ho Chi Minh.[119]
  • September 11 - The White House announces President Nixon's intention to speak at the United Nations general assembly in New York the following Thursday.[120]
  • September 12 - President Nixon orders the resuming of air bombing in South Vietnam, the White House concurrently stating the purpose of the continuation was behind enemy offense harkening back to a pre-cease-fire level.[121] The United States Civil Rights commission charges the Nixon administration with walking back its stated intent to support desegregation in schools.[122]
  • September 18 - President Nixon delivers an address to the 24th Session of the General Assembly of the United Nations at the United Nations headquarters in New York during the morning.[123]
  • September 19 - President Nixon holds a news briefing, in which he unveils plans to change previous draft calls throughout the final months of the year and pending legislation relating to drafting, in the Roosevelt Room during the morning.[124]
  • September 20 - President Nixon delivers an address to Association of Student Governments members in the Roosevelt Room during the afternoon.[125]
  • September 22 - President Nixon issues a statement concernin the Construction Industry Collective Bargaining Commission.[126]
  • September 23 - President Nixon announces his choice to continue supersonic transport development in a speech in the Roosevelt Room during the morning.[127]
  • September 24 - President Nixon issues a statement on the District of Columbia subway station.[128]
  • September 26 - President Nixon predicts Haynsworth will be confirmed by the Senate to the Supreme Court during a press conference.[129] President Nixon says unjust wage and price increases being asked for by the labor and management groups will result in them being priced "out of the market".[130] President Nixon says the Vietnam War could end sooner if unity across the US occurs in response to criticisms of his foreign policy.[131] President Nixon delivers an address concerning the leaving of Prime Minister of Israel Golda Meir in the Roosevelt Room in which he reflects on their discussions during the afternoon.[132]
  • September 29 - The White House says President Nixon's choices on withdrawals of troops from Vietnam War will be permitted based on upcoming circumstances unforeseeable.[133] Secretary of the Army Resor announces his ordering of charges of murder against Green Berets in Vietnam be dismissed immediately and the "men will be assigned to duties outside" of Vietnam.[134]

October

  • October 1 - The Justice Department requests the Supreme Court to strike against a lower court decision in favor of Chicago denizens being able to pursue allegations that the House committee on un-American activities.[135]
  • October 2 - The White House reports President Nixon as remaining committed to the nomination of Haynsworth to the Supreme Court amid claims the latter asked for a withdrawal of his name. Haynsworth denies asking Nixon to withdraw his name during the evening.[136]
  • October 3 - President Nixon creates an emergency board to investigate the threatened walkouts against six US railroad systems.[137] Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare Finch says the Nixon administration is developing a community college program to assist "forgotten Americans" during an address to the American Association of Junior Colleges.[138]
  • October 6 - President Nixon announces his appointing of a task force of 16 members meant to study dilemmas in education.[139]
  • October 7 - Secretary of Defense Laird says the Nixon administration has begun the pursuit of what he calls a dual course to withdraw the American military from Vietnam during a speech to the annual convention of the AFL-CIO.[140]
  • October 8 - Consumer Advisor to the President Virginia Knauer says the administration's anti-inflation policies are causing a decrease in the cost of meat.[141]
  • October 10 - President Nixon announces Director of Selective Service Lewis B. Hershey will be replaced during the upcoming February.[142]
  • October 11 - President Nixon sends a special message to Congress calling for a bipartisan effort on enacting the legislative program of his administration.[143] Secretary of the Interior Hickel says he ordered the change in the official seal of the Interior Department due to large opposition within the department and public.[144]
  • October 12 - Secretary of State Rogers reports President Nixon as having made "tremendous progress" within his effort to deescalate Vietnam during a television interview.[145]
  • October 13 - The White House announces a November 3 radio and television broadcast of President Nixon giving a situation report on Vietnam.[146] United States Secretary of the Army Stanley Rogers Resor calls on army commanders to pay attention to race relations within the army with sensitivity during a speech to the Association of the United States Army.[147]
  • October 14 - Vice President Agnew calls on members of Congress as well as sponsors of protesters to repudiate a letter by North Korea Prime Minister Phạm Văn Đồng wishing success to the protestors.[148] President Nixon attends a service commemorating what would have been the 79th birthday of the late former President Eisenhower.[149]
  • October 15 - The Department of Defense announces the names of ten casualties in the Vietnam conflict.[150]
  • October 16 - The White House announces President Nixon will discuss price inflation and the high living costs in a nationwide radio broadcast during the afternoon of the following day.[151] Secretary of Defense Laird says his budget will have the Defense Department keep several thousand men in Vietnam during a Pentagon press conference.[152]
  • October 17 - President Nixon delivers a national address from the White House on inflation and the high cost of living.[153] President Nixon announces his nomination of Arthur Burns for Chairman of the Federal Reserve Board.[154]
  • October 20 - President Nixon defends Haynsworth as being the subject of "vicious character assassination" during a press conference.[155] The Nixon administration proposes possession of narcotics for the purpose of personal usage be changed from a misdemeanor to a felony.[156]
  • October 21 - President Nixon meets with Russian cosmonauts Georgej T. Beregovoi and Konstantin Feoktistov at the White House on the second day of the two week tour by the duo across the US.[157]
  • October 22 - Secretary of Defense Laird announces his opposition to a proposal by Senator Hugh Scott calling on President Nixon to set a date in for a Vietnam unilateral ceasefire while speaking to reporters.[158] The Senate votes 49 to 24 in favor of liberalizing trade with the Soviet Union as well as its affiliates.[159]
  • October 23 - Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Romney speaks on the possibility of income tax deductions assigned to home mortgage interest being reduced and used for the rebuilding of US slums while speaking at the dedication of the Federal National Mortgage association headquarters.[160]

November

  • November 1 - Sources disclose a document in the high command of the Viet Cong stating the plan by President Nixon to gradually withdraw from Vietnam is doomed.[161]
  • November 2 - Attorney General Mitchell states the intent of the Justice Department to carry out the a mandate by the Supreme Court to immediately desegregate southern schools during an appearance on Meet the Press.[162]
  • November 3 - President Nixon delivers a televised evening address on the subject of the Vietnam War in his White House office.[163]
  • November 4 - President Nixon issues a statement on the National Program for Voluntary Action.[164]
  • November 5 - President Nixon makes a joint North Lawn appearance with First Lady Nixon, Vice President Agnew, Judy Agnew, Governor-elect of New Jersey William T. Cahill, and Governor-elect of Virginia Linwood Holton during the afternoon.[165]
  • November 12 - Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare Finch states an interest in having DDT be cut down over the course of two year during a press conference.[166]
  • November 19 - President Nixon meets with Prime Minister of Japan Eisaku Sato in the Oval Office for discussions on negotiating a return of Okinawa to Japan.[167]
  • November 20 - President Nixon accepts the resignation of Henry Cabot Lodge for the American delegation heading to the Vietnam peace negotiations.[168]
  • November 21 - The US agrees to return Okinawa to Japan after 24 years of ownership.[169] The Senate votes 55 to 45 in a rejection of Haynsworth for the Supreme Court.[170]
  • November 22 - President Nixon pledges to assist Illinois Republicans in the 1970 midterm elections as a payback for assistance with his presidential campaign the previous year.[171]
  • November 24 - President Nixon and Secretary of State Rogers sign the nuclear nonproliferation treaty to cause ratifications to the American pact of the agreement.[172] Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler says President Nixon will make an important announcement the following day without disclosing the nature of the revelation.[173]

December

  • December 1 - The Senate votes for a two and a half percent decrease in oil tax depletion from the present twenty-seven and a half, bring the total to 25%.[174]
  • December 2 - The House votes 333 to 55 in favor of President Nixon's peace resolution in Vietnam during the evening.[175]
  • December 9 – President Nixon instructs Secretary of State William Rogers to formulate the Rogers Plan, a framework to achieve an end to belligerence in the Arab–Israeli conflict following the Six-Day War and the continuing War of Attrition.[176][177]
  • December 11 - The White House accepts a voting rights proposal giving coverage to all 50 states.[178]
  • December 12 - Vice President Agnew claims the Nixon administration is being jeopardized in its efforts to curb inflation by a tax reform bill in the Senate that he calls "irresponsible tinkering" during a speech at the winter conference of the Republican Governors association.[179]
  • December 13 - State Department spokesman Elliot L. Richardson during a press conference confirms the US will give 1.2 million USD to Latin America even if Congress makes cuts to foreign aid.[180]
  • December 14 - The White House announces President Nixon will make a national report on Vietnam the following day on television and radio.[181]
  • December 15 - President Nixon announces the withdrawal of 50,000 American troops in Vietnam over the course of the next four months during a television and radio address.[182] The US and Soviet Union hold their ninth preliminary strategic arms discussions at the US embassy in Helsinki, Finland.[183] The Senate votes 85 to 4 in approval an appropriations bill for the fiscal year of 1970 of 69.3 billion.[184]
  • December 16 - President Nixon lights the national Christmas tree during the evening.[185] Secretary of Defense Laird says the planned withdrawal of 50,000 men from Vietnam will cut the following year's draft by 25,000 during a press conference at the Pentagon.[186]
  • December 18 - US spokesman Steven Ledogar says negotiations have already been downgraded by Hanoi, who he charges as not taking the discussions seriously, and North Korea chief delegate boycotts will not make a "difference".[187] President Nixon announces his intention to veto a money bill he claims is inflammatory in a letter arriving on Capitol Hill during the evening.[188]
  • December 20 - President Nixon meets with Republican congressional leaders for discussions on tax reform.[189] Labor Secretary Shultz charges lobbying on the part of both building trades and AFL-CIO with attempting to block "skilled and high paying jobs" for black Americans and other minorities.[190]
  • December 28 - United Nations Undersecretary Ralph Bunche says the Nixon administration does not have the confidence of black Americans in being convincing as trying to make gains in racial equality during an interview.[191]
  • December 29 - The White House announces President Nixon will make progression on a tax reform bill that also increases Social Security benefits by 15% before leaving for a vacation in California.[192]
  • December 30 - President Nixon signs a tax reform bill into law, critiquing measures of the bill in an accompanying statement.[193] President Nixon arrives in San Clemente, California and announces his intent to change his voting residence to the state instead of the current New York.[194]

1970

US Oil Production.

US Oil production peaks in 1970.

January

  • January 1 – Nixon signs the National Environmental Policy Act.
  • January 3 - Vice President Spiro Agnew says the US is warning other countries about treaty obligations made in Asia and that his country intends to follow its pledge while speaking to newsmen.[195] President Nixon finishes the fiscal 1971 federal budget and meets with Budget Director Robert Mayo.[196]
  • January 4 - Vice President Agnew meets with Prime Minister of Thailand Thanom Kittikachorn in Thailand.[197]
  • January 8 - The State Department announces the US and China are going to resume ambassadorial level meetings the upcoming January 20.[198]
  • January 9 - A gathering of over 200 protestors outside the White House cancels a birthday celebration for President Nixon.[199]
  • January 10 - United States Secretary of Labor George P. Shultz tells newsmen that labor department studies over the course of 1963, 1965, and 1969 as support for his theory that major strikes are not as economically harmful as believed.[200]
  • January 11 - The White House announces the intent of President Nixon to assist with relief efforts towards Biafrans.[201]
  • January 12 - President Nixon's appointment of Jerome H. Holland for United States Ambassador to Sweden is announced.[202]
  • January 14 - The State Department discloses that General Yakubu Gowon has praised American relief efforts within his country.[203] The White House announces President Nixon's ordering of additional cuts in the 1971 budget in an effort to prevent inflation.[204]
  • January 15 - The White House announces the negotiation of future airport construction being the result of an agreement between the state government and respective county in southern Florida.[205] Secretary of Defense Laird announces the reduction of American military strength by 300,000 troops by the following June while speaking to the California State Chamber of Commerce.[206]
  • January 16 - Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler says the tight fiscal policies of the Nixon administration will continue into the fiscal policy for the following year.[207]
  • January 17 - Vice President Agnew tells newsmen that he conveyed the Nixon doctrine within Asia during his trip.[208] Secretary of State Rogers says he wishes for impeding discussions between the US and Red China will ease relations for exchanges of both visitors and trades during an interview.[209]
  • January 18 - United States Attorney General John Mitchell announces 236 million dollars will be used by the law enforcement administration to provide grants to states and cites in the year's fiscal budget.[210] Vice President Agnew holds a breakfast meeting with United States Forces in Pacific Commander in Chief John S. McCain, Jr. at the Kahala Hilton hotel in Honolulu.[211]
  • January 19 - Press Secretary Ziegler announces President Nixon's nomination of G. Harrold Carswell for the United States Supreme Court.[212]
  • January 20 - The Senate votes 74 to 17 in favor of a 19.7 billion dollar money bill for the Labor and Health, Education, and Welfare Departments.[213] Secretary of Labor Shultz announces his support for a Chicago, Illinois program to assist in increasing black employment.[214]
  • January 22 - President Nixon delivers his 1970 State of the Union address.[215]
  • January 23 - The Senate votes 73 to 1 in favor of an anti-crime bill promoted by the Nixon administration that incorporates Nixon's policies on handcuffing crime.[216]
  • January 25 - A message by President Nixon, in which the latter states the US would supply Israel with arms when growing concerns continue, is read during a Jewish conference.[217]
  • January 26 - President Nixon vetoes the Senate approved 19.7 billion dollar money bill during a televised appearance in the evening.[218]
  • January 27 - President Nixon meets with Prime Minister of Britain Harold Wilson at the White House.[219]
  • January 28 - The House sustains President Nixon's veto of the money bill.[220]
  • January 29 - The Nixon administration dismisses the possibility of a resuming of American bombing on North Vietnam as a result of the American fighter bombers attacking a base of communist anti-aircraft affiliation.[221]
  • January 30 - Vice President Agnew declares he will no longer critique television broadcasters and rebukes Baltimore newspapers during a testimonial to newsmen in Essex, Maryland.[222]
  • January 31 - Press Secretary Ziegler denies President Nixon was involved with the installation of a helicopter landing pad in Key Biscayne.[223]

February

  • February 1 - Vice President Agnew discloses an upcoming formation of a cabinet group to address desegregation court orders on southern school districts during an appearance on Face the Nation.[224]
  • February 2 - President Nixon's federal budget for 1971 is released to Congress.[225]
  • February 3 - Vice President Agnew denounces charges against the Nixon administration of promoting euphoria on Vietnam while speaking to newsmen.[226] President Nixon sends a letter to Speaker John McCormack calling on Congress to compromise with him by composing an appropriation bill for health and education.[227]
  • February 4 - President Nixon issues an executive order demanding federal facilities cease the usage of air and water polluting operations within the next three years.[228]
  • February 5 - President Nixon holds a meeting with city mayors discussing law enforcement and the usage of federal and local authorities in combatting crime.[229]
Nixon shakes hands with Mayor of Chicago Richard Daley, 6 February 1970

March

  • March 2 - President Nixon attends a dinner honoring French President Pompidou at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York City during the evening.[237]
  • March 3 - President Nixon submits a special message to Congress calling for education reform.[238] President Nixon issues Executive Order 11513, establishing the President's Commission on School Finance.[239]
  • March 4 - President Nixon transmits to Congress the annual report on the Foreign Assistance Program.[240]
  • March 5 - President Nixon signs Executive Order 11514 into law.[241] President Nixon delivers an address at a ceremony following signing the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons in the International Conference Room at the Department of State during the morning.[242]

April

  • April 1 - President Nixon denounces charges of racism against Carswell and accuses the opposition of trying to stop the nomination so they can fill the vacancy on the court with individuals sharing their same ideology.[243]
  • April 2 - Labor Secretary Shultz admits to seeing no solution in the dispute between railroad and shopcraft unions other than the enactment of a compulsory solution.[244]
  • April 3 - President Nixon sends a special message to Congress requesting the first class postage rate be increased to 10 cents per letter as part of a pledge to increase postal worker wages by 14%.[245]
Nixon and the Duchess and Duke of Windsor, April 4, 1970
  • April 4 - President Nixon attends a party for the Duchess of Windsor Wallis Simpson and Duke Edward VIII.[246]
  • April 5 - President Nixon attends a sermon of worship for John Cardinal Krol at the White House.[247]
  • April 7 - United States Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare Robert H. Finch says the intent of the Nixon administration is to aim for desegregating faculty during a press conference.[248] President Nixon presents the Medal of Honor to the families of twenty-one soldiers killed in the Vietnam War during a ceremony in the East Room.[249]
  • April 8 - The Senate votes 51 to 45 in disapproval of the nomination of G. Harrold Carswell to the Supreme Court.[250]
  • April 9 - President Nixon announces the next judge he nominates for the Supreme Court will not hail from the Southern United States and the next nomination would be soon.[251]
  • April 10–11 - President Nixon meets with Chancellor of West Germany Willy Brandt for discussions in Washington.[252]
  • April 13 - President Nixon signs into law a bill authorizing over 24 billion dollars for both elementary and secondary education over the following three years.[253]
  • April 14 - President Nixon announces his nomination of Harry A. Blackmun for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.[254]
  • April 15 - President Nixon requests Congress authorize a ban of dumping polluted materials in the Great Lakes.[255] The White House announces a postponing of President Nixon's national televised address on the Vietnam War scheduled for the following day to during the early part of the upcoming week.[256]
  • April 16 - The House votes 243 to 155 in favor of President Nixon's welfare reform bill.[257]
  • April 17 - President Nixon announces that he will fly to Hawaii to present the crew of Apollo 13 with the Medal of Freedom.[258]
  • April 18 - President Nixon presents the Apollo 13 crew with Medals of Freedom at the Honolulu International Airport.[259]
  • April 20 - President Nixon announces the withdrawal of 150,000 troops from Vietnam by the following spring during a televised national address.[260]
  • April 28 - The Defense Department reports on the launch of Red China's first earthquake orbiting satellite.[261]
  • April 29 – The Cambodian Campaign is launched, a series of military operations conducted in eastern Cambodia by the United States and South Vietnam.

July

  • July 4 - President Nixon holds a meeting with David K. E. Bruce during the morning and afternoon discussing diplomacy.[262] American officials confirm a meeting between President of the Republic of Vietnam Nguyễn Văn Thiệu and Secretary of State Rogers failed to produce a joint peace resolution to introduce at the Paris talks.[263]

October

  • October 1 - President Nixon holds a six-hour meeting with President of Yugoslavia Josip Broz Tito in Belgrade, Yugoslavia.[264] President Nixon states his interest in learning about Yugoslavia during remarks at the Serbian Council Building in Belgrade during the evening.[265]
  • October 2 - President Nixon delivers an address at Barajas Airport[266] and receives the key to the city of Madrid[267] during the afternoon.
  • October 3 - President Nixon gives a speech on leaving Spain as well as both the historic and personal value of traveling there at the Barajas Airport during the morning.[268]
  • October 4 - President Nixon meets with David Bruce and Philip Habib during the Paris peace talks.[269]
  • October 5 - President Nixon comments that he believes his trip to Europe has greatly aided in securing a generation of peace.[270] President Nixon visits the graves of his ancestors during a ceremony in Dublin, Ireland.[271]
  • October 6 - President Nixon announces his intention to announce a new peace plan for ending the Vietnam War during a televised address scheduled for the following day and says the remarks will be his most comprehensive discussion of Southeast Asia while meeting with reporters.[272] The White House announces President Nixon's address to the United Nations General Assembly on October 23.[273]
  • October 8 - President Nixon said opposition to his Vietnam peace plan by domestic politicians has aided the hopes of North Vietnamese leaders while in Savannah, Georgia.[274]
  • October 14 - The White House announces President Nixon will spend two days giving speeches and attending rallies in Ohio, North Dakota, Missouri, Tennessee, and Indiana in aid of Republican candidates for the midterm elections in two and half weeks.[275]
  • October 15 - President Nixon signs the Organized Crime Control Act into law.[276]
  • October 16 - Secretary of State Rogers holds a four-hour conference with Soviet Union Minister of Foreign Affairs Andrei Gromyko.[277]
  • October 19 - Vice President Agnew endorses the reelection bid of Senator Ralph Smith during an evening speech in Chicago, Illinois.[278]
  • October 20 - President Nixon offers an endorsement of Congressman Richard L. Roudebush for the United States Senate during an appearance in Fort Wayne, Indiana in the evening.[279]
Nixon meets Prime Minister of Laos Souvanna Phouma in the Oval Office, 21 October 1970
  • October 22 - President Nixon meets with Soviet Union Minister of Foreign Affiars Gromyko at the White House for a wide-ranging discussion.[280]
  • October 23 - President Nixon delivers an address calling for peace with the Soviet Union to the 25th commemorative session of the United Nations General Assembly.[281]
  • October 26 - Vice President Agnew pledges the Nixon administration will appoint a southerner to the Supreme Court, support the south against neighborhood schools, and protect the textile nature of the part of the US while in Raleigh, North Carolina.[282]
  • October 28 - President Nixon delivers an address at the Market Hall Convention Center in Dallas, Texas during the evening.[283]
  • October 29 - President Nixon speaks briefly at the Mayo Civic Auditorium in Rochester, Minnesota during the afternoon.[284]
  • October 30 - President Nixon issues Proclamation 4020, designating the upcoming November 25 as "World Law Day".[285]
  • October 31 - President Nixon gives a speech on crime and violence at the Sky Harbor Airport in Phoenix, Arizona during the morning.[286]

November

Nixon walking out to Marine One in the rain, 1 November 1970
  • November 1 - Vice President Agnew condemns Democrats for lying as the presidential election approaches.[287]
  • November 4 - President Nixon states his pleasure with the new Republican majority in the Senate while speaking to reporters.[288]
  • November 6 - President Nixon announces his appointing of William D. Ruckelshaus for Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency.[289]
  • November 8 - President Nixon meets with Conservative Party leaders Kieran O'Doherty and J. Daniel Mahoney and William F. Buckley, Jr. in Grand Cay Island.[290]
  • November 10 - The White House announces President Nixon will pay a call to French President Pompidou amid his overnight stay in Paris.[291]
  • November 12 - President Nixon holds his first meeting with Nikolai Podgorny and French President Pompidou.[292]
  • November 13 - President Nixon meets with President-elect of Mexico Luis Echeverría for a discussion on problems mutually impacting the US and Mexico.[293]
  • November 17 - President Nixon delivers a speech at Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania during the evening.[294]
  • November 20 - President Nixon meets with Chairman of the Federal Reserve Board Arthur Burns.[295]
  • November 21 - Defense Secretary Laird denies reports by Radio Hanoi of a prisoner of war camp being hit as well as American flies being wounded earlier in the south panhandle of North Vietnam.[296]
  • November 23 - Defense Secretary Laird discloses details on a volunteer force around Hanoi.[297] President Nixon's veto on a spending limiting bill on candidates running for office attempting to use radio and television in a vote of 58 to 34.[298]
  • November 24 - Defense Secretary Laird declares retribution will be conducted in the event of American prisoners of war being punished by the North Vietnamese after a raid on a prisoner compound.[299] President Nixon issues Executive Order 11569, implemented for imposing regulations on the Selective Service.[300] President Nixon delivers an endorsement of James Oates heading the Jobs for Veterans Program in the Briefing Room of the White House during the morning.[301]
  • November 30 - President Nixon orders an investigation into a Lithuanian seaman returning to Russian authorities after an unsuccessful attempt at defecting to an American Coast Guard during the previous week.[302]

December

  • December 1 - National Security Advisor Kissinger is learned to have been the subject of an antiwar kidnapping plot.[303]
  • December 2 - The Senate votes 77 to 0 in favor of prohibition commercial airplanes from flying at super speeds over the US alongside the implementations of noise restrictions.[304]
  • December 3 - Secretary of State Rogers delivers a pledge by President Nixon to not reduce American troops in the European continent until East European Communists agree to do so for their own soldiers first.[305]
  • December 4 - President Nixon pledges an increase in the supply of crude oil in an attempt to curb gas and oil price increases during a speech in New York.[306]
  • December 5 - President Nixon criticizes members of the Senate for their scuffling over the supersonic transport airplane.[307]
  • December 8 - President Nixon issues Executive Order 11571, designating "the Commissioner of the District of Columbia as the Authority to carry out the provisions of" the District of Columbia Alley Dwelling Act.[308]
  • December 9 - President Nixon announces the resignation of White House counselor Bryce Harlow.[309]
  • December 10 - Secretary of State Rogers says the Nixon administration is not intending to send American troops into Cambodia while speaking to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.[310] President Nixon announces that he will order an air bombing of North Vietnam strategic targets in the event that the Hanoi government build a military buildup in South Vietnam and threatens American troops there.[311] President Nixon announces the appointing of Donald Rumsfield for Presidential counselor during a press conference.[312]
  • December 11 - Vice President Agnew's aides confirm his intention to attend the Republican Governors' Conference in Sun Valley, Idaho.[313]
  • December 13 - President Nixon calls on the Senate to use the last few days of the current session to enact the Family Assistance Plan during a speech at the White House Conference on Children.[314] Defense Secretary Laird says prisoners of American nationality in North Vietnam must be released before the completion of Vietnamizaton of the war.[315]
  • December 14 - President Nixon announces the resignation of David Kennedy as Treasury Secretary.[316] Vice President Agnew says Democrats in Congress are anticipated to work with President Nixon in solving economic issues within the US during the evening.[317]
  • December 16 - President Nixon threatens causing a special meeting if Congress adjourns without address issues he dubs as vital legislation.[318]
  • December 18 - The State Department states Americans should avoid traveling to Poland as a result of recent disturbances.[319]
  • December 21 - The Senate votes 48 to 35 in favor of sustaining President Nixon's veto of the Employment and Manpower bill.[320]
  • December 22 - President Nixon signs the Department of Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriation Act[321] and signs Proclamation 4025, a revision effecting imports.[322]
  • December 23 - President Nixon issues Executive Order 11574, amending the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.[323]
  • December 24 - President Nixon releases a Christmas Eve statement calling for peace.[324]
  • December 29 - Congress sends a 6.66 billion defense appropriation bill to President Nixon after the House and Senate votes in favor of it.[325]
  • December 30 - President Nixon has his annual physical examination at Bethesda Naval Hospital.[326] Deputy Defense Secretary David Packard suggests Lockheed Aircraft Corporation concede a 200 million loss on the contract proposing the construction of C-5A cargo plane in an attempt to avoid bankruptcy.[327]

1971

  • January 1 - President Nixon spends New Year's Day at Camp David with his family and aides.[328]
  • January 2 - The White House releases the text of a message sent to Congress by President Nixon the previous day alongside his vetoing of a bill raising the pay for roughly 850,000 federal workers.[329]
  • March 24 - In a 51-46 vote, the Senate cuts off government funding for the Nixon-supported supersonic transport airplane.[330]
  • June 13The New York Times begins publishing excerpts from the Pentagon Papers.[331]
  • July 15 – Nixon announces that he had been invited to China.[332]
  • November 3 - Secretary of Defense Laird meets with top American officials based in Saigon on intentions to send thousands of GIs back to the US during the holiday season.[333]
  • November 8 - The White House states its interest in the imposition of revisions made to a water pollution control bill sponsored by Senator Edmund Muskie.[334]
  • November 16 - Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare Richardson discloses that the Nixon administration is looking into reforming the Social Security accounting system.[335] The Senate votes 53 to 29 in favor of President Nixon having the authority to impose a 15% surcharge on imports into the US.[336] Secretary of the Treasury Connally lauds the wage-price increase as successful and foresees post-freeze controls cutting inflation in half during the following year.[337]
  • December 2 - Earl Butz is sworn in as the 18th United States Secretary of Agriculture.[338]
  • December 9 - President Nixon vetoes a federal childcare program that he charges as too costly and unworkable.[339] Congress sends a tax cut bill to President Nixon reducing the taxes on individuals and businesses by 15.8 billion USD during the night.[340]
  • December 10 - President Nixon signs a tax bill, cutting consumer and business taxes by 15.8 billion over the following three years, into law.[341] William Rehnquist is confirmed to the United States Supreme Court by a Senate vote of 68 to 26.[342]
  • December 11 - United States Deputy Secretary of Defense David Packard resigns.[343]
  • December 12 - Secretary of State Rogers said continued lack of action by the United Nations on the India-Pakistan War would portray the UN as ineffective while speaking to reporters.[344]

1972

  • January 2 - President Nixon explains his ordering of bombing within North Vietnam was due to a violation of a 1968 understanding that ceased bombing by the US during a nationally televised interview.[345]
  • January 3 - Jack Anderson claims that United States Secretary of State Henry Kissinger complained about President Nixon giving him "hell every half hour" in regards to the India-Pakistan conflict and that Kissinger said this during a December 3, 1971 strategy session.[346]
  • January 4 - President Nixon pledges the US will become the leading maritime country in the world while speaking at a shipbuilding yard in San Diego, California.[347]
  • January 11 - President Nixon signs an executive order alongside issuing a memoranda setting ordering pay increases to over 118,000 federal blue collar workers.[348]
  • January 13 - President Nixon announces the withdrawal of 70,000 American troops over the course of the next three months in a statement during the White House press briefing.[349]
  • January 28 - President Nixon announces the creation of an Office of Drug Law Enforcement within the Justice Department for the overseeing of jailing of illicit drug dealers.[350]
  • January 29 - A White House source discloses that President Nixon was known as "Quarterback" in messages sent to Secretary of State Kissinger during negotiations with North Vietnam.[351]
  • January 30 - United States Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird says a draft call will not take place until at least April during a televised interview.[352]
  • February 211972 Nixon visit to China
  • May 22 – Nixon visits the Soviet Union.[353]
  • October 18Clean Water Act
  • November 7 – Nixon beats Democratic Senator George McGovern in the United States presidential election of 1972.
  • December 1 - The White House discloses that Treasury Secretary Schultz will remain in his position during the second term of President Nixon with expanded responsibilities.[354]
  • December 2 - Interior Secretary Morton strips the supervision rights of the three men involved in Indian affairs alongside announcing his taking of personal command of the endeavor.[355]
  • December 4 - The government announces the withholding of 689 million in federal welfare payments as part of an effort to dislocate those not needing the program from those eligible.[356]
  • December 26 – Former President Harry S. Truman dies

1973

  • January 1 - The Labor Department states its choice to raise guidelines on income for the determining of who is eligible for federal programs and specifies the raise as $193 USD higher.[357]
  • January 2 - The Pentagon states American bombers possibly damaged a North Vietnam hospital and the a civilian airport in Hanoi following the Hanoi-Haiphong area bombing.[358]
  • January 3 - Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler states members of Congress should consider the possibility of convincing the North Vietnamese of their interest in acting against peace efforts.[359]
  • January 4 - President Nixon holds a meeting with military and diplomatic advisors in the Oval Office for discussions on Vietnam and the upcoming Paris peace talks.[360]
  • January 5 - President Nixon meets with Democratic and Republican congressional leaders for a breakfast to inform them the US should know whether a quick settlement in Vietnam is possible after the Paris peace talks.[361]
  • January 6 - The House and Senate jointly officiate the re-election of President Nixon and Vice President Spiro Agnew to a second term during a ceremony.[362]
  • January 8 - United States Secretary of Defense Melvin R. Laird says 5,000 men will be drafted between March 1 and July 1 during an appearance before Congress.[363]
  • January 9 - The Defense Department denies allegations made in a Saigon report that the US had resumed preemptive reaction air strikes over North Vietnam.[364] The White House announces President Nixon's acceptance of the resignation of Chairman of the Federal Trade Commission Miles Kirkpatrick.[365]
  • January 11 - President Nixon reveals Phase 3 in a message to Congress which eliminates a majority of wage and price controls.[366]
  • January 12 - The White House says Cabinet members will resume testifying before Congress and their upcoming appearances will be at convenience.[367]
  • January 14 - President Nixon sends United States Army General Alexander Haig to meet with President of South Vietnam Nguyễn Văn Thiệu.[368]
  • January 16 - White House Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler says United States Secretary of State Henry Kissinger will not return to the Paris peace talks ahead of the following week.[369] South Vietnamese sources state President Nixon intends to declare a unilateral Vietnam cease-fire to start on the eve of his second inauguration.[370]
  • January 17 - White House sources rebuke claims of an imminent cease-fire, citing earlier statements that President Nixon would not address peace negotiations during the week.[371]
  • January 18 - The Florida White House announces Secretary of State Kissinger will return to the Paris peace talks for a completion of "the text of an agreement".[372]
  • January 19 - Defense Secretary Laird says he cannot confirm the use of a cease-fire being effective in ending the Southeast Asia conflict during a Pentagon press conference.[373] Press Secretary Ziegler states President Nixon will have more press conference beginning with his second term.[374]
  • January 20Second inauguration of Richard Nixon
  • January 22 – Former President Lyndon B. Johnson dies
  • January 27Paris Peace Accords
  • June 22Agreement on the Prevention of Nuclear War
  • October 6 – The Yom Kippur War begins, which sparked the 1973 oil crisis, leading to the 1970s energy crisis.
  • October 10Spiro Agnew resigns as Vice President.
  • October 12 – Nixon nominates House minority leader Gerald Ford for Vice President.
  • November 5 – The term "Shuttle diplomacy" is first used to describe the efforts of Secretary of State Henry Kissinger to facilitate the cessation of hostilities following the Yom Kippur War.[375]
  • December 4-5 - President of Romania Nicolae Ceausescu meets with President Nixon for discussons on the development of economic relations between Romania and the United States.[376]
  • December 4 - President Nixon delivers an address in a formal welcome of President Ceausescu to the White House on the South Lawn during the morning.[377]
  • December 6 – Following Congressional approval, Gerald Ford is sworn in as the 40th Vice President of the United States. President Nixon signs H.R. 9474, a veterans disability and death pension bill, during an Oval Office ceremony.[378]

1974

January

  • January 2 - President Nixon sets a new national speed limit with his signing of the Emergency Highway Energy Conservation Act, also forbidding the Department of Transportation from assisting projects in states not compliant with the law.[379]
  • January 3 - United States Secretary of State Henry Kissinger says President Nixon will be personally involved in resolving the oil dispute during a press conference.[380]
  • January 4 - President Nixon announces he will not turn over hundreds of tapes and documents requested by the Senate Watergate committee.[381]
  • January 5 - Bernard Barker says he was told of the White House plumber unit having telephone and radio communication tapes that proved the Soviet embassy had access to the Pentagon Papers.[382]
  • January 6 - Vice President Gerald Ford says he agrees with President Nixon's choice to not surrender the tapes and that a compromise may be possibly attained during an appearance on Meet the Press.[383] Federal Energy Administrator William Simon says the Nixon administration thinks oil price reduction could occur during the spring.[384]
  • January 7 - White House sources reveal President Nixon has approved a budget with expenditures of 300 billion USD.[385]
  • January 9 - President Nixon sends messages to Allied nations for the purpose of scheduling a February 11 meeting in Washington to address energy conflicts of an international scale.[386] White House Chief of Staff Alexander Haig states President Nixon does not intend to devote any additional personal time to the Watergate scandal.[387]
  • January 11 - The Western White House confirms the intentional leak of information kept by the National Security Council.[388] Secretary of State Kissinger meets with President of Egypt Anwar Sadat in Aswan, Egypt during the evening.[389]
  • January 12 - Secretary of State Kissinger meets with Prime Minister of Israel Golda Meir in Jerusalem.[390]
  • January 14 - Justice Department attorneys offer a private look by a federal judge into the documents by Morton Halperin, a former aide to then-National Security Advisor Kissinger.[391] Assistant to the President Peter Flanigan says the US economy will continue growth within the year though possibly at a slowed pace while speaking at the American Farm Bureau Federation's 55th annual meeting.[392]
  • January 16 - The FBI is ordered by Special Watergate Prosecutor Leon Jaworski to investigate erasures on a Watergate tape recording.[393]
  • January 17 - The Federal District Court discloses Stephen Bull asked John Dean if he had knowledge of the Nixon recordings shortly after Dean's public announcement.[394]
  • January 18 - Federal Judge John Sirica urges a grand jury investigation of possible illegal tampering with tapped White House conversations on Watergate.[395] White House sources say President Nixon has decided to change the personnel of his administration, including replacing Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler.[396]
  • January 19 - President Nixon appears in a fifteen-minute broadcast to speak on energy and gasoline usage.[397]
  • January 20 - It is learned that President Nixon has postponed his State of the Union address to avoid conflicts with him attending a congressional dinner.[398]
  • January 22 - Secretary of State Kissinger reports his expectations that the ending of the Arab oil embargo will occur prior to Israel and Egypt ending their troop engagement in the Suez Canal.[399]
  • January 24 - President Nixon sends Congress a special message in which he says the new budget would require spending 7.6 billion USD on education.[400]
  • January 25 - It is reported Treasury Secretary Shultz has decided to resign and two friends mention he will be out of the administration by either March 15 or April 1.[401]
  • January 28 - First Lady Pat Nixon denies reports that President Nixon has been recently experiencing sleeping problems during an appearance in the state dining room of the White House.[402] President Nixon sends a special message to Congress in which he requests 13.6 billion USD for veteran benefits for the following fiscal year.[403]
  • January 29 - John Ehrlichman requests President Nixon be subpoenaed as a material witness for the former's trial for burglary and conspiracy in a motion made by Ehrlichman's attorney Douglas Dalton.[404] United States Secretary of Treasury George P. Shultz says President Nixon resigning or being impeached is unlikely during a press conference.[405]
  • January 30 - President Nixon delivers the 1974 State of the Union Address.[406]

February

  • February 1 - President Nixon proposes a flexible economic blueprint for the year to both stimulate the economy in a prevention of large unemployment and cause a lessening of inflationary pressures.[407]
  • February 2 - The Justice Department proposes legislation for the purpose of restricting arrest record dissemination as well as information also held in data banks.[408]
  • February 3 - Treasury Secretary Shultz says a fall from 9% to below 5% in the annual rate of inflation will occur in the latter part of the year during an interview.[409]
  • February 4 - President Nixon submits a 301.4 billion USD budget to Congress for the following fiscal year.[410]
  • February 5 - United States Secretary of Defense James R. Schlesinger indicates the US may enter another nuclear arms race with the Soviet Union during an address to the Senate Armed Services Committee.[411]
  • February 6 - President Nixon calls on quick decisiveness by Congress on the Comprehensive Health Insurance Plan.[412]
  • February 7 - President Nixon transmits the "third annual report of each Executive department and agency on their activities during fiscal year 1973 under the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970."[413]
  • February 8 - President Nixon issues a memorandum on the annual report on Federal Executive Boards.[414]
  • February 9 - President Nixon delivers an address on negotiations toward ending independent truck stoppages to reporters while in the Oval Office at the White House during the morning.[415] President Nixon delivers a radio address on transportation legislation in the Oval Office during the afternoon.[416]

March

  • March 1 - A grand jury indicts former Nixon advisors John Mitchell, H. R. Halderman, John Ehrlichman, and Charles Colson as well as three others on charges of conspiracy, obstruction of justice, and lying in the ongoing Watergate investigation.[417] The White House releases a statement saying President Nixon is hoping for a hasty conclusion in determining a resolution.[418]
  • March 4 - Treasury Secretary Schultz calls for Congress to not compare American trade with communist countries to the administration loosening prior policies on Soviet immigration while speaking to the Senate Finance Committee.[419] The White House releases 150 million in federal highway funds for the previous year.[420]
  • March 6 - President Nixon vetoes the Energy Emergency Act.[421] President Nixon holds a televised and radio broadcast news conference in the East Room at the White House during the evening.[422]
  • March 7 - President Nixon signs the Water Resources Development Act of 1974.[423]
  • March 8 - President Nixon delivers a radio address on the subject of campaign reform legislation proposals by Congress in the Oval Office during the afternoon.[424]
  • March 19 - President Nixon announces the Arab oil embargo lifting during a session to the National Association of Broadcasters.[425]
  • March 21 - Secretary of State Kissinger says the following week's Moscow trip is coming amidst a challenging time for American relations with the Soviets during a press conference.[426] President Nixon announces his selection of Robert Strausz-Hupé for United States Ambassador to Sweden.[427]
  • March 22 - The Nixon administration announces clean air legislation delaying certain deadlines and permits during a press conference.[428]
  • March 25 - The White House agrees to the requesting of two lawyers, who helped with President Nixon's taxes, for the waiving of the lawyer-client relationship so the duo can detail to Congress a dialogue they had with President Nixon about a tax deduction four years ago.[429]
  • March 27 - President Nixon delivers an address at a Washington fundraising dinner in which he predicts Republicans will perform well in the midterm elections.[430]
  • March 28 - The White House says President Nixon will only not veto the Consumer Protection Agency bill if the bill is rewritten to better align with business and industry.[431]
  • March 29 - The White House says President Nixon will surrender evidence subpoenaed by Watergate special prosecutor Jaworski.[432]

June

  • June 1 - President Nixon meets with Secretary General Kurt Waldhelm at the White House during the morning.[433]
  • June 3 - Informed sources state President Nixon's scheduled weeklong trip to the Middle East will include stops to Egypt, Israel, Syria, Saudi Arabia, and Jordan.[434]
  • June 4 - The White House and Justice Department announce the abolition of the Red Scare-era list containing subversive organizations kept by the Attorney General and meant to assist with government job applicants.[435]
  • June 16 – President Nixon makes the first ever US presidential trip to Israel.[436]

July

  • July 7 - President Nixon travels from Key Biscayne to Palm Beach, Florida during the morning to inspect the Mar-a-Lago estate.[437]
  • July 8 - The United States Customs Court rules President Nixon exceeded his authority in authorizing a surcharge of 10% on dutiable imports during 1971.[438]
  • July 10 - Judge Gerhard A. Gesell reads aloud President Nixon's testimony during the defense trial of Ehrlichman.[439]
  • July 11 - President Nixon announces his nomination of United States District Court Judge Murray I. Gurfein for judge of the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.[440] Assistant Special Watergate Prosecutor Richard Benveniste discloses the discovery of an additional gap in the recordings of White House presidential conversations.[441]
  • July 18 - President Nixon states his intent to finish his second term despite impeachment efforts in a telephone message to supporters.[442]
  • July 19 - President Nixon announces the nomination of associate F.A.A. administrator James E. Dow today to be deputy administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration.[443]
  • July 26 - President Nixon signs he Emergency Livestock Credit Act of 1974 into law.[444]
  • July 27 - President Nixon presents the Medal of Freedom of Charles LeRoy Lowman at the Western White House during the morning.[445]
  • July 29 - A second recommendation of President Nixon's impeachment is approved by the House Judiciary Committee in a vote of 28 to 10.[446] Former United States Secretary of Treasury John Connally is indicted on charges of pocketing $10,000 from Jake Jacobsen in exchange for changing pricing on milk.[447]
  • July 30 - President Nixon issues Executive Order 11796, furthering regulations on exports.[448] The White House issues a statement favorable of the signing of a Cyprus international agreement.[449]
  • July 31 - The White House admits the House of Representatives will impeach President Nixon barring a large shift in voting.[450] President Nixon issues Proclamation 4305, designating the week beginning on the upcoming October 20 as "National Forest Products Week".[451]

August

  • August 2 - Nixon tells his family of his intention to resign from the presidency.[452] President Nixon's lawyers surrender an additional 13 tapes of Watergate conversations to District Judge John Sirica.[453]
  • August 4 - President Nixon meets with aides and speechwriters at Camp David.[454]
  • August 6 - Governor of California Ronald Reagan urges President Nixon to speak truthfully before Congress during a news conference.[455]
  • August 7 - Secretary of State Henry Kissinger informs President Nixon of the administration's belief that he should resign "in the national interest."[456]
  • August 8 – President Nixon announces his intention to resign the presidency.
  • August 9 – Nixon resigns the presidency.[457]

References

  1. ^ "Richard Nixon: Inaugural Address". presidency.ucsb.edu. Retrieved 2017-02-04. 
  2. ^ Young, Robert (January 21, 1969). "Nixon Beats Aids to Work on First Day". Chicago Tribune. 
  3. ^ Harrison, Jon (January 22, 1969). "January 22, 1969 : Governor George Romney Resigns to Join Richard Nixon's Cabinet". Michigan State University. 
  4. ^ Warden, Philip (January 29, 1969). "Nixon Breaks Precedent In Visit To House". Chicago Tribune. 
  5. ^ Yuenger, James (January 31, 1969). "Nixon Visits Negro Area of Washington". Chicago Tribune. 
  6. ^ "Need 'Cold Cash' to Solve Urban Woes, Moynihan Says". Chicago Tribune. February 2, 1969. 
  7. ^ Young, Robert (February 3, 1969). "Nixon Plans Western Europe Trip Within Next Two Months". Chicago Tribune. 
  8. ^ "Nixon OK's Greater Project Grants". Chicago Tribune. February 5, 1969. 
  9. ^ Yuenger, James (February 6, 1969). "Nixon Stand; No Gi Pullout From Viet Now". Chicago Tribune. 
  10. ^ Young, Robert (February 8, 1969). "Nixon Asks Study of US Space Costs". Chicago Tribune. 
  11. ^ Young, Robert (February 10, 1969). "Nixon Sticks to Berlin Visit Plans". Chicago Tribune. 
  12. ^ "Nixon Blames Johnson For Oil Spillage". Chicago Tribune. February 12, 1969. 
  13. ^ "Nixon Urges Strong Local Government". Chicago Tribune. February 13, 1969. 
  14. ^ Yuenger, James (February 15, 1969). "Resigns Job as Consumer Aid to Nixon". Chicago Tribune. 
  15. ^ Young, Robert (February 19, 1969). "Nixon Plans Long de Gaulle Talk". Chicago Tribune. 
  16. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_H-DCi_42JQ
  17. ^ "Didn't Cause Market Fall: David Kennedy". Chicago Tribune. February 22, 1969. 
  18. ^ Young, Robert (February 24, 1969). "Nixon Plans Russ Talks". Chicago Tribune. 
  19. ^ Young, Robert (February 28, 1969). "Nixon Cheered By Thousands In W. Berlin". Chicago Tribune. 
  20. ^ Young, Robert (March 1, 1969). "French Chief Hails Nixon; Talks Begin". Chicago Tribune. 
  21. ^ Young, Robert (March 2, 1969). "De Gaulle Aid Hails Talks". Chicago Tribune. 
  22. ^ "Nixon Backs In U.S. After Europe Tour". Chicago Tribune. March 3, 1969. 
  23. ^ "Nixon, Staff Discuss ABM". Chicago Tribune. March 10, 1969. 
  24. ^ "350 Persons Attend White House Service". Chicago Tribune. 
  25. ^ Elsasser, Glen (March 17, 1969). "Stans Hints At Curbs On Price Hikes". Chicago Tribune. 
  26. ^ Farrar, Fred. "No Cutback in Vietnam, Laird Says". Chicago Tribune. 
  27. ^ Farrar, Fred (March 21, 1969). "Step Toward Peace, Laird Says Of ABM". 
  28. ^ "Nixon Says Key to Settlement Is In Secret Talks; Refuses to Say if Negotiations Have Begun". Chicago Tribune. March 25, 1969. 
  29. ^ Dombrowski, Louis (March 26, 1969). "Nixon Vows Budget Cut In Tax Plea". Chicago Tribune. 
  30. ^ Freeburg, Russell (April 2, 1969). "B-52 Raids to Be Cut, Laird Says". 
  31. ^ Gill, Donna (April 3, 1969). "Ike Buried in Abilene; Nixon, Johnson at Rites". Chicago Tribune. 
  32. ^ "Laird Tells Private Viet Talk Progress". Chicago Tribune. April 4, 1969. 
  33. ^ Young, Robert (April 5, 1969). "Nixon Sends Aid to Visit King's Widow". Chicago Tribune. 
  34. ^ Freeburg, Russell (April 8, 1969). "Nixon Troop Withdrawal Goals Told". Chicago Tribune. 
  35. ^ Freeburg, Russell (April 9, 1969). "U.S. Offers Riot Cleanup Funds". Chicago Tribune. 
  36. ^ "D.C. Home Rule Is Requested By President". Chicago Tribune. April 29, 1969. 
  37. ^ "Nixon Rules ABM No Factor in Science Job". Chicago Tribune. April 29, 1969. 
  38. ^ "Nixon Calls, Helps Start A New Paper". Chicago Tribune. April 29, 1969. 
  39. ^ Young, Robert (April 29, 1969). "Nixon Regrets to de Gaulle". Chicago Tribune. 
  40. ^ Dombrowski, Louis (April 30, 1969). "Nixon Urges Tough Stand On Campuses". Chicago Tribune. 
  41. ^ "Two Accolades: One Earned and One Purchased". Chicago Tribune. April 30, 1969. 
  42. ^ "Nixon ASKS COURT ON SMUT". Chicago Tribune. May 2, 1969. 
  43. ^ 181 - Special Message to the Congress on Obscene and Pornographic Materials. (May 2, 1969)
  44. ^ 182 - Remarks in Columbia, S.C., During a Visit With Former Governor and Mrs. James Byrnes. (May 3, 1969)
  45. ^ Young, Robert (May 4, 1969). "Bare Viet Pullout Terms". Chicago Tribune. 
  46. ^ Elmer, John. "Polish Americans Hear Volpe Assails Militants". Chicago Tribune. 
  47. ^ "Bane Picked by Nixon TO Be U.S. Judge". Chicago Tribune. May 27, 1969. 
  48. ^ Young, Robert (May 28, 1969). "Nixon Requests On Foreign Aid A Record Low". Chicago Tribune. 
  49. ^ Warden, Philip (May 31, 1969). "Nixon, Rogers Discuss Viet; Head for the Grand Bahamas". 
  50. ^ "Nixon Returns to Washington After Holiday". Chicago Tribune. June 1, 1969. 
  51. ^ "Hubert Backs Nixon Efforts on Viet Peace". Chicago Tribune. June 2, 1969. 
  52. ^ "Nixon Confers With Aichi on Okinawa Issue". Chicago Tribune. June 2, 1969. 
  53. ^ Freeburg, Russell (June 4, 1969). "Campus Radicals Assailed by Nixon". Chicago Tribune. 
  54. ^ Pach, Chester (May 5, 2010). ""Our Worst Enemy Seems to Be the Press": TV News, the Nixon Administration, and U.S. Troop Withdrawal from Vietnam, 1969–1973". Oxford Academic. 
  55. ^ Freeburg, Russell (June 5, 1969). "Nixon Names Iowan VA". Chicago Tribune. 
  56. ^ a b Young, Robert (August 30, 1969). "Nixon Orders $500,000 in Aid for Flood Damage in S. Illinois". Chicago Tribune. 
  57. ^ "Nixon and Thieu meet at Midway". June 8, 1969. 
  58. ^ "Nixon-Peace Door Open". Chicago Tribune. June 11, 1969. 
  59. ^ "Runaway Inflation Feared". Chicago Tribune. June 11, 1969. 
  60. ^ "U.S. Cancels Space Laboratory Program". Chicago Tribune. 
  61. ^ Farrar, Fred. "900 in 9th Infantry Picked to Quit Viet; Others Will Follow". Chicago Tribune. 
  62. ^ Yuenger, James (June 29, 1969). "Nixon Will Go To Romania". Chicago Tribune. 
  63. ^ "Report Finch Will Cut Fees For Medicaid". Chicago Tribune. June 30, 1969. 
  64. ^ "Viet Criticism Gets Reply From Agnew". Chicago Tribune. July 2, 1969. 
  65. ^ "Rogers Tells Drops in Fighting; Hanoi to Free Three Pows". Chicago Tribune. July 3, 1969. 
  66. ^ "Nixons Arrive In Florida For Short Holiday". Chicago Tribune. July 3, 1969. 
  67. ^ Elsasser, Glen (July 4, 1969). "Ease School Bias Rules". Chicago Tribune. 
  68. ^ "Nixon Urges Arms Talks". Chicago Tribune. August 4, 1969. 
  69. ^ "Nixon Radios Reply to Reed Boat Crew". Chicago Tribune. July 5, 1969. 
  70. ^ "Delegation to Nuclear Arms Talks Is Selected by Nixon". Chicago Tribune. July 6, 1969. 
  71. ^ Young, Robert. "Nixon Plays Golf as Holiday Finale". Chicago Tribune. 
  72. ^ "Nixon to Air Position on Medical Costs". Chicago Tribune. 
  73. ^ Hutchinson, Louise (July 9, 1969). "Nixon Pledges To Seek Jobs For Women". Chicago Tribune. 
  74. ^ "White House Welcome". Chicago Tribune. July 9, 1969. 
  75. ^ "Nixon Urges Extension of Jobless Pay". Chicago Tribune. 
  76. ^ "A Medical Crisis: Nixon". Chicago Tribune. July 11, 1969. 
  77. ^ "Ambassadors Named to Australia, Peru". Chicago Tribune. July 11, 1969. 
  78. ^ "Change Bail Regulations, Mitchell Asks". Chicago Tribune. 
  79. ^ "The Change in 10 Years". Chicago Tribune. July 12, 1969. 
  80. ^ "Gases Tested In Open Air, Army Admits". Chicago Tribune. 
  81. ^ "Link Viet War Lull To Nixon". Chicago Tribune. July 13, 1969. 
  82. ^ Elsasser, Glen (July 15, 1969). "U.S. Doing Less Wiretapping Under Nixon, Mitchell Says". Chicago Tribune. 
  83. ^ Hernandez, Daniela. "Tech Time Warp of the Week: Watch President Nixon Dial the Moon in 1969". Wired. Retrieved 2017-02-04. 
  84. ^ "Richard Nixon: Informal Remarks in Guam With Newsmen". presidency.ucsb.edu. Retrieved 2017-02-04. 
  85. ^ "Try to Solve Our Problems, Romney Urges City Officials". Chicago Tribune. July 26, 1969. 
  86. ^ "Nixon Vows Peace Drive as He Opens Seven-Nation Tour". Chicago Tribune. July 26, 1969. 
  87. ^ "Nixon Vows U.S. Aid To Asian Allies". Chicago Tribune. July 27, 1969. 
  88. ^ "Sihanouk Invites Nixon to Cambodia". Chicago Tribune. August 2, 1969. 
  89. ^ "Nixon Flies to Red Romania; Feels Asian Goals Achieved". Chicago Tribune. August 2, 1969. 
  90. ^ "U.S. Desires Dialog With China: Rogers". Chicago Tribune. August 4, 1969. 
  91. ^ "Nixon In Washington After Circling Globe". Chicago Tribune. August 4, 1969. 
  92. ^ Rohrbach, Edward (August 5, 1969). "Briefs French Leaders On Nixon's Trip". Chicago Tribune. 
  93. ^ Warden, Philip (August 5, 1969). "Vote To Keep 10% Surtax". Chicago Tribune. 
  94. ^ "Richard Nixon: Address to the Nation on Domestic Programs". presidency.ucsb.edu. Retrieved 2017-02-04. 
  95. ^ "U.S. To Ask Red China To Start Talks: Rogers". Chicago Tribune. August 8, 1969. 
  96. ^ Elsasser, Glen (August 10, 1969). "President Supports Strong Bill on Equal Employment". Chicago Tribune. 
  97. ^ Elsasser, Glen. "Tells of Cabinet Split Over Welfare Reform". Chicago Tribune. 
  98. ^ "Nixon Seeks Quick Reform on Welfare". Chicago Tribune. August 12, 1969. 
  99. ^ "President Sends Congress Manpower Training Program". Chicago Tribune. August 13, 1969. 
  100. ^ Young, Robert (August 14, 1969). "Raised Sights of Mankind: Nixon". 
  101. ^ Young, Robert (August 15, 1969). "Nixon Considering 2d Troop Withdrawal from Viet Nam". Chicago Tribune. 
  102. ^ "Warns Inflation Will Cut Dollar in Half by '80". Chicago Tribune. 
  103. ^ Young, Robert (August 18, 1969). "3,000 Protest Viet War Near Nixon's Home". Chicago Tribune. 
  104. ^ Young, Robert (August 19, 1969). "Nixon Names Haynsworth to Supreme Court vacancy". Chicago Tribune. 
  105. ^ "Nixon Orders Disaster Aid To Louisiana". Chicago Tribune. August 20, 1969. 
  106. ^ "Urge End to U.S. Taboo on Cuba: Church Council". Chicago Tribune. August 21, 1969. 
  107. ^ Kling, WIlliam. "Slash In Defense Ordered". Chicago Tribune. 
  108. ^ Kling, William. "Navy Fleet Will Be Cut by 76 Ships". Chicago Tribune. 
  109. ^ Young, Robert (September 2, 1969). "Nixon Asks New Strategy". Chicago Tribune. 
  110. ^ Tagge, George (September 3, 1969). "Governors Support Health Plan". Chicago Tribune. 
  111. ^ "U.S. Plans 75% Cut in Federal Spending". Chicago Tribune. September 3, 1969. 
  112. ^ "Nixon Backs Bill To Allow Bigger Trucks". Chicago Tribune. September 4, 1969. 
  113. ^ Young, Robert. "Nixon Orders U.S. Building Cut Back 75%". Chicago Tribune. 
  114. ^ "Nixon Accused of Wanting Tax Reform to Help Rich". Chicago Tribune. September 6, 1969. 
  115. ^ Yuenger, James (September 7, 1969). "Laird Cuts Off Army Building". Chicago Tribune. 
  116. ^ "EV Dirksen Is Dead At 73". Chicago Tribune. September 8, 1969. 
  117. ^ "Astronaut Plans Told". Chicago Tribune. September 9, 1969. 
  118. ^ Freeburg, Russell (September 10, 1969). "Dirksen One of Great Men in Nation: Nixon". Chicago Tribune. 
  119. ^ Beckman, Aldo (September 11, 1969). "Urged U.S. To Send Representative to Ho Funeral: Fulbright". Chicago Tribune. 
  120. ^ Young, Robert. "President to Address 24th Session of U.N". Chicago Tribune. 
  121. ^ Young, Robert (September 13, 1969). "Nixon: Resume B-52 Raids". Chicago Tribune. 
  122. ^ "Nixon School Stand Hit by Rights Board". Chicago Tribune. September 13, 1969. 
  123. ^ 365 - Address Before the 24th Session of the General Assembly of the United Nations. (September 18, 1969)
  124. ^ 366 - Remarks Concerning Changes in Draft Calls and Pending Draft Legislation. (September 19, 1969)
  125. ^ 367 - Remarks to Members of the Association of Student Governments. (September 20, 1969)
  126. ^ 368 - Statement on the Construction Industry Collective Bargaining Commission. (September 22, 1969)
  127. ^ 369 - Remarks Announcing Decision To Continue Development of the Supersonic Transport. (September 23, 1969)
  128. ^ 370 - Statement on the Subway System for the District of Columbia. (September 24, 1969)
  129. ^ "Nixon Predicts Haynsworth's Confirmation". Chicago Tribune. September 27, 1969. 
  130. ^ Dumbrowski, Louis (September 27, 1969). "Nixon Warns Against Wage, Price Hikes". Chicago Tribune. 
  131. ^ Freeburg, Russell (September 26, 1969). "'Critics Delay Peace'". Chicago Tribune. 
  132. ^ 376 - Remarks on the Departure of Prime Minister Golda Meir of Israel. (September 26, 1969)
  133. ^ "No Timetable For GI Pullout - White House". Chicago Tribune. September 30, 1969. 
  134. ^ "Drops Army Beret Case". Chicago Tribune. September 30, 1969. 
  135. ^ Elsasser, Glen (October 2, 1969). "U.S. Seeks End To Suit By 3 From Chicago". Chicago Tribune. 
  136. ^ "Nixon Pushes Efforts to Build Haynsworth Senate Support". Chicago Tribune. October 3, 1969. 
  137. ^ Beckman, Aldo (October 4, 1969). "Nixon Creates Inquiry Board". Chicago Tribune. 
  138. ^ "Career Work For All Now Finch's Goal". Chicago Tribune. October 4, 1969. 
  139. ^ "Nixon Names Study Group". Chicago Tribune. October 7, 1969. 
  140. ^ "Laird Tells Dual Course To End War". Chicago Tribune. October 8, 1969. 
  141. ^ "Nixon Advisor Says Price of Meat is Down". Chicago Tribune. October 9, 1969. 
  142. ^ "President Will Replace Hershey as Draft Boss". Chicago Tribune. October 11, 1969. 
  143. ^ Young, Robert (October 12, 1969). "Nixon Urges Congress To Get Moving". Chicago Tribune. 
  144. ^ "Bison Emblem Readopted By Interior Unit". Chicago Tribune. October 12, 1969. 
  145. ^ Elsasser, Glen (October 13, 1969). "Nixon's Peace Progress Told; Draws Criticism of 2 Senators". Chicago Tribune. 
  146. ^ Young, Robert (October 14, 1969). "Nixon Sets Viet Talk". Chicago Tribune. 
  147. ^ "Army Race Situation Is Concern to Resor". Chicago Tribune. October 14, 1969. 
  148. ^ "Hanoi Hails Protest Day". Chicago Tribune. October 15, 1969. 
  149. ^ "Nixon Hears Reagan Hit Viet Protest at Ike Birthday Fete". Chicago Tribune. October 15, 1969. 
  150. ^ "Three Middle West GIs Killed in Viet Fighting". Chicago Tribune. October 16, 1969. 
  151. ^ Young, Robert (October 17, 1969). "Nixon To Speak On Prices". Chicago Tribune. 
  152. ^ Farrar, Fred (October 17, 1969). "U.S. Budgets Post-War GI Force in Viet". Chicago Tribune. 
  153. ^ Young, Robert (October 18, 1969). "Nixon: Inflation Slowing". Chicago Tribune. 
  154. ^ Freeburg, Russell (October 18, 1969). "Name Burns To Be Money Policy Chief". Chicago Tribune. 
  155. ^ Young, Robert (October 21, 1969). "Nixon Assails Haynsworth Foes as Character Assassins". Chicago Tribune. 
  156. ^ "Easier Laws On Drugs Use Asked By U.S". Chicago Tribune. October 21, 1969. 
  157. ^ Young, Robert. "Nixon Greets Two Russian Cosmonauts". Chicago Tribune. 
  158. ^ "Opposes Cease-Fire Plan". Chicago Tribune. October 23, 1969. 
  159. ^ "Senate Acts Over Nixon Objections". Chicago Tribune. October 23, 1969. 
  160. ^ "Calls For Cut in Tax Break on Mortgage". Chicago Tribune. October 24, 1969. 
  161. ^ "Cong Plan to Take Advantage of U.S. Pullout". Chicago Tribune. November 2, 1969. 
  162. ^ Elsasser, Glen (November 3, 1969). "Vows To Carry Out Supreme Court Order". Chicago Tribune. 
  163. ^ 425 - Address to the Nation on the War in Vietnam (November 3, 1969)
  164. ^ 427 - Statement About the National Program for Voluntary Action (November 4, 1969)
  165. ^ 429 - Remarks With the Governors-Elect of New Jersey and Virginia. (November 5, 1969)
  166. ^ Dombrowski, Louis (November 13, 1969). "Finch Urges Gradual Cutback in DDT Use Over Next 2 Years". Chicago Tribune. 
  167. ^ Yuenger, James (November 20, 1969). "Nixon, Sato Hint Progress in Talks on Okinawa Return". Chicago Tribune. 
  168. ^ "Lodge Quits Paris Post". Chicago Tribune. November 21, 1969. 
  169. ^ "U.S. to Give Back Okinawa to Japan". Chicago Tribune. November 22, 1969. 
  170. ^ Warden, Philip (November 22, 1969). "Senate Bars Nixon Court Choice, 55-45". Chicago Tribune. 
  171. ^ Elmer, John (November 23, 1969). "Nixon Pledges Help to G.O.P. Illinois Races". Chicago Tribune. 
  172. ^ "Russia, U.S. Ratify World Arms Treaty". Chicago Tribune. November 25, 1969. 
  173. ^ "Reports Nixon to Ban Chemical Arms USe". Chicago Tribune. November 25, 1969. 
  174. ^ Warden, Philip (December 2, 1969). "Senate Votes To Trim Oil's Tax Benefits". Chicago Tribune. 
  175. ^ Kling, William (December 3, 1969). "House Backs Nixon on Viet". Chicago Tribune. 
  176. ^ "Statement by Secretary of State Rogers- 9 December 1969". Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs. 
  177. ^ Itamar Rabinovich; Haim Shaked (1978). From June to October: The Middle East Between 1967 And 1973. Transaction Publishers. p. 10. ISBN 978-1-4128-2418-7. 
  178. ^ Beckman, Aldo (December 12, 1969). "House OK's Nixon Voter Rights Bill". Chicago Tribune. 
  179. ^ "Agnew Raps Senate's Tax Bill Action". Chicago Tribune. December 13, 1969. 
  180. ^ Bishop, Barry (December 14, 1969). "U.S. Assures Latin of 1.2 Million in Aid". Chicago Tribune. 
  181. ^ Elsasser, Glen (December 15, 1969). "Nixon Talk on Viet Today". Chicago Tribune. 
  182. ^ Young, Robert (December 16, 1969). "Nixon Calls Viet Cuts Necessary 'Risks For Peace'". Chicago Tribune. 
  183. ^ "U.S., Russ Hold Ninth Session of Arms Talk". Chicago Tribune. December 16, 1969. 
  184. ^ Kling, William (December 16, 1969). "Senate OK's Defense Money Bill, Rejects Anti-ABM Effort". Chicago Tribune. 
  185. ^ Young, Robert. "Nixon Lights Tree; Peace Is His Theme". Chicago Tribune. 
  186. ^ "Laird Cites 3d Troop Removal from Viet Nam". Chicago Tribune. December 17, 1969. 
  187. ^ "U.S. Official Raps Hanoi's Paris Stance". Chicago Tribune. December 19, 1969. 
  188. ^ "Nixon Jolts Congress In Veto Threat". Chicago Tribune. December 19, 1969. 
  189. ^ "Nixon Hints Tax Measure O.K". Chicago Tribune. December 21, 1969. 
  190. ^ Yuenger, James (December 21, 1969). "Shultz Makes Last Ditch Try to Save Plan Ending Job Bias". Chicago Tribune. 
  191. ^ "Blacks Have Little Confidence in White House, Says Bunche". Chicago Tribune. December 29, 1969. 
  192. ^ "Nixon to Act on Tax Bill Before Vacation". Chicago Tribune. December 30, 1969. 
  193. ^ "Measure Hikes Age Pay; Nixon Tells of Qualms". Chicago Tribune. December 31, 1969. 
  194. ^ "Nixon Moves Vote Registry". Chicago Tribune. December 31, 1969. 
  195. ^ "Agnew Lands In Thailand On Asia Tour". Chicago Tribune. January 3, 1970. 
  196. ^ "Nixon Drafts Budget; Hints At Tax Hike". Chicago Tribune. January 4, 1970. 
  197. ^ Simms, Kenneth (January 4, 1970). "Agnew, Thais Discuss Red Troop Threat". Chicago Tribune. 
  198. ^ Freeburg, Russell. "U.S., China Agree To Resume Meeting". Chicago Tribune. 
  199. ^ "Nixon Dinner Cut Short By War Protest". Chicago Tribune. January 10, 1970. 
  200. ^ "Strike Impact Rated Too Highly: Shultz". Chicago Tribune. January 11, 1970. 
  201. ^ "Nixon To Give Aid To Biafra". Chicago Tribune. January 12, 1970. 
  202. ^ "Negro Named Ambassador To Sweden". Chicago Tribune. 
  203. ^ Yuenger, James. "U.S. Optimism On Nigerian Situation Told". Chicago Tribune. 
  204. ^ Young, Robert. "Cut Budget Again: Nixon". Chicago Tribune. 
  205. ^ Young, Robert (January 16, 1970). "Everglades Jetport Ban Negotiated". 
  206. ^ "Laird Predicts Armed Forces Slash of 300,000 Men By June". Chicago Tribune. January 16, 1970. 
  207. ^ Dombrowski, Louis. "Nixon's Tight Fiscal Policy To Continue". Chicago Tribune. 
  208. ^ Simms, Kenneth (January 18, 1970). "War Zone Visit Was Trip's Highlight: Agnew". Chicago Tribune. 
  209. ^ "Rogers Finds Hope in Red China Talks". Chicago Tribune. January 18, 1970. 
  210. ^ "Grant 236 Million for Crime". Chicago Tribune. January 19, 1970. 
  211. ^ Simms, Kenneth. "Agnew Meets Chief of U.S. Pacific Unit". 
  212. ^ "Nixon Picks Floridian For Justice Seat". Chicago Tribune. January 20, 1970. 
  213. ^ "HEW Bill OK'd in Face of Veto". Chicago Tribune. January 21, 1970. 
  214. ^ Freeburg, Russell (January 21, 1970). "Shultz Hails Chicago Plan To Hire Blacks". Chicago Tribune. 
  215. ^ "Nixon Sets Path For 70's". Chicago Tribune. January 23, 1970. 
  216. ^ Warden, Philip. "Senate OK's Crime Bill". Chicago Tribune. 
  217. ^ "Nixon Hints Arms Aid Boost to Israel". Chicago Tribune. January 26, 1970. 
  218. ^ Warden, Philip (January 27, 1970). "HEW MONEY BILL VETOED". Chicago Tribune. 
  219. ^ "Wilson, Nixon Swap Views On Top Issues". Chicago Tribune. January 27, 1970. 
  220. ^ Warden, Philip (January 29, 1970). "A Veto Victory For Nixon". Chicago Tribune. 
  221. ^ Freeburg, Russell (January 30, 1970). "No Resumption Of North Viet Bombing; US". Chicago Tribune. 
  222. ^ "Agnew Calls Off TV Feud; Assails Paper". Chicago Tribune. January 31, 1970. 
  223. ^ "Nixon Copter Pad Defended By Press Aid". Chicago Tribune. February 1, 1970. 
  224. ^ Elsasser, Glen (February 2, 1970). "U.S. Planning Unit On South School Woes". Chicago Tribune. 
  225. ^ Dombrowski, Louis (February 3, 1970). "A 'Human' U.S. Budget". Chicago Tribune. 
  226. ^ "No Euphoria Created on Viet: Agnew". Chicago Tribune. February 4, 1970. 
  227. ^ Warden, Philip. "Nixon Offers to Compromise with Congress on HEW Funds". Chicago Tribune. 
  228. ^ Young, Robert (February 5, 1970). "Nixon Orders U.S. Facilities to Stop Polluting Water, Air". Chicago Tribune. 
  229. ^ Young, Robert. "Nixon, Mayor Discuss Crime". Chicago Tribune. 
  230. ^ Young, Robert (February 6, 1970). "Nixon, Mayors Discuss Crime". Chicago Tribune. 
  231. ^ Elsasser, Glen (February 9, 1970). "Kennedy Sees Slowdown In Price Spiral". Chicago Tribune. 
  232. ^ "Agnew Calls Dems' Views Pure Fable". Chicago Tribune. February 10, 1970. 
  233. ^ "Bares Racket At Airport". Chicago Tribune. February 11, 1970. 
  234. ^ "Nixon Pledges Jobless Rise Curb". Chicago Tribune. February 24, 1970. 
  235. ^ "Votes Full Cost of School Meals". Chicago Tribune. 
  236. ^ "French Chief and Nixon Meet Today". Chicago Tribune. February 24, 1970. 
  237. ^ Toast of the President at a Dinner Honoring President Pompidou of France in New York City. (March 2, 1970)
  238. ^ Special Message to the Congress on Education Reform. (March 3, 1970)
  239. ^ Executive Order 11513—Establishing the President's Commission on School Finance (March 3, 1970)
  240. ^ 68 - Message to the Congress Transmitting the Annual Report on the Foreign Assistance Program. (March 4, 1970)
  241. ^ Executive Order 11514—Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality (March 5, 1970)
  242. ^ Remarks at a Ceremony Marking the Ratification and Entry Into Force of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. (March 5, 1970)
  243. ^ Warden, Philip (April 2, 1970). "Nixon Firm On Carswell Nomination". Chicago Tribune. 
  244. ^ "O.K. Nixon Rail Bill: Shultz". Chicago Tribune. April 3, 1970. 
  245. ^ "Nixon Urges Dime Mail". Chicago Tribune. April 4, 1970. 
  246. ^ "Nixon Toss 'Rock' Party for Windsors". Chicago Tribune. April 5, 1970. 
  247. ^ Elsasser, Glen (April 6, 1970). "President, LBJ Meet in Prayer". Chicago Tribune. 
  248. ^ "Faculty Integration Urgent, Says Finch". Chicago Tribune. April 8, 1970. 
  249. ^ "Nixon Honors 21 Service Men Killed in Viet Nam". Chicago Tribune. April 8, 1970. 
  250. ^ "Carsen Bid Turned Down". Chicago Tribune. April 9, 1970. 
  251. ^ "No Southern Judge: Nixon". Chicago Tribune. April 10, 1970. 
  252. ^ "Nixon, Brandt Finish Two Days of Talks". Chicago Tribune. April 12, 1970. 
  253. ^ "A Reluctant Nixon Signs Schools Bill". Chicago Tribune. April 14, 1970. 
  254. ^ "Nixon Names Blackmun, 61, To Top Court". Chicago Tribune. April 15, 1970. 
  255. ^ "Nixon Asks Dumping Ban In the Lake". Chicago Tribune. April 16, 1970. 
  256. ^ "Nixon Calls on TV Talk on Viet Nam". Chicago Tribune. April 16, 1970. 
  257. ^ "House Votes Reform Bill on Welfare". Chicago Tribune. April 17, 1970. 
  258. ^ "A Happy Ending!". Chicago Tribune. April 18, 1970. 
  259. ^ "Nixon Hails Space Heroes". Chicago Tribune. April 19, 1970. 
  260. ^ "Nixon Maps New Viet Cuts". Chicago Tribune. April 21, 1970. 
  261. ^ "Find China Fired Orbiter At New Base". Chicago Tribune. April 29, 1970. 
  262. ^ "President Briefs New Negotiator On Peace Talks". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. July 5, 1974. 
  263. ^ "No Decision Made By Rogers, Thieu On Peace Proposals". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. July 5, 1974. 
  264. ^ "Nixon Finishes Tito Talks After Warmest Welcome". Chicago Tribune. October 2, 1970. 
  265. ^ Remarks at the Serbian Council Building in Belgrade. (October 1, 1970)
  266. ^ Remarks on Arrival at Madrid, Spain (October 2, 1970)
  267. ^ Remarks on Accepting the Key to the City of Madrid (October 2, 1970)
  268. ^ Remarks on Departure From Spain (October 3, 1970)
  269. ^ "Nixon Sees Envoy, Pat Her Kin". Chicago Tribune. October 5, 1970. 
  270. ^ "Trip Aided Peace - Nixon". Chicago Tribune. October 6, 1970. 
  271. ^ Beckman, Aldo (October 6, 1970). "Nixon Promises the Irish He Will Strive for Peace". Chicago Tribune. 
  272. ^ "Nixon Airs Viet Plan Policy". Chicago Tribune. October 6, 1970. 
  273. ^ "Nixon to Address U.N. at 25th Yr. Rites". Chicago Tribune. October 7, 1970. 
  274. ^ "Nixon Sees Congress Backing of Peace Plan as a Lesson to Hanoi". Chicago Tribune. October 9, 1970. 
  275. ^ "President Will Speak in 5 States". Chicago Tribune. October 15, 1970. 
  276. ^ "President Pledges Crime War". Chicago Tribune. October 16, 1970. 
  277. ^ "Rogers, Gromyko Meet on Crisis in Middle East". Chicago Tribune. October 17, 1970. 
  278. ^ "Agnew, Adlai Lash Out at Rallies Here". Chicago Tribune. October 20, 1970. 
  279. ^ "Roudebush and I Think Alike, Asserts Nixon". Chicago Tribune. October 21, 1970. 
  280. ^ Yuenger, James. "Nixon, Gromyko Hold Long Talk on Improving Relations". Chicago Tribune. 
  281. ^ Fulton, William (October 24, 1970). "Nixon to Russ: Aid Peace". Chicago Tribune. 
  282. ^ "Southerner on Court Is Agnew Vow". Chicago Tribune. 
  283. ^ Remarks in Dallas, Texas. (October 28, 1970)
  284. ^ Remarks to Overflow Crowd in Mayo Civic Auditorium, Rochester, Minnesota. (October 29, 1970)
  285. ^ Proclamation 4020—World Law Day, 1970 (October 30, 1970)
  286. ^ Remarks at Phoenix, Arizona. (October 31, 1970)
  287. ^ "Agnew Charges Tunney with Campaign Lying". Chicago Tribune. November 2, 1970. 
  288. ^ Beckman, Aldo (November 5, 1970). "'New' Senate Is Acclaimed by President". Chicago Tribune. 
  289. ^ Elsasser, Glen (November 7, 1970). "Nixon Appoints Ruckelshaus as Ecology Chief". Chicago Tribune. 
  290. ^ "Nixon Meets with New York Conservatives". November 9, 1970. 
  291. ^ "De Gaulle Rite Tomorrow". Chicago Tribune. November 11, 1970. 
  292. ^ "Nixon Talks With Soviet President". Chicago Tribune. November 13, 1970. 
  293. ^ "Nixon Confers with Mexico's New President at White House". Chicago Tribune. November 14, 1970. 
  294. ^ 437 - Remarks at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia. (November 17, 1970)
  295. ^ Beckman, Aldo. "Nixon Continues Conferences on Money Policy". Chicago Tribune. 
  296. ^ "Laird Denies POW Camp Was Bombed". Chicago Tribune. November 22, 1970. 
  297. ^ "POW Rescue By U.S. Fails". Chicago Tribune. November 24, 1970. 
  298. ^ "Senate Upholds Veto of Campaign Spending Limit". Chicago Tribune. November 24, 1970. 
  299. ^ "U.S Warns Hanoi On POWS". Chicago Tribune. November 24, 1970. 
  300. ^ Executive Order 11569—Amending the Selective Service Regulations (November 24, 1970)
  301. ^ 439 - Remarks Introducing James F. Oates, Jr., Chairman, Jobs for Veterans Program. (November 24, 1970)
  302. ^ "Nixon Orders Investigation of Asylum Denial". Chicago Tribune. December 1, 1970. 
  303. ^ "Kissinger Given FBI Guard After Probe of Kidnap Plot". Chicago Tribune. December 2, 1970. 
  304. ^ "Vote SST Speed Curb Over Land". Chicago Tribune. December 3, 1970. 
  305. ^ "Nixon Pledges Help for NATO". Chicago Tribune. December 4, 1970. 
  306. ^ "Nixon Acts On Oil Prices". Chicago Tribune. December 5, 1970. 
  307. ^ Maclean, John (December 6, 1970). "Nixon Urges Senate to Free Funds for SST". Chicago Tribune. 
  308. ^ Executive Order 11571—Modifying Executive Order No. 6868 of October 9, 1934, as Amended, Designating the Authority to Carry out the Provisions of the District of Columbia Alley Dwelling Act (December 8, 1970)
  309. ^ Beckman, Aldo. "Harlow Quits Post As Nixon Counselor". Chicago Tribune. 
  310. ^ "Vows GIs Won't Fight in Cambodia". Chicago Tribune. December 11, 1970. 
  311. ^ "N. Viet Warned By Nixon". Chicago Tribune. December 11, 1970. 
  312. ^ "Nixon Names Rumsfield Counsellor". Chicago Tribune. December 11, 1970. 
  313. ^ "Vice President to Go to Governors Parley". Chicago Tribune. 
  314. ^ "Nixon Seeks Family Aid". Chicago Tribune. December 14, 1970. 
  315. ^ "3 Senators, Laird Clash on POW Raid". Chicago Tribune. December 12, 1970. 
  316. ^ Beckman, Aldo (December 15, 1970). "Kennedy Out, Connally Gets Treasury Job". Chicago Tribune. 
  317. ^ "Agnew Sees Dem Aid to Nixon". Chicago Tribune. December 15, 1970. 
  318. ^ "Nixon to Congress: Act". Chicago Tribune. December 17, 1970. 
  319. ^ "Americans Told to Avoid Polish Tour". Chicago Tribune. December 19, 1970. 
  320. ^ "Veto of Job Bill Upheld". Chicago Tribune. December 22, 1970. 
  321. ^ 471 - Statement on Signing the Department of Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriation Act, 1971. (December 22, 1970)
  322. ^ Proclamation 4025—Modifying Proclamation No. 3279, Relating to Imports of Petroleum and Products (December 22, 1970)
  323. ^ Executive Order 11574—Administration of Refuse Act Permit Program (December 23, 1970)
  324. ^ "Nixon Asks Yule Peace". Chicago Tribune. December 25, 1970. 
  325. ^ "Congress Approves Defense Fund Bill". Chicago Tribune. December 30, 1970. 
  326. ^ Beckman, Aldo (December 31, 1970). "Nixon Gets Clean Bill of Health". Chicago Tribune. 
  327. ^ "Offer Compromise to Help Lockheed". Chicago Tribune. December 31, 1970. 
  328. ^ "Nixon Watches TV Bowl Games and Signs 66 Bills". Chicago Tribune. January 2, 1971. 
  329. ^ "Major Battles Put Off; Pay Raise Vetoed". Chicago Tribune. January 3, 1971. 
  330. ^ Warden, Philip (March 24, 1971). "A Defeat for Nixon". Chicago Tribune. 
  331. ^ "Pentagon Papers - Vietnam War - HISTORY.com". HISTORY.com. Retrieved 2017-02-04. 
  332. ^ "Nixon announces trip to China - Jul 15, 1971 - HISTORY.com". HISTORY.com. Retrieved 2017-02-04. 
  333. ^ "Laird Meets With U.S. Officials In Saigon". Herald-Journal. November 4, 1971. 
  334. ^ "Nixon Administration Reportedly Seeks Revision In Water". Herald-Journal. November 9, 1971. 
  335. ^ "White House Eyes Social Security System Revision". Herald-Journal. November 17, 1971. 
  336. ^ "Senate Votes To Grant Nixon Import Authority". Herald-Journal. November 17, 1971. 
  337. ^ "Connally Calls Freeze A Resounding Success". Herald-Journal. November 17, 1951. 
  338. ^ "Senate Confirms Butz's Nomination". Herald-Journal. December 3, 1971. 
  339. ^ "President Vetoes Child-Care Program". Herald-Journal. December 10, 1971. 
  340. ^ "Congress Passes Tax Cut Bill, Sends It to Nixon". Herald-Journal. December 10, 1971. 
  341. ^ "Nixon Signs Tax Bill Into Law". Herald-Journal. December 11, 1971. 
  342. ^ Rehnquist Wins Senate Approval (December 11, 1971)
  343. ^ Packard Resigns Post As Deputy Secretary of Defense (December 12, 1971)
  344. ^ U.N. Would Be Branded 'Failure' Explains Rogers (December 13, 1971)
  345. ^ Starr, Frank (January 3, 1972). "Infiltration is Blamed". Chicago Tribune. 
  346. ^ "Reports Nixon's Fury on India". Chicago Tribune. January 4, 1972. 
  347. ^ Beckman, Aldo (January 5, 1970). "U.S. Will Regain Leading Maritime Role, Nixon Says". Chicago Tribune. 
  348. ^ "Order Raises for U.S. Workers". Chicago Tribune. January 12, 1972. 
  349. ^ Beckman, Aldo (January 14, 1972). "70,000 More GIs to Quit Viet by May 1, Nixon Says". Chicago Tribune. 
  350. ^ "Nixon Unveils Vast U.S. Drug Program to Stamp Out Pushers". Chicago Tribune. January 29, 1972. 
  351. ^ "Nixon Sends in His 'Plays' to Kissinger". Chicago Tribune. January 30, 1972. 
  352. ^ "No Draft Before April, Laird Says". Chicago Tribune. January 31, 1972. 
  353. ^ "Richard Nixon — A Timeline » Richard Nixon Foundation". Richard Nixon Foundation. Retrieved 2017-02-04. 
  354. ^ "Schultz to Get Expanded Cabinet Room". Chicago Tribune. December 2, 1972. 
  355. ^ "Three Aides Fired at Indian Bureau". Chicago Tribune. December 3, 1972. 
  356. ^ "State Face U.S. Welfare Aid Cut for Failure to Check Recipients". Chicago Tribune. December 5, 1972. 
  357. ^ "U.S. raises poverty level guidelines". Chicago Tribune. January 2, 1973. 
  358. ^ Farrar, Fred (January 3, 1973). "May have bombed hospital: U.S". Chicago Tribune. 
  359. ^ Beckman, Aldo (January 4, 1973). "Congress warned it may prolong war by opposition". Chicago Tribune. 
  360. ^ "Nixon and top aides discuss war, peace". Chicago Tribune. January 5, 1973. 
  361. ^ Beckman, Aldo (January 6, 1973). "Nixon briefs Congress leaders on peace talks". Chicago Tribune. 
  362. ^ "Senate, House count electoral vote: it's Nixon". Chicago Tribune. January 7, 1973. 
  363. ^ Farrar, Fred (January 9, 1973). "Only 5,000 more needed in draft, Laird claims". Chicago Tribune. 
  364. ^ Farrar, Fred (January 10, 1973). "U.S. denies new bombing". Chicago Tribune. 
  365. ^ Beckman, Aldo. "Nixon OKs FTC chief's quitting". Chicago Tribune. 
  366. ^ Rohrbach, Edward (January 12, 1973). "Phase 3 lifts most controls". Chicago Tribune. 
  367. ^ Beckman, Aldo (January 13, 1973). "FIght between Congress and White House heats up". 
  368. ^ Beckman, Aldo (January 15, 1973). "Haig is sent to brief Thieu". Chicago Tribune. 
  369. ^ Beckman, Aldo. "No Kissinger trips this week: Ziegler". Chicago Tribune. 
  370. ^ "S. Viets expect Nixon truce declaration by Friday". Chicago Tribune. January 17, 1973. 
  371. ^ Beckman, Aldo (January 18, 1973). "Reports of truce tomorrow denied". Chicago Tribune. 
  372. ^ Beckman, Aldo. "Kissinger set 'to complete' peace pact". Chicago Tribune. 
  373. ^ "Viet Nam cease-fire no guarantee of peace: Laird". Chicago Tribune. 
  374. ^ Beckman, Aldo. "Nixon plans to increase press meetings". Chicago Tribune. 
  375. ^ George Lenczowski, American Presidents and the Middle East, (Duke University Press: 1990), p. 131
  376. ^ 351 - Joint Statement on Economic, Industrial, and Technological Cooperation Between the United States and Romania. (December 5, 1973)
  377. ^ 347 - Remarks Announcing Establishment of the Federal Energy Office. (December 4, 1973)
  378. ^ 352 - Statement on Signing a Veterans Disability and Death Pension Bill. (December 6, 1973)
  379. ^ "Nixon signs national speed limit into law". History Channel. January 2, 1974. 
  380. ^ Beckman, Aldo (January 4, 1970). "Nixon plans personal oil crisis role". Chicago Tribune. 
  381. ^ "Nixon refuses tape order". Chicago Tribune. January 5, 1974. 
  382. ^ Fabricio, Roberto (January 6, 1974). "Barker tells of tap on Soviet". Chicago Tribune. 
  383. ^ "Ford hints 'deal' on tapes subpoena". Chicago Tribune. January 7, 1974. 
  384. ^ "Oil price rollback U.S. Hope: Simon". Chicago Tribune. January 7, 1974. 
  385. ^ Beckman, Aldo. "$300 billion Nixon budget". Chicago Tribune. 
  386. ^ Beckman, Aldo (January 10, 1974). "Nixon invites 8 allied nations to energy meeting next month". Chicago Tribune. 
  387. ^ "Nixon determined to spend no more time on Watergate". Chicago Tribune. January 10, 1974. 
  388. ^ "Security leaks confirmed". Chicago Tribune. January 12, 1974. 
  389. ^ "'Greasing wheels' of peace: Kissinger, Sadat confer". Chicago Tribune. January 12, 1974. 
  390. ^ Maclean, John (January 13, 1974). "Hopes high as Henry, Golda talk". Chicago Tribune. 
  391. ^ "Nixon offers Kissinger spying data". Chicago Tribune. January 15, 1974. 
  392. ^ Orr, Richard. "'74 economy to grow, Nixon aide tells farmers". Chicago Tribune. 
  393. ^ "FBI to probe gap in tape". Chicago Tribune. January 17, 1974. 
  394. ^ "Nixon aide asked if Dean knew of taping system". Chicago Tribune. January 18, 1974. 
  395. ^ "Nixon tapes case to jury". Chicago Tribune. January 19, 1974. 
  396. ^ "Another staff shakeup is planned by Nixon". Chicago Tribune. January 19, 1974. 
  397. ^ Young, Robert (January 20, 1974). "No gasoline rationing seen, Nixon tells U.S". Chicago Tribune. 
  398. ^ "Nixon delays State of Union talk". Chicago Tribune. January 21, 1974. 
  399. ^ Maclean, John (January 23, 1974). "Kissinger predicts end to oil embargo by Arabs". Chicago Tribune. 
  400. ^ "$7.6 billion aid to education set in Nixon budget". Chicago Tribune. January 25, 1974. 
  401. ^ Daniel, Clifton. "Shultz's resigning predicted". Chicago Tribune. 
  402. ^ "Nixon's health fine, Pat says". Chicago Tribune. January 29, 1974. 
  403. ^ "President asks increase in benefits for veterans". Chicago Tribune. January 29, 1974. 
  404. ^ "Nixon faces order to appear in court". Chicago Tribune. January 30, 1974. 
  405. ^ Davis, Robert (January 30, 1974). "Shultz doubts that Nixon will be impeached or resigned". Chicago Tribune. 
  406. ^ Beckman, Aldo (January 31, 1974). "End probe of Watergate, move ahead, Nixon urges". Chicago Tribune. 
  407. ^ Dombrowski, Louis (February 2, 1974). "Nixon plan for '74: flexible economy". Chicago Tribune. 
  408. ^ "Nixon bill launches privacy fight". Chicago Tribune. February 3, 1974. 
  409. ^ "Shultz sees rate on inflation taking dive". Chicago Tribune. February 4, 1974. 
  410. ^ "Nixon budget: $304 billion". Chicago Tribune. February 5, 1974. 
  411. ^ "Defense chief hints new U.S.-Soviet atom race". Chicago Tribune. February 6, 1974. 
  412. ^ "Nixon urges action on health plan". Chicago Tribune. February 7, 1974. 
  413. ^ Message to the Congress Transmitting Annual Report of Activities Under the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970 (February 7, 1974)
  414. ^ Memorandum About the Annual Report on Federal Executive Boards. (February 8, 1974)
  415. ^ Remarks About Negotiations To End Independent Truck Stoppages. (February 9, 1974)
  416. ^ Radio Address About Proposed Transportation Legislation. (February 9, 1974)
  417. ^ Kelly, Harry (March 2, 1974). "7 indicted in Watergate". Chicago Tribune. 
  418. ^ "White House statement". Chicago Tribune. 
  419. ^ "Don't tie trade, Russ policy: Schultz". Chicago Tribune. March 5, 1974. 
  420. ^ Warden, Philip (March 5, 1974). "Loops-Indiana link gets $60 million". Chicago Tribune. 
  421. ^ 69 - Veto of the Energy Emergency Bill. (March 6, 1974)
  422. ^ 70 - The President's News Conference (March 6, 1974)
  423. ^ 71 - Statement on Signing a Bill Providing for Development and Preservation of Water Resources. (March 7, 1974)
  424. ^ 72 - Radio Address About a Special Message to the Congress Proposing Campaign Reform Legislation. (March 8, 1974)
  425. ^ Beckman, Aldo. "Sunday gas is back: Nixon". Chicago Tribune. 
  426. ^ "Moscow trip view pessimistic: Henry". Chicago Tribune. 
  427. ^ "Nixon picks new envoy to Sweden". Chicago Tribune. March 22, 1974. 
  428. ^ "Nixon proposes new bills to ease clean air laws". Chicago Tribune. March 23, 1974. 
  429. ^ "2 to testify in tax probe". Chicago Tribune. March 25, 1974. 
  430. ^ "Nixon yields to Jaworski on subpoena". Chicago Tribune. March 28, 1974. 
  431. ^ "Bill to protect consumer may get Nixon veto". Chicago Tribune. March 29, 1974. 
  432. ^ "Nixon yields to Jaworski on subpena". Chicago Tribune. March 30, 1974. 
  433. ^ "U.N. Vow-insure Golan pact". Chicago Tribune. June 2, 1974. 
  434. ^ "Nixon to begin trip to Mideast June 11; will visit 5 nations". Chicago Tribune. June 4, 1974. 
  435. ^ "27-year-old 'enemies list' ended by Nixon". Chicago Tribune. June 5, 1974. 
  436. ^ "This Week in History: First US presidential visit to Israel". The Jerusalem Post | JPost.com. Retrieved 2017-02-04. 
  437. ^ "Nixon Inspects Palm Beach Estate Willed to U.S". New York Times. July 8, 1974. 
  438. ^ Jones, Brendan. "COURT SAYS NIXON EXCEEDED POWER ON IMPORT SURTAX". New York Times. 
  439. ^ Charlton, Linda. "NIXON TESTIMONY IS READ AT TRIAL". New York Times. 
  440. ^ "Nixon Names Judge Here". New York Times. 
  441. ^ "NEW GAP IS FOUND ON NIXON'S TAPE". New York Times. July 12, 1974. 
  442. ^ Wooten, James T. "Nixon Pledges Victory In a Call to 1,500 at Rally". New York Times. 
  443. ^ "Nixon Selects James Dow For Promotion in F.A.A". New York Times. 
  444. ^ Statement About Signing the Emergency Livestock Credit Act of 1974 (July 26, 1974)
  445. ^ Remarks on Presenting the Presidential Medal of Freedom to Charles LeRoy Lowman (July 27, 1974)
  446. ^ Kelly, Harry (July 29, 1974). "OK 2d impeaching article". Chicago Tribune. 
  447. ^ Elsasser, Glen (July 30, 1974). "Connally indicted in dairy payoffs". Chicago Tribune. 
  448. ^ Executive Order 11796—Continuing the Regulation of Exports (July 30, 1974)
  449. ^ White House Statement on the Signing of an International Agreement on Cyprus (July 30, 1974)
  450. ^ "White House concedes impeachment likely". Chicago Tribune. August 1, 1974. 
  451. ^ Proclamation 4305—National Forest Products Week, 1974 (July 31, 1974)
  452. ^ Nixon Presidential Library and Museum statement (August 1, 2014)
  453. ^ "Nixon surrenders 2d batch of tapes". Chicago Tribune. August 3, 1974. 
  454. ^ "Nixon may take major impeachment step". Lodi News-Sentinel. August 5, 1974. 
  455. ^ "Reagan appeals to Nixon". Lodi News-Sentinel. August 7, 1974. 
  456. ^ Herbers, John (1974-08-08). "Nixon Resigns". The New York Times. New York. 
  457. ^ "The Watergate Story | Nixon Resigns". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2017-02-04. 

External links

  • Miller Center Nixon Presidential Timeline
U.S. presidential administration timelines
Preceded by
L. B. Johnson
Nixon presidency
1969–1974
Succeeded by
Ford
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