Timeline of the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season

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A map of the Atlantic Ocean depicting the tracks of sixteen tropical cyclones
Track map of all Atlantic tropical cyclones in 2016

The 2016 Atlantic hurricane season was the costliest, as well as the first above-average, Atlantic hurricane season in four years. It featured the highest number of deaths since the 2008 season and also yielded the highest number of named storm landfalls on the United States since that year.[1][2] The season officially began on June 1 and concluded on November 30, dates which conventionally delimit the period during each year when a majority of tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic Ocean.[3] The season's first cyclone, Alex, developed on January 12, while the final storm of the season, Otto, ultimately dissipated on November 26.[4]

A total of 16 tropical depressions were recorded, of which 15 further intensified into tropical storms. Of those 15, a total of seven strengthened into hurricanes, while four attained their peaks as major hurricanes.[nb 1] Activity began with Alex which, upon making landfall in the Azores, became the first January landfalling tropical cyclone since Hurricane Alice in the 1954 season.[6] In June, tropical storms Colin and Danielle became the earliest third and fourth named storms, respectively, on record.[7][8] Hermine moved ashore the coastline of Florida as a Category 1 hurricane on September 2, ending the record hurricane drought that began in the state after the 2005 season's Hurricane Wilma.[9] In late September and early October, Hurricane Matthew wrought destruction throughout the Caribbean Sea and Southeastern United States, resulting in $15.09 billion (2016 USD) in damage and 603 deaths; it remains the ninth-costliest hurricane on record in the Atlantic, as well as the tenth-costliest in the United States.[10] In mid-October, Hurricane Nicole ascended to Category 4 intensity and remained a major hurricane while directly impacting Bermuda, the first storm of such strength to do so since Hurricane Fabian in the 2003 season.[11] The season concluded with Hurricane Otto, the latest-forming major hurricane on record in the Atlantic and the first cyclone to cross from the basin while maintaining tropical characteristics into the East Pacific since Hurricane Cesar–Douglas.[4]

This timeline documents tropical cyclone formations, strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, and dissipations during the season. It includes information that was not released throughout the season, meaning that data from post-storm reviews by the National Hurricane Center, such as a storm that was not initially warned upon, has been included.

Timeline of events

Hurricane Otto (2016) Hurricane Nicole (2016) Hurricane Matthew Tropical Storm Julia (2016) Hurricane Hermine Hurricane Earl (2016) Tropical Storm Danielle (2016) Tropical Storm Colin (2016) Tropical Storm Bonnie (2016) Hurricane Alex (2016) Saffir–Simpson scale

January

January 12

Satellite image of a well-defined hurricane near the Azores on January 14
Hurricane Alex at peak intensity on January 14

January 14

January 15

May

May 27

May 28

A disorganized Tropical Storm Bonnie positioned southeast of South Carolina on May 28
Tropical Storm Bonnie at its initial peak intensity on May 28

May 29

May 30

June

June 1

  • The 2016 Atlantic hurricane season officially begins.[3]

June 2

June 3

June 4

A track map of Tropical Storm Colin in early June
Storm path of Tropical Storm Colin during early June

June 5

June 7

A track map of Tropical Storm Danielle during late June
Storm path of Tropical Storm Danielle during late June

June 19

June 20

June 21

July

  • No tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic Ocean during the month of July.

August

August 2

August 3

Visible satellite imagery of an intensifying Hurricane Earl approaching Belize on August 3
Hurricane Earl approaching Belize on August 3

August 4

August 6

August 17

A track map of Tropical Storm Fiona during mid-August
Storm path of Tropical Storm Fiona during mid-August

August 19

August 22

August 23

August 24

August 25

August 27

Visible satellite imagery of Hurricane Gaston nearing major hurricane intensity on August 28
Hurricane Gaston on the cusp of major hurricane intensity on August 28

August 28

August 29

August 31

September

Visible satellite imagery of Hurricane Hermine approaching Florida on September 1
Hurricane Hermine approaching the coastline of Florida on September 1

September 1

September 2

September 3

September 12

September 13

September 14

A visible satellite imagery of Tropical Storm Julia over Georgia on September 14
Tropical Storm Julia over Georgia on September 14

September 15

September 16

September 17

September 19

A track map of Tropical Storm Karl throughout mid- to late September
Storm path of Tropical Storm Karl during mid- to late September

September 20

September 21

September 22

September 23

A track map of Tropical Storm Lisa during late September
Storm path of Tropical Storm Lisa during late September

September 25

September 28

September 29

September 30

October

Visible satellite imagery of Hurricane Matthew at Category 5 intensity on October 1
Hurricane Matthew at Category 5 intensity on October 1

October 1

October 4

October 5

October 6

October 7

October 8

A visible satellite image of Hurricane Nicole nearing Category 4 intensity on October 12
Hurricane Nicole shortly before attaining Category 4 intensity on October 12

October 9

October 11

October 12

October 13

October 14

October 18

Visible satellite imagery of Hurricane Otto moving ashore the coastline of Nicaragua on November 24
Hurricane Otto making landfall in Southeastern Nicaragua at peak intensity on November 24

November

November 20

November 21

November 23

November 24

November 25

November 30

  • The 2016 Atlantic hurricane season officially ends.[3]

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ A major hurricane is a storm that ranks as Category 3 or higher on the Saffir–Simpson scale.[5]
  2. ^ The figures for maximum sustained winds and position estimates are rounded to the nearest 5 units (knots, miles, or kilometers), following the convention used in the National Hurricane Center's operational products for each storm. All other units are rounded to the nearest digit.

References

  1. ^ First above-normal Atlantic hurricane season since 2012 produced five landfalling U.S. storms (Report). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. November 30, 2016. Archived from the original on April 28, 2017. Retrieved May 7, 2017.
  2. ^ Hurricane Season 2016 (Report). Cayman Islands National Weather Service. Retrieved May 7, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c Christopher W. Landsea; Neal Dorst; Erica Rule (June 2, 2011). "G: Tropical Cyclone Climatology". Hurricane Research Division: Frequently Asked Questions. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. G1) When is hurricane season ?. Archived from the original on June 15, 2006. Retrieved January 22, 2016.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Daniel P. Brown (January 30, 2017). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Otto (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 1, 2, 8, 9. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 28, 2017. Retrieved February 3, 2017.
  5. ^ Christopher W. Landsea; Neal Dorst (ed.) (June 1, 2016). "A: Basic Definitions". Hurricane Research Division: Frequently Asked Questions. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory. A3) What is a super-typhoon? What is a major hurricane ? What is an intense hurricane ?. Archived from the original on June 15, 2006. Retrieved January 5, 2017.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  6. ^ Bob Henson (January 15, 2016). "Astounding Alex Hits the Azores: January's First Atlantic Landfall in 61 Years". Weather Underground. Archived from the original on January 21, 2016. Retrieved January 22, 2016.
  7. ^ Dr. Jeff Masters (June 5, 2016). "Tropical Storm Colin Becomes Earliest "C" Storm in Atlantic History". Weather Underground. Archived from the original on November 26, 2016. Retrieved September 18, 2016.
  8. ^ Dr. Jeff Masters; Bob Henson (June 20, 2016). "Danielle the Atlantic's Earliest 4th Storm on Record; 115°-120° Heat in SW U.S." Weather Underground. Archived from the original on November 9, 2016. Retrieved September 18, 2016.
  9. ^ Jon Erdman (September 2, 2016). "Hurricane Hermine Ends Florida's Record-Smashing Hurricane Drought". The Weather Channel. Archived from the original on September 17, 2016. Retrieved September 18, 2016.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Stacy R. Stewart (April 7, 2017). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Matthew (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 2–5, 27–29. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 5, 2017. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Todd B. Kimberlain; Andrew S. Latto (February 15, 2017). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Nicole (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 2, 3, 8, 9. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 17, 2017. Retrieved February 16, 2017.
  12. ^ a b c d e f Eric S. Blake (September 13, 2016). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Alex (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 1, 2, 5, 6. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 3, 2017. Retrieved February 1, 2017.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Michael J. Brennan (October 14, 2016). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Bonnie (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 3, 2017. Retrieved February 4, 2017.
  14. ^ a b c d e Richard J. Pasch; Andrew B. Penny (January 17, 2017). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Colin (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 2, 6. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 28, 2017. Retrieved February 4, 2017.
  15. ^ a b c d e f John L. Beven II (September 8, 2016). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Danielle (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 2, 5. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 3, 2017. Retrieved February 5, 2017.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h Stacy R. Stewart (January 19, 2017). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Earl (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 2, 8. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 27, 2017. Retrieved February 5, 2017.
  17. ^ a b c d e Todd B. Kimberlain (November 11, 2016). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Fiona (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 5, 6. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 3, 2017. Retrieved February 17, 2017.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Daniel P. Brown (January 11, 2017). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Gaston (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 2, 3, 6, 7. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 28, 2017. Retrieved April 10, 2017.
  19. ^ a b John P. Cangialosi (December 6, 2016). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Depression Eight (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 2, 5, 6. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 28, 2017. Retrieved April 10, 2017.
  20. ^ a b c d e f Robbie J. Berg (January 30, 2017). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Hermine (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 2, 3, 12, 13. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 27, 2017. Retrieved April 10, 2017.
  21. ^ a b c d e Lixion A. Avila (January 3, 2017). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Ian (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 2, 4. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 28, 2017. Retrieved April 11, 2017.
  22. ^ a b c d e f Eric S. Blake (January 20, 2017). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Julia (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 2, 3, 5, 6. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 28, 2017. Retrieved April 11, 2017.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g Richard J. Pasch; David A. Zelinsky (January 4, 2017). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Karl (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 2, 5, 6, 7. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 28, 2017. Retrieved April 11, 2017.
  24. ^ a b c d e John L. Beven II (February 3, 2017). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Lisa (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. pp. 2, 5, 6. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 13, 2017. Retrieved April 12, 2017.

External links

Preceded by
2015
Atlantic hurricane season timelines
2016
Succeeded by
2017
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