Thomas Cartwright (politician)

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Thomas Cartwright (1671–1748) was an English politician, a Tory Member of Parliament for Northamptonshire 1695–1698 and 1701–1748.

Life

He was the son of William Cartwright, of Aynho in Northamptonshire and Bloxham in Oxfordshire, and his wife Ursula Fairfax, daughter of Ferdinando Fairfax, 2nd Lord Fairfax of Cameron; his sister Rhoda married Lord Henry Cavendish. He was admitted to St Catherine's College, Cambridge in 1687, had Samuel Bradford as his tutor, and was there for the Glorious Revolution.[1][2][3][4] He served as High Sheriff of Northamptonshire in 1693, and High Sheriff of Oxfordshire in 1699.[5]

Cartwright entered parliament for Northamptonshire through an expensive election in 1695; Lord Charles Spencer was a Whig candidate, but his father Robert Spencer, 2nd Earl of Sunderland baulked at the required expenditure. He was defeated in 1698, but in the second election of 1701 accepted a pact with Sir Justinian Isham, 4th Baronet that he had previously declined, and was an MP for the next 40 years.[5]

In the period 1707 to 1711, Cartwright had Aynhoe Park remodelled. The work is attributed to Thomas Archer, on grounds of style.[6] In 1711 the scholar Joseph Wasse came to be rector of Aynho, on the death of Matthew Hutton;[7][8] in a letter to Jean Le Clerc he praised Armine Cartwright's library.[9] Cartwright was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1716.[10] In 1723–5 Cartwright had Edward Wing rebuild the parish church at Aynho, apart from the tower.[11] He was also a donor to the Fenny Stratford church, commemorated on its ceiling.[12]

St Michael's Church in Aynho, rebuilt from 1723 for Thomas Cartwright

Cartwright died on 10 March 1748, aged 77, and was buried at Aynho.[12]

Family

Armine Crew, studio of Godfrey Kneller

Cartwright in 1699 married Armine Crew, daughter of Thomas Crew, 2nd Baron Crew. They had two sons and three daughters.[5] William Cartwright (died 1768) the Northamptionshire MP was their elder son.[13] William Ralph Cartwright was a great-grandson.[14]

Notes

  1. ^ D. R. Woolf (2000). Reading History in Early Modern England. Cambridge University Press. pp. 315–6 note 139. ISBN 978-0-521-78046-9. 
  2. ^ "Cartwright, Thomas (CRTT686T)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  3. ^ "Cavendish, Lord Henry (1673–1700), of Soho Square, Mdx. and Latimer, Bucks., History of Parliament Online". Retrieved 9 September 2015. 
  4. ^ Robert Masters; John Lamb (1831). Masters's History of the College of Corpus Christi ... in the University of Cambridge; with additional matter, and a continuation to the present time, by J. Lamb. p. 216. 
  5. ^ a b c "Cartwright, Thomas (1671–1748), of Aynho Park, Northants., History of Parliament Online". Retrieved 9 September 2015. 
  6. ^ Howard Colvin (1978). A Biographical Dictionary of British Architects 1600–1840. John Murray. p. 69. ISBN 0 7195 3328 7. 
  7. ^ Carter, Philip. "Wasse, Joseph". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/28808.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  8. ^ Broadway, Jan. "Hutton, Matthew". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/14309.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  9. ^ Epistolario. 4, 1719-1732 e indici generali / Jean Le Clerc, p. 183
  10. ^ Christa Jungnickel; Russell McCormmach (1 January 1996). Cavendish. American Philosophical Society. pp. 45 note 74. ISBN 978-0-87169-220-7. 
  11. ^ Nikolaus Pevsner; Bridget Cherry (1 March 1974). Northamptonshire. Yale University Press. p. 96. ISBN 978-0-300-09632-3. 
  12. ^ a b "Records of Buckinghamshire, Or, Papers and Notes on the History, Antiquities and Architecture of the County". Internet Archive. Buckinghamshire Archaeological Society. 1903. p. 387. Retrieved 9 September 2015. 
  13. ^ "Cartwright, William (c.1704–68), of Aynho, Northants., History of Parliament Online". Retrieved 9 September 2015. 
  14. ^ John Burke (1838). A genealogical and heraldic history of the extinct and dormant baronetcies of England, by J. and J.B. Burke. p. 3. 
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Sir St Andrew St John, Bt
John Parkhurst
Member of Parliament for Northamptonshire
1695–1698
With: Sir St Andrew St John, Bt
Succeeded by
Sir Justinian Isham, Bt
John Parkhurst
Preceded by
Sir Justinian Isham, Bt
John Parkhurst
Member of Parliament for Northamptonshire
1701–1707
With: Sir Justinian Isham, Bt
Succeeded by
Parliament of Great Britain
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Parliament of England
Member of Parliament for Northamptonshire
1707–1748
With: Sir Justinian Isham, Bt 1707–1730
Sir Justinian Isham, Bt 1730–1737
Sir Edmund Isham, Bt 1737–1748
Succeeded by
Sir Edmund Isham, Bt
Valentine Knightley
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