The Chronicles of Narnia (film series)

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The Chronicles of Narnia
The Chronicles of Narnia logo.svg
Directed by Andrew Adamson (12)
Michael Apted (3)
Joe Johnston (4)
Produced by Mark Johnson (13)
Philip Steuer (13)
Andrew Adamson (23)
Mark Gordon (4)
Douglas Gresham (4)
Vincent Sieber (4)
Screenplay by Ann Peacock (1)
Andrew Adamson (12)
Christopher Markus (13)
Stephen McFeely (13)
Michael Petroni (3)
David Magee (4)
Based on The Chronicles of Narnia
by C. S. Lewis
Starring Georgie Henley
Skandar Keynes
William Moseley
Anna Popplewell
Ben Barnes
Will Poulter
Tilda Swinton
Liam Neeson
Music by Harry Gregson-Williams (12)
David Arnold (3)
Cinematography Donald McAlpine (1)
Karl Walter Lindenlaub (2)
Dante Spinotti (3)
Edited by Sim Evan-Jones (12)
Rick Shaine (3)
Production
company
Distributed by
Release date
1: 9 December 2005
2: 16 May 2008
3: 10 December 2010
4 TBA
Running time
410 minutes (13)
Country United Kingdom
United States
Language English
Budget Total (3 films):
$560 million
Box office Total (3 films):
$1,580,364,900

The Chronicles of Narnia is a series of films based on The Chronicles of Narnia, a series of novels by C. S. Lewis. From the seven books, there have been three film adaptations so far—The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (2005), Prince Caspian (2008) and The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (2010)—which have grossed over $1.5 billion worldwide among them.

The series revolves around the adventures of children in the world of Narnia, guided by Aslan, a wise and powerful lion that can speak and is the true king of Narnia. The children heavily featured in the films are the Pevensie siblings, and a prominent antagonist is the White Witch (also known as Jadis).

The first two films were directed by Andrew Adamson and the third film was directed by Michael Apted. The fourth film was to be directed by Joe Johnston, but it was announced in 2018 that a new adaptation would be made for Netflix.

Development

C. S. Lewis never sold the film rights to the Narnia series during his lifetime, as he was skeptical that any cinematic adaptation could render the more fantastical elements and characters of the story realistically.[a] Only after seeing a demo reel of CGI animals did Douglas Gresham (Lewis's stepson and literary executor, and film co-producer) give approval for a film adaptation.

Although the plan was originally to produce the films in the same order as the book series' original publication, it was reported that The Magician's Nephew, which recounts the creation of Narnia, would be the fourth feature film in the series, instead of The Silver Chair. It was rumoured that The Magician's Nephew was chosen as an attempt to reboot the series, after the release of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader grossed less when compared to the two previous films.[1] In March 2011, Walden Media confirmed that they intended The Magician's Nephew to be next in the series, but stressed that it was not yet in development.[2]

In October 2011, Douglas Gresham stated that Walden Media's contract with the C. S. Lewis estate had expired, hinting that Walden Media's lapse in renegotiating their contract with the C. S. Lewis estate was due to internal conflicts between both companies about the direction of future films.[3]

On 1 October 2013, The C. S. Lewis Company announced a partnership with The Mark Gordon Company, and that The Chronicles of Narnia: The Silver Chair was officially in pre-production.[4]

Films

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (2005)

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, based on the novel of the same title, is the first film in the series. Directed by Andrew Adamson, it was shot mainly in New Zealand, though locations were used in Poland, the Czech Republic and the United Kingdom.

The story follows the four British Pevensie siblings, who are evacuated during the Blitz to the countryside, where they find a wardrobe that leads to the fantasy world of Narnia. There, they must ally with the lion Aslan against the forces of the White Witch, who has placed Narnia in an eternal winter.

The film was released theatrically on 9 December 2005 and on DVD on 4 April 2006 and grossed over $745 million worldwide.

The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (2008)

Prince Caspian, based on the novel of the same title, is the second film in the series and the last distributed by Walt Disney Pictures.

The story follows the same Pevensie children who were transported to Narnia in the previous film as they return to Narnia, where 1,300 years have passed and the land has been invaded by the Telmarines. The four Pevensie children aid Prince Caspian in his struggle for the throne against his corrupt uncle, King Miraz.

The film was released on 16 May 2008. It grossed $419 million worldwide.

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (2010)

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, based on the novel of the same title, is the first film in the series not to be co-produced by Disney, who dropped out over a budget dispute with Walden Media. In February 2009 it was announced that 20th Century Fox (which Disney is currently buying) would replace Disney for future installments. Directed by Michael Apted, the movie was filmed almost entirely in Australia.

The story follows the two younger Pevensie children as they return to Narnia with their cousin, Eustace Scrubb. They join the old king of Narnia, Caspian, in his quest to rescue seven lost lords and save Narnia from a corrupting evil that resides on a dark island.[5]

The film was released on 10 December 2010 (in RealD 3D in select theatres) and grossed over $415 million worldwide.

Main cast

Children

Other main characters

  • Liam Neeson as the voice of Aslan, the magnificent and majestically powerful lion who helps govern and maintain order in Narnia; a mystical world of his own creation. He is the only main character to appear in all seven books.
  • Tilda Swinton as Jadis, the White Witch; the former queen of Charn and a witch who ruled Narnia after being released in The Magician's Nephew and during the events of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.
  • Ben Barnes as Caspian X (Also known as "Prince Caspian"), the Telmarine prince who becomes King of Narnia after overthrowing his evil uncle Miraz.
  • Eddie Izzard and Simon Pegg as the voice of Reepicheep in Prince Caspian and The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, respectively: the noble and courageous mouse who fights for Aslan and the freedom of Narnia.

Crew

Role Film
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader The Chronicles of Narnia: The Silver Chair
2005 2008 2010 TBA
Director(s) Andrew Adamson Michael Apted Joe Johnston
Producer(s) Mark Johnson and Phillip Steuer Mark Johnson, Andrew Adamson and Phillip Steuer Mark Gordon, Douglas Gresham and Vincent Sieber
Writer(s) Ann Peacock, Andrew Adamson, Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely Andrew Adamson, Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely Christopher Markus, Stephen McFeely and Michael Petroni David Magee
Composer(s) Harry Gregson-Williams David Arnold TBA
Cinematographer(s) Donald McAlpine Karl Walter Lindenlaub Dante Spinotti TBA
Editor(s) Sim Evan-Jones Rick Shaine TBA
U.S. release date 9 December 2005 16 May 2008 10 December 2010 TBA
Distributor(s) Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures 20th Century Fox Netflix

Reception

Box office performance

Film Release date Box office gross All-time ranking Budget Ref.
North America Other territories Worldwide North America Worldwide
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe December 9, 2005 (2005-12-09) $291,710,957 $453,302,158 $745,013,115 78 86 $180 million [6]
The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian May 16, 2008 (2008-05-16) $141,621,490 $278,044,078 $419,665,568 363 236 $225 million [7]
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader December 10, 2010 (2010-12-10) $104,386,950 $311,299,267 $415,686,217 621 238 $155 million [8]
Total $537,719,397 $1,042,645,503 $1,580,364,900 $560 million [9][10]

Critical and public response

Film Rotten Tomatoes Metacritic CinemaScore
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe 76% (209 reviews)[11] 75 (39 reviews)[12] A+[13]
The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian 67% (189 reviews)[14] 62 (34 reviews)[15] A−[13]
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 50% (161 reviews)[16] 53 (33 reviews)[17] A−[13]

Future

On October 3, 2018, it was announced that Netflix and the C. S. Lewis Company had made a multi-year agreement to develop a new series of film and TV adaptations of The Chronicles of Narnia. [18]

The Silver Chair

After Walden Media's contract of the series' film rights expired in 2011, The C. S. Lewis Company announced on 1 October 2013 that it had entered into an agreement with The Mark Gordon Company to produce an adaptation of The Silver Chair. Mark Gordon and Douglas Gresham, along with Vincent Sieber, the Los Angeles based director of The C. S. Lewis Company, would serve as producers and work with The Mark Gordon Company on developing the script.[4] On 5 December 2013, it was announced that David Magee would write the screenplay.[19] In July 2014, the official Narnia website allowed the opportunity for fans to suggest names for the Lady of the Green Kirtle, the main antagonist. The winning name was to be selected by Mark Gordon and David Magee for use in the final script of The Silver Chair.[20]

The film's producers have called the film a reboot in reference to the fact that the film has a new creative team not associated with those who worked on the previous three films.[21][22] On 9 August 2016, it was announced that Sony's TriStar Productions and Entertainment One Films will finance and distribute the fourth film with The Mark Gordon Company (which eOne owns) and The C. S. Lewis Company.[23] In April 2017, it was announced that Joe Johnston had been hired to direct The Silver Chair.[24] During an interview with Red Carpet News TV, producer Mark Gordon revealed scarce details about the new technologies and setting that would be used for the upcoming film.[25]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ A general dislike of cinema is seen in Collected Letters, Vol. 2, a letter to his brother Warren on March 3, 1940, p. 361; see also All My Road Before Me, June 1, 1926, p. 405

References

  1. ^ Moring, Mark (April 7, 2011). "The Lion, the Witch, and the Box Office". Christianity Today. Retrieved May 1, 2011.
  2. ^ "'Narnia': Walden, Fox in discussions on 'The Magician's Nephew'". Inside movies. EW. 23 Oct 2011.
  3. ^ "Gresham Shares Plans for Next Narnia Film". Narnia Web. May 2012.
  4. ^ a b "Fourth "Chronicles of Narnia" Movie in Works from Mark Gordon Co". Deadline. Oct 2013.
  5. ^ Alexonx (10 November 2010). "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader-Spectacular trailer". filmissimo.it. Archived from the original on 2012-03-14. Retrieved 10 November 2010.
  6. ^ "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (2005)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved 2012-08-18.
  7. ^ "The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (2008)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved 2012-08-18.
  8. ^ "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (2010)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved 2012-08-18.
  9. ^ "The Chronicles of Narnia Movies at the Box Office". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved November 6, 2017.
  10. ^ "'Narnia' Vs. 'Narnia'". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved November 6, 2017.
  11. ^ "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (2005)". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 1 July 2016.
  12. ^ "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved 13 October 2012.
  13. ^ a b c "Cinema score". Retrieved 21 February 2015.
  14. ^ "The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (2008)". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 13 October 2012.
  15. ^ "The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved 13 October 2012.
  16. ^ "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (2010)". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 1 July 2016.
  17. ^ "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved 13 October 2012.
  18. ^ Otterson, Joe (October 3, 2018). "'Chronicles of Narnia' Series, Films in the Works at Netflix". Variety. Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  19. ^ "'Narnia' Sequel Taps David Magee to Write Script". The Wrap. 5 July 2013. Retrieved 4 October 2018.
  20. ^ "Enter The Silver Chair Movie Contest!". Narnia.com.
  21. ^ Foutch, Haleigh (12 January 2016). "Chronicles of Narnia: The Silver Chair to Reboot the Franchise". Collider. Retrieved 4 October 2018.
  22. ^ Trendacosta, Katharine (12 January 2016). "With This Chronicles of Narnia News, the Word 'Reboot' Is Officially Gibberish". io9. Gawker Media. Retrieved 4 October 2018.
  23. ^ Fleming, Jr, Mike (9 August 2016). "TriStar, Mark Gordon & eOne Revive 'The Chronicles Of Narnia' With 'The Silver Chair'". Deadline. Retrieved 4 October 2018.
  24. ^ Kroll, Justin (26 April 2017). "'Captain America' Director Joe Johnston Boards 'Narnia' Revival 'The Silver Chair'". Variety. Retrieved 4 October 2018.
  25. ^ Casiple, Necta (11 October 2017). "'The Chronicles of Narnia: The Silver Chair' update: Mark Gordon drops teasers about setting and visual effects". Christian Today. Retrieved 4 October 2018.

External links

  • The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe on IMDb
  • The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian on IMDb
  • The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader on IMDb
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