The Boat Race 2019

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The Boat Race 2019
Date 7 April 2019
Umpire Rob Clegg
Umpire Richard Phelps

The Boat Race 2019 (also known as The Cancer Research UK Boat Race for the purposes of sponsorship) will take place on 7 April 2019.[1] Held annually, The Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the universities of Oxford and Cambridge along a 4.2-mile (6.8 km) tidal stretch of the River Thames in south-west London. For the fourth time in the history of the event, the men's, women's and both reserves' races will all be held on the Tideway on the same day.

Background

Map of the Championship Course
The Championship Course along which, for the fourth time in the history of the event, the men's, women's and both reserves' races will be conducted on the same day

The Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing competition between the University of Oxford (sometimes referred to as the "Dark Blues")[2] and the University of Cambridge (sometimes referred to as the "Light Blues").[2] First held in 1829, the race takes place on the 4.2-mile (6.8 km) Championship Course, between Putney and Mortlake on the River Thames in south-west London.[3] The rivalry is a major point of honour between the two universities; the race is followed throughout the United Kingdom and broadcast worldwide.[4][5] Cambridge will go into the race as champions, having won the 2018 race by a margin of three lengths,[6] and leading overall with 83 victories to Oxford's 80 (excluding the 1877 race, officially a dead heat though claimed as a victory by the Oxford crew).[7][8]

It will be the fourth time in the history of The Boat Race that all four senior races – the men's, women's, men's reserves' and women's reserves' – will be held on the same day and on the same course along the Tideway. Prior to 2015, the women's race, which first took place in 1927, was usually held at the Henley Boat Races along the 2,000-metre (2,200 yd) course. However, on at least two occasions in the interwar period, the women competed on the Thames between Chiswick and Kew.[9] Cambridge's women went into the race as reigning champions, having won the 2018 race by three lengths, and led 43–30 overall.[6]

The autumn reception was held at the Guildhall in London on 8 November 2018. As Cambridge's women had won the previous year's race, it was Oxford's responsibility to offer the traditional challenge to the Cambridge University Women's Boat Club (CUWBC). To that end, Eleanor Shearer, President of Oxford University Women's Boat Club (OUWBC), laid down the gauntlet to Abigail Parker, her Cambridge counterpart. Cambridge's victory in the men's race meant that Felix Drinkall, President of Oxford University Boat Club (OUBC), challenged Dara Alizadeh, President of Cambridge University Boat Club (CUBC).[10]

The women's race will be umpired by Richard Phelps, a former rower who successfully represented Cambridge in the 1993, 1994 and 1995 races. He has previously umpired the men's race once, in 2014. The 165th men's race will be umpired by Rob Clegg who rowed for the Dark Blues in the 1994, 1995 and 1996 races. He umpired the women's race in 2016.[11] The women's reserve race will be overseen by Tony Reynolds, while the men's reserve race will be umpired by multiple Olympic gold-medallist Matthew Pinsent.[11] As well as rowing for Oxford in the 1990, 1991 and 1993 races,[12][13][14] he was assistant umpire in the 2012 race before umpiring the 2013 men's race and the 2018 women's race.[15][16][17]

On 30 January 2019, the Royal National Lifeboat Institution was announced as the official charity partner for the event.[18]

Coaches

The Cambridge men's crew coaching team is led by their chief coach Rob Baker who had previously coached CUWBC to victories in both the 2017 and 2018 races.[19] He is assisted by Richard Chambers, silver medallist in the men's lightweight coxless four at the 2012 Summer Olympics.[19] Donald Legget, who rowed for the Light Blues in the 1963 and 1964 races acts as a supporting coach, along with coxing coach Henry Fieldman (who steered Cambridge in the 2013 race) and the medical officer Simon Owens.[19] Sean Bowden is chief coach for Oxford, having been responsible for the senior men's crew since 1997, winning 12 from 19 races. He is a former Great Britain Olympic coach and coached the Light Blues in the 1993 and 1994 Boat Races.[20]

Cambridge women's chief coach is Robert Weber, who joined Cambridge University from Hamilton College in New York where he was Head Rowing Coach and Associate Professor of Physical Education. He is assisted by Paddy Ryan and Astrid Cohnen.[21] Oxford women's chief coach is the former OUBC assistant coach Andy Nelder who previously worked with Bowden for eleven years.[22]

Trials

Dates for the trials, where crews are able to simulate the race proper on the Championship Course, were announced on 23 November 2018.[23]

Women

Marie Curie in c. 1920
Bertha von Suttner
CUWBC's trial boats were named after women Nobel Prize winners Marie Curie (left) and Bertha von Suttner

Oxford's women's trial took place on the Championship Course on 7 December, between Blitzen and Comet, named after two of Santa Claus's reindeer.[24] Comet, coxed by the OUWBC president Eleanor Shearer, took an early lead and held a length's advantage by Craven Cottage. Extending their lead to two lengths by Hammersmith Bridge, Comet moved across Blitzen to control the remainder of the race. In deteriorating conditions, Comet coped better and won by three lengths.[25]

Cambridge's trial race was held on the Championship Course on 10 December, between Curie and Suttner, named after Nobel Prize winners Marie Curie and Bertha von Suttner.[26] Suttner won the toss and elected to start from the Surrey station. Curie held an early lead but a push from Suttner towards Hammersmith Bridge levelled the race, with the umpire Richard Phelps having to warn both crews for encroachment. A clash of blades halfway down Chiswick Eyot resulted in Suttner's bow rower being unseated; Curie took advantage and rowed several lengths clear before the umpire halted the race. After the restart from Chiswick Pier, Curie held a slight lead at Barnes Bridge and took advantage of the bend of the river to pass the finishing line with a clear-water advantage.[27]

Men

An 1893 Vanity Fair caricature of William Fletcher, after whom one of the Oxford trial boats was named

Oxford's trial race was held on the Championship Course on 7 December, between Reggie and Flea, named in commemoration of Second Lieutenant Reginald Fletcher, who rowed for OUBC in the 1914 race, and Lieutenant Colonel William Fletcher, a member of the Dark Blue crew in four consecutive races between 1890 and 1893.[24] It took place without Oxford's president, Felix Drinkall, who was absent due to injury. After a close start and in windy, wet conditions, Flea took a slight advantage while Reggie was warned for encroachment. More aggressive steering from Reggie around the Hammersmith bend saw them take a half-length lead which they maintained past St Paul's School. Flea pushed along Chiswick Eyot and in calmer waters re-took the lead and were a length ahead as they rowed away from Barnes Bridge. They increased their lead to pass the finishing line nearly two lengths ahead of Reggie.[28]

Cambridge's men's trial took place on the Championship Course on 10 December, between Roger and Lancelot, also named in honour of two alumni killed in action during the First World War.[26] Lieutenant Colonel Roger Kerrison had rowed in the 1893 and 1894 races while Lieutenant Lancelot Ridley coxed in both the 1913 and 1914 races.[26] Roger won the toss and elected to start from the Surrey station, with the race taking place in "testing conditions".[29] Following warnings from the umpire Rob Clegg, Roger was forced to steer off-course, allowing Lancelot to take advantage, and hold a lead of more than a length by Hammersmith Bridge. They continued to dominate the race and crossed the finishing line several lengths ahead of Roger.[29]

Buildup

The official fixtures to be raced in advance of The Boat Race were announced on 11 February 2019.[30]

Women

Men

References

  1. ^ "The Cancer Research UK Boat Race". The Boat Race Company Limited. Archived from the original on 20 May 2011. Retrieved 23 July 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Dark Blues aim to punch above their weight". The Observer. 6 April 2003. Archived from the original on 11 September 2014. Retrieved 9 July 2014.
  3. ^ Smith, Oliver (25 March 2014). "University Boat Race 2014: spectators' guide". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 1 July 2014. Retrieved 9 July 2014.
  4. ^ "Former Winnipegger in winning Oxford–Cambridge Boat Race crew". CBC News. 6 April 2014. Archived from the original on 24 September 2014. Retrieved 9 July 2014.
  5. ^ "TV and radio". The Boat Race Company Limited. Archived from the original on 6 October 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2014.
  6. ^ a b "Boat Race – Results". The Boat Race Company Limited. Archived from the original on 12 July 2016. Retrieved 26 July 2016.
  7. ^ Higginson, Marc (6 April 2014). "Boat Race 2014: Oxford emphatically beat Cambridge". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 24 March 2015. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  8. ^ "Classic moments – the 1877 dead heat". The Boat Race Company Limited. Archived from the original on 26 October 2014. Retrieved 8 April 2014.
  9. ^ Quarrell, Rachel (8 February 2012). "Boat Race becomes 'the Boat Races' as women and men's university events are combined for 2015". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 16 December 2014. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  10. ^ "Challenges accepted". The Boat Races Company Limited. 10 November 2018. Archived from the original on 20 November 2018. Retrieved 19 November 2018.
  11. ^ a b "Umpires confirmed for 2019". The Boat Race Company Limited. 5 December 2018. Archived from the original on 10 January 2019. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  12. ^ Rosewell, Mike (31 March 1990). "Odds weigh heavily against Cambridge". The Times (63668). p. 51.
  13. ^ Rosewell, Mike (30 March 1991). "Cambridge may have edge". The Times (63979). p. 33.
  14. ^ Rosewell, Mike (23 March 1993). "Oxford select new cox in Boat Race surprise". The Times (64599). p. 48.
  15. ^ Quarrell, Rachel (7 April 2012). "University Boat Race 2012: Oxford call for re-race after protester causes chaos on River Thames". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 13 June 2014. Retrieved 19 May 2014.
  16. ^ "Boat Race 2013: Oxford v Cambridge". BBC Sport. 31 March 2013. Archived from the original on 14 July 2014. Retrieved 24 June 2014.
  17. ^ McVeigh, Niall (23 March 2018). "Boat Race 2018: Cambridge beat Oxford in men's and women's race – as it happened". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 24 March 2018. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  18. ^ McGinty, Áine (30 January 2019). "The Boat Race respects the water in partnership with the RNLI". Chiswick Herald. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  19. ^ a b c "Staff". Cambridge University Boat Club. Archived from the original on 14 January 2019. Retrieved 13 January 2019.
  20. ^ "Staff – OUBC". Oxford University Boat Club. Archived from the original on 14 January 2019. Retrieved 14 January 2019.
  21. ^ "Coaching and Support Team – CUWBC". Cambridge University Women's Boat Club. Archived from the original on 13 January 2019. Retrieved 14 January 2019.
  22. ^ "Coaching Team". Oxford University Women's Boat Club. Archived from the original on 14 January 2019. Retrieved 14 January 2019.
  23. ^ "Trial Eights dates confirmed". The Boat Race Company Limited. 23 November 2018. Archived from the original on 10 January 2019. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  24. ^ a b "Oxford Trial 8s – time change and crew announcement". The Boat Race Company Limited. 6 December 2018. Retrieved 11 January 2019.
  25. ^ "OUWBC Trial Eights report". The Boat Race Company Limited. 7 December 2018. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  26. ^ a b c "Cambridge Trial Eights – crews announced". The Boat Race Company Limited. 9 December 2018. Retrieved 11 January 2019.
  27. ^ "CUWBC Trial Eights report". The Boat Race Company Limited. 9 December 2018. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  28. ^ "OUBC Trial Eights report". The Boat Race Company Limited. 7 December 2018. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  29. ^ a b "CUBC Trial Eights report". The Boat Race Company Limited. 11 December 2018. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  30. ^ "2019 fixtures announced". The Boat Race Company Limited. 11 February 2019. Retrieved 14 February 2019.

External links

  • Official website
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Boat_Race_2019&oldid=883276546"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Boat_Race_2019
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "The Boat Race 2019"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA