Germanic paganism

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Emil Doepler's depiction of the Second Merseburg Charm, 1905. In the charm, gods from continental Germanic mythology heal a horse.

Germanic religion refers to the indigenous religion of the Germanic peoples from the Iron Age until Christianisation during the Middle Ages. Rooted in Proto-Indo-European religion, Proto-Germanic religion expanded during the Migration Period, yielding extensions such as Old Norse religion among the North Germanic peoples, Continental Germanic paganism among the continental Germanic peoples, and Anglo-Saxon paganism among the Old English, a West Germanic people. Among the East Germanic peoples, traces of Gothic paganism may be discerned from scant artifacts and attestations. According to John Thor Ewing, as a religion it consisted of "individual worshippers, family traditions and regional cults within a broadly consistent framework".[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ Ewing, Thor (2008). Gods and Worshippers in the Viking and Germanic World. Tempus. p. 9. 

Further reading

  • Grimm, Jacob (2004), Teutonic Mythology, translated by Stallybrass, James S., Dover Publications 
  • Buchholz, Peter (1968), "Perspectives for Historical Research in Germanic Religion", History of Religions, University of Chicago Press, 8 (2): 111–138 
  • North, Richard (1991), Pagan words and Christian meanings, Rodopi, ISBN 978-90-5183-305-8 


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