Talk:Whoopie pie

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Large-scale Edits

Please explain the reasons why you undid my previous changes to this article. Thanks!

Please see guide to improving articles and sourcing. Flowanda | Talk 00:04, 1 October 2009 (UTC)

Apocryphal

I don't think that "Apocryphal" is the appropriate term, and is not used in the referenced NYT article. -- Anonymous —Preceding unsigned comment added by 12.37.39.74 (talk) 20:34, 3 June 2009 (UTC)

Whoopie pie history

I notice that Maine is noplace mentioned in the whoopie pie's history the account of the amish first making the pies is currently disputed, and as of january 26th Maine has won the right to make the pie it's state dessert. - Knowledgekid87 (talk) 00:34, 27 January 2011 (UTC)

Check this out: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704132204576136593240752596.html?mod=WSJ_hp_editorsPicks_5#articleTabs%3Darticle WIERDGREENMAN (talk) 22:19, 14 February 2011 (UTC)

I am pretty sure the original recipe is from the Pa.Dutch. My mother has been making whoopie pies since I was a little kid using a recipe that has been in her family for well over 100 years. Which by my calculations predates the 1925 origin they claim in Maine. I will tell you something else. None of the commercial pies I have ever tried are anything like the original. The original pies are not at all fluffy like cake. They are very dense and heavy, and a lighter brown in color. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Archer6831 (talkcontribs) 23:35, 19 February 2011 (UTC)

I'm from Lancaster County originally, and had my first whoopie pie there. I've since lived in NY, MD and VA, and while there are things in all locations that are referred to as whoopie pies (or, in a Sheetz store, a Gob), they aren't the same. Wegman's sells something they call a whoopie pie, but its just cake with fake vanilla filling. Whoopie pie filling isn't just cake icing... ! Histreebuff (talk) 20:41, 25 February 2011 (UTC)HistreetBuff

There's no conclusion. I tried to be neutral with http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whoopie_pie#Origin_Controversy.WIERDGREENMAN (talk) 20:56, 25 February 2011 (UTC)

NPOV doesn't mean balancing two sides to make them even, especially when one side is clearly the winner. Of the sources listed, clearly the New York Times is amongst the most authoritative. And the 2009 article clearly states that "Food historians believe whoopie pies originated in Pennsylvania, where they were baked by Amish women and put in farmers’ lunchboxes" but that how it arrived "traveled to Maine is a mystery, however." 69.86.106.215 (talk) 03:57, 4 March 2011 (UTC)

Chocolate Cremes by Little Debbie

Oreo Cakesters should be mentioned in the "In popular culture" section

Oreo Cakesters (along with other commercially produced whoopies)played a huge role in popularizing the pastry. If someone wants to take the time out of their lives to somehow verify this, I think it would be warranted. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.250.245.59 (talk) 07:31, 9 February 2011 (UTC)

German Origin

If it does have a German origin, it could be a variation of Bienenstich (bee sting), which is a bright dough sandwich cake filled with a sort of pudding-like creme and topped with almonds and honey. There are also other types of sandwich cakes in Germany, some involving chocolate (like chocolate cake filled with peach or apricot jam). 79.227.161.251 (talk) 11:25, 22 August 2012 (UTC)

Gobs

The term "gob" is redirected here as a regional word for a whoopie pie. I disagree with that, but will have to come back later for that discussion. However, the term "Gobs" is a trademarked name owned by the Dutch Maid Bakery in Johnstown, PA. See this link for details. [1]

This should probably be referenced somewhere in this article.

PhotoBiker (talk) 00:09, 13 June 2013 (UTC)

I am from the Pittsburgh area and I can concur that the word gob is used for whoopie pies in this area. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2601:541:201:6F2:B505:298F:B380:AFD1 (talk) 01:45, 11 May 2017 (UTC)

  1. ^ http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/sectionfront/life/johnstown-bakery-owns-rights-to-gobs-254350/
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