Talk:Fibular hemimelia

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Difference with congenital absence of the fibula?

So what's the difference between this and congenital absence of the fibula? Should the two articles be merged?

have suggested merge Tubefurnace (talk) 12:10, 1 August 2012 (UTC)

Merger proposal

I'm not an expert, but this seems like an obvious case for merge, unless the two things are really different conditions. Tubefurnace (talk) 12:12, 1 August 2012 (UTC)

It is in fact a case for compulsory merge because two articles about the same subject violates the rule against such content forks. Roger (talk) 08:48, 3 August 2012 (UTC)
The merge has been completed. Roger (talk) 10:38, 3 August 2012 (UTC)

What about the tibia?

Presume it missing too is concomitant. Why is it called fibular if it does affect the much larger other bone and if not why doesn't the tibia suffice? 76.180.168.166 (talk) 15:23, 15 February 2013 (UTC)

The answer apparently is that there is a range of designations of clinically presented types of the condition. Rarely, the tibia may be more or less normal. More commonly the entire osteo process of the lower leg and foot is abnormal with fusions, missing processes, undeveloped tibia, unusual joints, etc. At some point I would expect these types will be enumerated here. 76.180.168.166 (talk) 15:21, 19 February 2013 (UTC)
An answer from a person with Fibular Hemimelia and have been a amputee since birth (30 years). I can say that the tibia could suffice but the dangers of fracture and muscle and/or nerve damage may occur. The actual defect is not a standard but a wide range of possibilities; I was lacking a fibula, ankle and foot bones, but have all muscles (I would wiggle toe muscles before revision) with a curved tibia (banana shaped). I have not met another person with the same exact defect; different sides, no curved tibia, or club foot, or even a shorten fibula. There has not been many studies done and I find myself having to explain to doctors what I have, as they have not heard of it. More studies need to be done to find out what is the cause and a better way to treat than bone lengthening or amputation. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.127.61.91 (talk) 12:41, 26 May 2013 (UTC)
Thank you for that informative reply. I indented your response. Since it's a ubiquitous condition in vertebrates, I imagine it will continue to occur and that the ultimate treatment after birth would be to grow the missing bone tissue in culture from the patients cells. 76.180.168.166 (talk) 10:49, 22 August 2013 (UTC)
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