Talk:Dozen

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"stórhundrað"

The Icelandic dictionary "Íslensk orðabók fyrir skóla og skrifstofur" mentions "stórhundrað". "stórhundrað" means 120. Regards Gangleri 21:49, 2004 Sep 26 (UTC)

Moved from article

Cannot agree with the Latin origination of the word. Really it is one of the oldest worlds in Hindo-European languagies, with the meaning "(full) right hand". One of the oldest method of counting is not by fingers, but by the fingers phalanges, using the thumb as a pointer. It allowed count rather big quantities (up to gross), using only two hands.

Removed possible copyvio

I removed the following paragraph:

Dozen
The word dozen is a contraction of the Latin Duodecim (two + ten). This root also appears in dodecagon (from duodecagon) and duodenum, the first part of the intestine that is about twelve inches long. Some math and language historians think that a dozen is one of the earliest primitive groupings, perhaps because there are approximately a dozen cycles of the moon in a cycle of the sun. It appears to be the basis of many larger values that were developed by many cultures. A shock was 60, or five dozen (a dozen for each finger on one hand) and many cultures had a "great hundred" [see hundred] of 120 or ten dozen (a dozen for each finger on both hands). The Romans used a fraction system based on 12 and the smallest part, an uncil became our word for an ounce. Charlemagne established a monetary system that had a base of twelve and twenty and the remnants persist in many places. In English money today 100 pence equals a Pound, but only a few short years ago a Pound was divided into 20 shillings of 12 pence each.

It may have been taken from http://www.pballew.net/arithme1.html (copyvio???).

Some of the material I have merged into the present article; some I have added to Duodecimal and 12 (number).--Niels Ø 13:38, 21 March 2006 (UTC)

thers no synonyms and antonyms 68.155.151.230 22:36, 2 November 2006 (UTC)Bob greoge

Baker's dozen

The description here of a baker's dozen being 12 plus one to taste is inconsistent with the wikipedia article on baker's dozen, which states that 13 were sold to avoid short measures in English medieval law. Not my place to determine either way, but there should be some consistency here. 212.248.246.18 13:18, 26 September 2007 (UTC)


Totally agree. Says in the intro that a dozen is 12. yet then a baker's dozen is 12 (one more than a standard dozen)?!?Bensnowden (talk) 13:10, 12 August 2011 (UTC)

Both are the case. That tradition (selling 13 per nedieval law) is antiquated. As far as I know...no one refers to a baker's dozen these days in this way. The common definition is a dozen plus one (as an extra bonus or one for the chef). It shouldn't be hard to revise the article Shabidoo | Talk 15:53, 9 October 2015 (UTC)

Disambiguation

Last line: "This method for accounting was introduced by the Babylonians and its still in use today." Does this refer to base 10 or base 12 ? Suggest the pronoun "this" be replaced to clarify. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 121.45.164.59 (talk) 09:57, 8 August 2009 (UTC)

it could be both, things change from time to time, cultures to cultures but base was originally 10 in most cultures, whatever! —Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.107.0.139 (talk) 18:50, 23 April 2010 (UTC)

Weird news

EU to ban selling eggs by the dozen. — Monedula (talk) 20:54, 28 June 2010 (UTC)

Merge with Baker's dozen and Decimal Dozen

The Dozen article is not about the number twelve; that is the subject of the 12 (number) article. The Dozen article is about the word dozen, its etymology, and its usage. Baker's dozen and decimal dozen are simply two different cultural uses of the word dozen. Baker's dozen and Decimal Dozen should therefore be merged here. Neelix (talk) 14:40, 8 July 2011 (UTC)

Mathematical rationale for baker's dozen

I removed the speculative mathematical rationale for baker's dozen, which albeit plausible, reads like original research. It's fascinating, and if it's been published in a reliable source it should be put back. –Pnm (talk) 16:04, 21 April 2012 (UTC)

Wait, what?

How does counting your digits with your thumbs magically add two extra digits? Weren't Mesopotamians also equipped with the usual ten? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.12.144.81 (talk) 15:54, 10 July 2012 (UTC)

You don't count the digits; you count the segments of your digits. This system is also easily extensible to tetradecimal (counting the thumb's segments as well) or hexadecimal (counting the endpoints of the segments). As such you can count on your fingers for every human-scale even base, namely {6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16} (the first and last are arguably only marginally human-scale). Double sharp (talk) 15:13, 17 November 2013 (UTC)

Can we get any sort of citation for this idea? If not, I will remove the sentence as OR. Imaginatorium (talk) 09:26, 28 May 2016 (UTC)

Baker's dozen again

I removed the quote claiming the baker's dozen originated in America, and referencing Forest, Heather (1988). The Baker's Dozen: A Colonial American Tale. This is a story book for (American) children, and not a reliable historical source. The webidence points towards a mediaeval English custom, with all sorts of specific references, yet tantalising not-quite-definite sources. But see Worshipful Company of Bakers (website) and Assize of Bread and Ale. Imaginatorium (talk) 02:57, 9 October 2015 (UTC)

External links modified

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  • Added archive https://web.archive.org/20061210005528/http://www.bartleby.com:80/61/24/D0372400.html to http://www.bartleby.com/61/24/D0372400.html

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Other uses

This section contains very little material -- mostly just musings. Should it just be deleted? The Etymology section says that the various corresponding words in other languages can be used "as indefinite quantifiers to mean 'about twelve'..." -- this whole section does not really expand on this notion in any useful, sourced way. Possibly a couple of literary quotes would be a much better contribution, but where to find them? Imaginatorium (talk) 09:07, 28 May 2016 (UTC)

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