Sumbawa people

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Sumbawa people
Samawa people / Semawa people / Tau Samawa
COLLECTIE TROPENMUSEUM Een gezin van Soembawa op de trap van zijn woning TMnr 10005956.jpg
A Sumbawa family on the stairs of their home, pre-1943.
Total population
(433,000[1])
Regions with significant populations
 Indonesia (Sumbawa Island)
Languages
Sumbawa language, Indonesian language
Religion
Islam (predominantly), Doii Donggo (folk religion), Hinduism, Buddhism
Related ethnic groups
Balinese people, Sasak people

Sumbawa or Samawa people are an ethnic group of people who live in the western and central region of Sumbawa Island, which comprises West Sumbawa Regency and Sumbawa Regency. The Sumbawa people refer themselves as Tau Samawa people and their language is Sumbawa language.[2] Neither the Bima nor the Sumbawa people have alphabets of their own; they use the alphabets of the Bugis and the Malay language indifferently.[3] The majority of the Sumbawa people practice Islam. The Sumbawa people once established their own government which became the Sumbawa Sultanate and lasted until 1931.[4] Sakeco music always plays a special role in the custom of Sumbawa people.[5]

Lifestyle

The main activities of the Sumbawa people are agriculture and animal husbandry.[6] They usually cultivate the earth by slash-and-burn method. Plow and irrigation methods are very rarely used. Sumbawa people traditionally grow corn (which has become a major industry),[7] beans, peppers, vegetables, onions, garlic, coffee and fruit trees. Cattle breeding is dominant in livestock breeding,[6] but the breeding of buffaloes, small horned livestock and poultry are also developed. Sumbawa eat mostly plant based foods, while consumption of meat takes place during festivals and other celebrations. They live in permanent settlements, as well as in temporary ones. Traditional accommodation is divided into several parts. There is no ceiling, instead an attic is made over the female part of the house. In the fields, temporary settlements are often located; where women, old people and children also reside. Among the Sumbawa people, traditional beliefs and rituals are still preserved.

Family

Elements of the traditional wedding ceremony have been preserved, such as bride price, a joint bathing of the bride and groom and a common dining table. A traditional family is monogamous. However in principle polygamy is not forbidden, but it is practiced quite rarely because of the big sum of money that the bridegroom must pay for the bride.

References

  1. ^ "Sumbawa in Indonesia". Joshua Project. Retrieved 2016-02-12. 
  2. ^ Lalu Mantja (1984). Sumbawa Pada Sasa Dulu: Suatu Tinjauan Sejarah. Rinta. ISBN 979-15833-8-2. 
  3. ^ James Cowles Prichard (1874). Researches into the Physical History of Mankind Volume 5: Containing Researches Into the History of the Oceanic and of the American Nations. Sherwood, Gilbert, and Piper. ASIN B0041T3N9G. 
  4. ^ Miriam Coronel Ferrer (1999). Sama-Sama: Facets Of Ethnic Relations In South East Asia. Third World Studies Center, University Of The Philippines. ISBN 971-91111-7-8. 
  5. ^ Indonesia Membangun, Volume 4. Dumas Sari Warna. 1988. 
  6. ^ a b Khee Giap Tan, Mulya Amri, Nurina Merdikawati & Nursyahida Ahmad (2016). 2015 Annual Competitiveness Analysis and Development Strategies for Indonesian Provinces. World Scientific. p. 262. ISBN 98-132-0739-6. 
  7. ^ "W. Nusa Tenggara to double corn output in 2017". The Jakarta Post. 14 January 2017. Retrieved 2017-05-11. 

External links

  • Kabupaten SUMBAWA
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