Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee Monument

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Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee Monument
Jackson and Lee Monument, Front.JPG
Artist Laura Gardin Fraser
Year 1948
Medium Bronze
Location Baltimore, Maryland
Coordinates Coordinates: 39°19′28″N 76°37′11″W / 39.32431°N 76.61983°W / 39.32431; -76.61983
Owner City of Baltimore

The Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee Monument, often referred to simply as the Jackson and Lee Monument or Lee and Jackson Monument, was a double equestrian statue of Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee, formerly located on the west side of the Wyman Park Dell in Charles Village in Baltimore, Maryland, alongside a forested hill, similar to the topography of Chancellorsville, Virginia, where Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee met before the Battle of Chancellorsville in 1863. The statue was removed on August 16, 2017, on the order of Baltimore City Council following political pressure, but the base still remains. The present location of the monument is unknown and some city council members called for all Confederate monuments to be destroyed.

Significance

The Jackson and Lee Monument was the first double equestrian statue in the United States.[1] Artist Laura Gardin Fraser was the only woman sculptor selected out of five other men to create the monument. Notable architect John Russell Pope was commissioned to design the base of the monument.

Background

Funding for the statue was secured by Colonial Trust Company owner J. Henry Ferguson before he died in 1928. Ferguson provided $100,000 for the erection of the monument.[2] It was dedicated in 1948 in a ceremony at which Governor William Preston Lane Jr. and Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro Jr. spoke.[3]

The monument was located on the west side of the Wyman Park Dell along Art Museum Drive from its dedication until its removal by the Baltimore City Government.

Removal

The statue's empty pedestal with the fallen unauthorized artwork of a pregnant African-American woman two days after removal of the statue.

After the 2015 Charleston church shooting, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake organized a commission to evaluate removal of the city's four confederate monuments.[4] In January 2016, the commission decided that the Jackson and Lee Monument, along with William Henry Rhinehart's Roger B. Taney Sculpture in Mount Vernon Place would be removed.[5]

On August 15, 2017, Baltimore city council voted unanimously to deconstruct these monuments.[6] The Jackson and Lee Statue was subsequently removed by Whiting Turner construction on August 16, 2017, but the base remains intact.[7] Activists replaced the monument with a rendition of a pregnant African-American woman, created by artist Pablo Machioli, which collapsed shortly thereafter. The pedestal was also repeatedly vandalized with politically motivated graffiti stating "Smash White Supremacy" and "Black Lives Matter".[8]

Inscription

The base of the sculpture featured the following inscription:[1]

SO GREAT IS MY CONFIDENCE IN/ GENERAL LEE THAT I AM WILLING TO/ FOLLOW HIM BLINDFOLDED / STRAIGHT AS THE NEEDLE TO THE POLE/ JACKSON ADVANCED TO THE EXECUTION/ OF MY PURPOSE

(West steps:) THE PARTING OF GENERAL LEE AND/ STONEWALL JACKSON ON THE EVE/ OF CHANCELLORSVILLE

(East steps:) GIFT OF J. HENRY FERGUSON OF MARYLAND.

(North steps:) THEY WERE GREAT GENERALS AND/ CHRISTIAN SOLDIERS AND WAGED/ WAR LIKE GENTLEMEN.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Monument Commission". Baltimoreplanning.wix.com. Retrieved 2016-01-15. 
  2. ^ "Baltimore's Confederate Memory & Monuments · Baltimore's Civil Rights Heritage". Baltimoreheritage.github.io. Retrieved 2016-01-15. 
  3. ^ Singman, Brooke (August 24, 2017). "Nancy Pelosi's dad helped dedicate Confederate statue". The New York Post. Retrieved August 26, 2017. 
  4. ^ "monumentcommission". Baltimoreplanning.wix.com. Retrieved 2016-01-15. 
  5. ^ "Baltimore City commission recommends removal of two Confederate monuments". Baltimoresun.com. Retrieved 2016-01-15. 
  6. ^ "Council resolves "to deconstruct" Confederate monuments". baltimorebrew.com. Retrieved 2017-08-16. 
  7. ^ "Baltimore Removes Confederate Statues Overnight". wsj.com. Retrieved 2017-08-16. 
  8. ^ "Replacement for removed monument is down in Baltimore". wusa9.com. Retrieved 2017-08-20. 
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