Steve Hamilton

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Steve Hamilton
Pitcher
Born: (1935-11-30)November 30, 1935
Columbia, Kentucky
Died: December 2, 1997(1997-12-02) (aged 62)
Morehead, Kentucky
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 23, 1961, for the Cleveland Indians
Last MLB appearance
August 16, 1972, for the Chicago Cubs
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 40–31
Earned run average 3.05
Strikeouts 531
Teams
Steve Hamilton
Personal information
Born (1935-11-30)November 30, 1935
Columbia, Kentucky
Died December 2, 1997(1997-12-02) (aged 63)
Morehead, Kentucky
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Listed weight 190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school Charlestown (Charlestown, Indiana)
College Morehead State (1954–1958)
NBA draft 1958 / Round: 2 / Pick: 8th overall
Selected by the Minneapolis Lakers
Playing career 1958–1960
Position Forward / Center
Number 30
Career history
19581960 Minneapolis Lakers
Career NBA statistics
Points 368 (4.5 ppg)
Rebounds 278 (3.4 rpg)
Assists 43 (0.5 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Steven Absher Hamilton (November 30, 1935 – December 2, 1997) was a Major League Baseball (MLB) and National Basketball Association (NBA) player.[1]

He was mostly a relief pitcher during his 12 MLB seasons, including a stint as the New York Yankees closer during the 1968 season. In 421 career games (17 starts) from 1961 to 1972 he had a 40–31 record with 42 saves and a 3.05 earned run average. He pitched 1 inning during the Yankees 1963 World Series loss to the Los Angeles Dodgers and 2 innings during the Yankees 1964 World Series loss to the St. Louis Cardinals, including 1 save. He also pitched in the 1971 NLCS for the San Francisco Giants.

His one complete game shutout was on August 5, 1966, against the Cleveland Indians, while pitching for the New York Yankees. He gave up 5 hits, walked 1 and struck out 3. It was one of only 3 starts he had in the 1966 season. Late in his career Hamilton threw the famed "folly-floater", a high, slow eephus pitch.[1] Other pitchers that have thrown a lob pitch include Rip Sewell and Dave LaRoche.

From 1958 to 1960 he was a power forward/center for the Minneapolis Lakers.[1] He played for the 1958/59 team that lost to the Boston Celtics during the 1959 NBA Finals. Over 2 seasons he averaged 4.5 points per game, 3.4 rebounds per game, and 0.5 assists per game.

After his major league career ended, he was a Detroit Tigers coach in 1975 and was the athletic director at his alma mater, Morehead State University. Hamilton died of colon cancer at age 63.

Hamilton is one of only two people to have played in both a World Series and an NBA finals. (The other person is Gene Conley, who, unlike Hamilton, won both a World Series [in 1957 with the Milwaukee Braves] and an NBA finals [from 1959 to 1961 with the Boston Celtics]. Conley is the only player to achieve both feats.)

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Litsky, Frank (December 4, 1997). "Steve Hamilton, 62, 'Floater' Pitcher for Yankees". New York Times. Retrieved February 19, 2011. 

External links

  • Career statistics and player information from MLB, or Baseball-Reference, or Baseball-Reference (Minors)
  • Retrosheet
  • Steve Hamilton at Find a Grave
Preceded by
Cot Deal
Detroit Tigers pitching coach
1975
Succeeded by
Fred Gladding
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