Steel Ball Run

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Steel Ball Run
Steel Ball issue.jpg
The Steel Ball Run debut issue of Weekly Shōnen Jump, featuring Gyro Zeppeli
スティール・ボール・ラン
(Sutīru Bōru Ran)
Manga
Written by Hirohiko Araki
Published by Shueisha
Demographic Shōnen, seinen
Magazine
Original run February 2, 2004April 19, 2011
Volumes 24 (List of volumes)
Wikipe-tan face.svg Anime and Manga portal

Steel Ball Run (Japanese: スティール・ボール・ラン, Hepburn: Sutīru Bōru Ran) is the reboot and seventh story arc of the Japanese manga series JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, written and illustrated by Hirohiko Araki. Set in 1890, it stars Gyro Zeppeli, a disgraced former executioner, and Johnny Joestar, a former hot-shot jockey who was shot and lost the use of his legs, as well as his fame and fortune. They, along with others, race across America for $50 million.

Originally the first 23 chapters (4 volumes) were serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump in 2004 simply under the title Steel Ball Run. Although the character's names are obviously related to the series, it was unclear if the story was a part of JoJo's Bizarre Adventure. However, when the series moved to Ultra Jump in 2005, it was officially announced as part 7 of JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, but in an alternate universe, like the following and current arc, JoJolion.

The 95 chapters were combined into 24 tankōbon volumes (volumes 81 to 104 of the entire series), following the trend set by the previous part, Stone Ocean, of starting over the volume count. A couple of chapters were adapted into a "Vomic" series, which has voice actors act over the manga pages as they are shown on screen.

Plot

The series is set in 1890 in an alternate reality from previous JoJo's Bizarre Adventure parts, where racing jockeys from all over the world flock to the United States to take part in the Steel Ball Run — a cross-country horse race from San Diego to New York City with a prize of fifty million dollars. Johnny Joestar, a former jockey who fell from glory after a shooting paralyzed him from the waist down, enters the race after meeting the mysterious Gyro Zeppeli to learn the secrets of the man's Spin technique which temporarily restored his mobility. While beginning as rivals, Johnny and Gyro become friends as they travel through the wilderness while fending off violent competitors.

As Gyro begins teaching Johnny the secrets of the Spin, his own background is explored through flashbacks. He is a former executioner from Naples who is competing in the Steel Ball Run not for his own gain, but to win the favor of the Neapolitan royalty and thus prevent the unjust execution of a young boy, Marco, who has been falsely accused of treason. The two continue their progression through the race, all the while being attacked by various assassins, terrorists and outlaws.

Although the Steel Ball Run is organized by the eccentric oil tycoon Stephen Steel, it is revealed that the race is backed by the United States government. Steel is unaware of the actual agenda of US President Funny Valentine: the race is a means for Valentine to collect the scattered pieces of a two-thousand-year-old corpse known as the Saint's Corpse (implied to be the body of Jesus Christ, brought America by Joseph of Arimathea) so he can use the reassembled body to achieve incredible power. Stephen's wife Lucy discovers this plot and finds out that Valentine already possesses one part of the Corpse, the heart.

After Johnny and Gyro encounter another piece of the Saint's Corpse, it is absorbed into Johnny's body and he develops a Stand, allowing him to fend off one of Valentine's minions. Later, they meet the mysterious racer Diego Brando (a counterpart to the character Dio Brando, a major antagonist in previous installments of the series), who obtains one of two Corpse eyes, while Gyro gains the other.

Lucy intercepts a message to Valentine about the Corpse parts, making her a target for his men. She is able to escape him and with Johnny and Gyro's help she finds one of the parts. With the information provided by Lucy, Johnny and Gyro decide to search for the next three Corpse parts while sending Lucy, with the advantage of Gyro's Corpse eye, to take the Heart from Valentine himself.

Meanwhile, Diego makes a deal with Valentine to help him deal with the traitor (who Valentine does not know is Lucy). Partnered with another racer, Diego attacks Johnny and Gyro. Gyro teaches Johnny how to use the Golden Ratio found in nature to amplify the power of the Spin, and he defeats the other racer with this technique, but Diego escapes and all but one of the Corpse parts are stolen by another racer, Hot Pants.

Johnny and Gyro are next forced to deal with a Stand based on the fable of The Honest Woodman by Aesop, which grants them a considerable fortune alongside another Corpse part but forces them to get rid of both before sunrise or else they will be trapped within an ancient tree forever and become the new users of the Stand, making the same deal with passersby. The duo spend the money hiring a mercenary force to fend off Valentine's henchmen, but Gyro is nearly lost forever until Johnny trades away the Corpse parts to the last survivor of Valentine's forces, saving Gyro's life but leaving them with nothing.

Lucy uses Hot Pants' Stand to disguise herself as Valentine's wife Scarlet, while Hot Pants steals several Corpse parts from Valentine, including the Heart.

Johnny and Gyro are led to a garbage dump by Hot Pants, only for all three to be nearly defeated by one of Valentine's men, who takes all of the parts they have collected. With the help of a vision of the Saint, Johnny's Stand develops new powers in combination with the Spin. Before he can win the battle, however, Valentine arrives and kills his own minion, then leaves along with all the Corpse parts except for the undiscovered head and the eyes possessed by Diego and Lucy. Upon returning to the Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Valentine uncovers Lucy's disguise and takes her captive after she fuses with the Corpse and seemingly becomes pregnant with the Corpse's head.

Lucy escapes from captivity, only to be lured into Valentine's clutches once again. Diego and Hot Pants ally against Valentine, chasing him and Lucy to a trainyard while being followed themselves by Johnny and Gyro. Diego and Hot Pants fight Valentine on the moving train but his Stand's ability prove too powerful and he kills both, throwing Hot Pants from the train and cutting Diego in half with the train's wheels when he attempts to do the same to Valentine. Meanwhile, Lucy begins to metamorphose into a being resembling the Saint's Corpse. This grants Valentine even further powers.

Johnny and Gyro arrive and battle Valentine. Valentine kills Gyro but Johnny's powers have reached their ultimate form and are able to pursue Valentine no matter what universe he tries to escape to. With no other choice he attempts to make a deal with Johnny, offering to resurrect Gyro by finding a version of him in another universe in exchange for the Corpse. Johnny nearly agrees but realizes that this is a trick after he notices Valentine holding a gun taken from another universe, which he intended to kill Johnny with if he let his guard down. Johnny kills Valentine but realizes somebody else has taken the Corpse, now separate from Lucy.

Pursuing this unknown enemy into the final stage of the Steel Ball Run, Johnny is shocked to find that it is an alternate version Diego Brando, taken from a different universe by Valentine and entrusted with the Corpse. Unlike the previous Diego, this one possesses the time-stopping Stand of Dio Brando. The new Diego is able to incapacitate Johnny and wins the race in first place. He brings the Corpse to Trinity Church, where Valentine intended to lock it in a vault so that its powers would protect America forever. At the last moment, Lucy arrives with the severed head of the previous Diego. The new Diego, unable to escape due to an injury Johnny gave him, fuses with his parallel self's head and disintegrates.

Stephen Steel rescues Johnny. Johnny, having regained his ability to walk through the power of his Stand and the Spin, leaves America to return Gyro's body to his family. On the boat he meets the Japanese racer Norisuke Higashikata, whose daughter Rina he later marries, leading to the events of Part 8, JoJolion.

Characters

  • Johnny Joestar[a] is a former horse racer from Kentucky, who is paralyzed from the waist down. He participates in the Steel Ball Run to follow Gyro Zeppeli and learn how to use his Spin technique, to be able to stand again, but for the most part, uses his horse Slow Dancer as his legs. He uses the Stand Tusk,[b] which allows him to shoot his finger nails as bullets.
  • Gyro Zeppeli[c] is a disgraced magistrate and executioner from the Kingdom of Naples, who participates in the Steel Ball Run to free someone who he believes has been wrongly imprisoned. He is a master of a mystical art called the Spin, which is channeled through the steel balls he throws, with both combative and medical effects.
  • Lucy Steel[d] is a fourteen-year-old girl who tries to help Johnny and Gyro, and is the wife of the Steel Ball Run promoter Stephen Steel.
  • Funny Valentine[e] is the 23rd President of the United States, and a former soldier. He uses the Stand Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap[f] (usually shortened to D4C), which allows him to travel between alternate dimensions when he is pressed between two objects.
  • Diego Brando,[g] nicknamed "Dio", is a Steel Ball Run participant from the United Kingdom, and a rival to Gyro and Johnny. He uses the Stand Scary Monsters [h], which allows him to transform into a Utahraptor. Later, an alternate version of Diego is summoned by Valentine. This Diego is far more similar to the original DIO, and even uses THE WORLD [i] as his Stand.
  • Hot Pants[j] is a Steel Ball Run participant from the United States, and a former nun. She uses the Stand Cream Starter,[k] which takes the form of a spray bottle that can turn flesh into a foam-like substance and spray it to fuse the flesh with people's bodies.
  • Wekapipo[l] is a former Neapolitan royal guard who is hired and partnered with the Stand user Magent Magent to protect Valentine. He uses the Spin, wielding a steel ball called Wrecking Ball, which can release smaller, blinding balls if the main ball is blocked or misses.
  • Stephen Steel[m] is the promoter of the Steel Ball Run and is the elderly husband of Lucy Steel.

Production

A 2013 photograph of Hirohiko Araki
The series was written and drawn by Hirohiko Araki.

Steel Ball Run was written and drawn by Hirohiko Araki,[1] and was originally serialized in Shueisha's Weekly Shōnen Jump magazine, until it was moved to their monthly seinen magazine Ultra Jump in 2004.[2][3] Araki found that the new, monthly schedule with longer chapters suited him better, as he was not as restricted in what he could draw and no longer had to write stories with momentum building up excitement for the next week's chapter, and had more flexibility to draw at his own pace.[3] Araki described the manga's theme as "seeking for satisfaction".[4] Like with other parts of JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, Araki also used "an affirmation that humanity is wonderful" as a theme, which he explained as a description for humanity's ability to grow and overcome hardships through one's strength and spirit, portrayed through people succeeding in fights through their own actions, without relying on machines or gods.[3]

Because the series follows a race across America, Araki had to split his research into three trips: one from the West Coast to the deserts, one from the Great Plains to the Mississippi River and Chicago, and one to New York. He said that it would have been impossible to get an understanding for the vast scale without having gone there personally, describing the scenery of the midwest as endless and unchanging. The feeling of distance made him think that if an enemy had approached, the open landscape would have meant that he could not have escaped due to a lack of places to hide, an experience he found useful when drawing the manga.[5]

Like other protagonists in the series, Johnny was designed to symbolize the part's story and setting, and to stand out among the previous protagonists in terms of appearance, clothing, and silhouette. He was not specifically planned to have a disability at the start of the production; rather, his disability was the result of the series' focus on protagonists growing through overcoming hardships, and Araki wanting to create a character who was forced to rely on people and horses during the race and had room to grow both mentally and physically.[3] Valentine was created as part of Araki noticing more and more that good and evil is not always easily distinguishable and taking a greater interest in the motivations for people who do bad things. He noted that Valentine's patriotism and goals seemed just and might line up with leaders in the real world, and that it is his sacrificial of powerless people to reach his goals that make him evil and completely unsuitable as a protagonist.[6] The concept of having the president of the United States fighting the main characters came from when Araki saw the film Independence Day, and liked the idea of a president who fights.[7]

Reception

Kono Manga ga Sugoi! recommended Steel Ball Run as a good place to start for people who have not read previous parts, due to how it serves as a reboot of the JoJo's Bizarre Adventure series, and appreciated how its move to the monthly seinen magazine Ultra Jump enabled Araki to write longer stories and depict things that would have been difficult to do in a shōnen magazine.[2] Erkael of Manga-News called the manga one of the best in the series, and said that it does not disappoint the reader at any point.[8] Anime News Network called Steel Ball Run an interesting take on the battle manga genre due to its positive portrayal of a hero with a disability, and found it, along with JoJolion, to represent a big shift in the evolution of Araki's art, following his earlier shift from muscle men to thinner characters and fashion.[3]

K. Thor Jensen of Geek.com called the portrayal of Johnny and Gyro's relationship one of the best platonic friendships in comics, citing their transition from rivals to close allies who make sacrifices for one another and help each other with their respective abilities.[9] Erkael liked the high speed and intensity of the story, saying that it was as if Araki wanted the reader to feel like they were part of the race themselves, and how the story eventually opens up to follow several different characters whose paths at times intersect, leading to a world that feels "rich and dense". They wrote that the lack of Stands early in the story, with Gyro instead using steel balls, was surprising but refreshing, and reminiscent of the hamon abilities featured in the first part in the JoJo's Bizarre Adventure series, Phantom Blood; they still enjoyed the shift in focus to Stand abilities later in the story, calling them "original and surprising".[8] Kono Manga ga Sugoi! liked the depiction of the landscapes Johnny and Gyro travel through, calling them "beautiful".[2]

Chapters

Original volumization

No. Title Japanese release date Japanese ISBN
1 (81) September 25, 1890: San Diego Beach
Issen Happyaku Kyūjū Nen Kugatsu Nijūgonichi San Diego Bīchi (1890年9月25日 サンディエゴビーチ)
May 20, 2004[1] ISBN 4-08-873601-X
  • 1. "The Steel Ball Run: Press Conference" (スティール・ボール・ラン 記者会見, Sutīru Bōru Ran Kisha Kaiken)
  • 2. "Gyro Zeppeli" (ジャイロ・ツェペリ, Jairo Tseperi)
  • 3. "Johnny Joestar" (ジョニィ・ジョースター, Jonī Jōsutā)
  • 4. "September 25, 1890: 3 Hours to Start" (1890年9月25日 スタート3時間前, Issen Happyaku Kyūjū Nen Kugatsu Nijūgonichi Sutāto San Jikan Mae)
  • 5. "1st Stage: 15,000 Meters" (1st. STAGE 15,000メートル, Fāsuto Sutēji 15,000 Mētoru)
  • 2 (82) 1st Stage: 15,000 Meters
    Fāsuto Sutēji 15,000 Mētoru (1st. STAGE 15,000メートル)
    May 20, 2004[10] ISBN 4-08-873613-3
    • 6. "The Dried-Up River; Diego Brando" (涸れた川;ディエゴ・ブランドー, Kareta Kawa; Diego Burandō)
    • 7. "Pocoloco and Sandman" (ポコロコとサンドマン, Pokoroko to Sandoman)
    • 8. "Crossing the Forest" (雑木林越え, Zōkibayashigoe)
    • 9. "Long, Long Downhill" (長い長い下り坂, Nagai Nagai Kudarizaka)
  • 10. "The Final Straight: 2000 Meters Left" (最終直線 残り2,000メートル, Saishū Chokusen Nokori Nisen Mētoru)
  • 11. "The Final Straight: 1000 Meters Left" (最終直線 残り1,000メートル, Saishū Chokusen Nokori Issen Mētoru)
  • "Steel Ball Run: How the Race Got Started" (スティール・ボール・ラン レース開催のいきさつ, Stīu Bōru Ran Rēsu Kaisai no Ikisatsu)[n]
  • 3 (83) 2nd Stage: Arizona Desert Crossing
    Sekondo Sutēji Arizona Sabaku Goe (2nd. STAGE アリゾナ砂漠越え)
    November 4, 2004[11] ISBN 4-08-873673-7
    • 12. "1st Stage: Disqualified From Victory" (1st. STAGE 優勝失格, Fāsuto Stēji Yūshō Shikaku)
    • 13. "The Sheriff's Request to Mountain Tim" (保安官 マウンテン・ティムへの依頼, Hoankan Maunten Timu e no Irai)
  • 14. "Across the Arizona Desert: Continuing Along the Shortest Route" (アリゾナ砂漠越え 最短ルートを進め, Arizona Sabaku Goe Saitan Rūto o Susume)
  • 15–17. "The Desert-Born Outlaws (1–3)" (砂漠で生まれたならず者 その①〜③, Sabaku de Umareta Narazumono Sono 1–3)
  • 4 (84) Gyro Zeppeli's Mission
    Jairo Tseperi no Shukumei (ジャイロ・ツェペリの宿命)
    November 4, 2004[12] ISBN 4-08-873689-3
    • 18–19. "The Devil's Palm (1–2)" (悪魔の手のひら その①〜②, Akuma no Tenohira Sono 1–2)
    • 20–21. "Gyro Zeppeli's Mission (1–2)" (ジャイロ・ツェペリの宿命 その①〜②, Jairo Tseperi no Shukumei Sono 1–2)
  • 22–23. "The Terrorist from a Distant Land (1–2)" (遠い国から来たテロリスト その①〜②, Tōi Kuni kara Kita Terorisuto Sono 1–2)
  • 5 (85) The President's Conspiracy
    Daitōryō no Inbō (大統領の陰謀)
    August 4, 2005[13] ISBN 4-08-873845-4
    • 24. "Interlude" (インタールード (間奏曲), Intārūdo (Kansōkyoku))
  • 25–27. "Tusk (1–3)" (牙(タスク) その①〜③, Tasuku Sono 1–3)
  • 6 (86) Scary Monsters
    Sukearī Monsutāzu (スケアリー モンスターズ)
    November 4, 2005[14] ISBN 4-08-873890-X
    • 28–30. "Scary Monsters (1–3)" (スケアリー モンスターズ その①〜③, Sukearī Monsutāzu Sono 1–3)
    7 (87) A Little Grave on the Wide, Wide Prairie
    Hiroi Hiroi Daisōgen no Chiisana Bohyō (広い広い大草原の小さな墓標)
    March 3, 2006[15] ISBN 4-08-874117-X
    • 31. "Scary Monsters (4)" (スケアリー モンスターズ その④, Sukearī Monsutāzu Sono 4)
    • 32. "3rd Stage: Cannon City" (3rd. STAGE ゴール.キャノン・シティ, Sādo Sutēji Gōru: Kyanon Shiti)
  • 33. "A Man's World (1)" (男の世界 その①, Otoko no Sekai Sono 1)
  • 8 (88) To a Man's World
    Otoko no Sekai e (男の世界へ)
    May 2, 2006[16] ISBN 4-08-874119-6
    • 34–35. "A Man's World (2–3)" (男の世界 その②〜③, Otoko no Sekai Sono 2–3)
  • 36. "The Green Tomb (1)" (緑色の墓標 その①, Midoriiro no Bohyō Sono 1)
  • 9 (89) A Stormy Night Is Coming
    Arashi no Yoru ga Yatte Kuru (嵐の夜がやってくる)
    September 4, 2006[17] ISBN 4-08-874147-1
    • 37. "The Green Tomb (2)" (緑色の墓標 その②, Midoriiro no Bohyō Sono 2)
  • 38–39. "Catch the Rainbow (On a Stormy Night...) (1–2)" (キャッチ・ザ・レインボー(嵐の夜に…) その①〜②, Kyatchi Za Reinbō (Arashi no Yoru ni...) Sono 1–2)
  • 10 (90) Illinois Skyline, Michigan Lakeline
    Irinoi Sukairain Mishigan Reikurain (イリノイ・スカイライン ミシガン・レイクライン)
    November 2, 2006[18] ISBN 4-08-874285-0
    • 40–42. "Silent Way (1–3)" (サイレント・ウェイ その①〜③, Sairento Wei Sono 1–3)
    11 (91) Make the Golden Rectangle!
    Ōgon Chōhōkei o Tsukure! (黄金長方形をつくれ!)
    March 2, 2007[19] ISBN 978-4-08-874336-3
    • 43–44. "Silent Way (4–5)" (サイレント・ウェイ その④〜⑤, Sairento Wei Sono 4–5)
  • 45. "The Promised Land: Sugar Mountain (1)" (約束の地 シュガー・マウンテン その①, Yakusoku no Chi Shugā Maunten Sono 1)
  • 12 (92) Conditions for the Body, Conditions for Friendship
    Itai e no Jōken Yūjō e no Jōken (遺体への条件 友情への条件)
    May 2, 2007[20] ISBN 978-4-08-874362-2
    • 46–47. "The Promised Land: Sugar Mountain (2–3)" (約束の地 シュガー・マウンテン その②〜③, Yakusoku no Chi Shugā Maunten Sono 2–3)
  • 48. "Tubular Bells (1)" (チューブラー・ベルズ その①, Chūburā Beruzu Sono 1)
  • 13 (93) Wrecking Ball
    Kowareyuku Tekkyū (壊れゆく鉄球)
    September 4, 2007[21] ISBN 978-4-08-874420-9
    • 49–50. "Tubular Bells (2–3)" (チューブラー・ベルズ その②〜③, Chūburā Beruzu Sono 2–3)
  • 51. "Wrecking Ball (1)" (壊れゆく鉄球 レッキング・ボール その①, Kowareyuku Tekkyū Rekkingu Bōru Sono 1)
  • 14 (94) The Victor's Rights
    Shōrisha e no Shikaku (勝利者への資格)
    December 4, 2007[22] ISBN 978-4-08-874438-4
    • 52–54. "Wrecking Ball (2–4)" (壊れゆく鉄球 レッキング・ボール その②〜④, Kowareyuku Tekkyū Rekkingu Bōru Sono 2–4)
  • 55. "The Victor's Rights" (勝利者への資格, Shōrisha e no Shikaku)
  • 15 (95) A Dream of Gettysburg
    Getisubāgu no Yume (ゲティスバーグの夢)
    May 2, 2008[23] ISBN 978-4-08-874518-3
    • 56–58. "Civil War (1–3)" (シビル・ウォー その①〜③, Shibiru Wō Sono 1–3)
  • 59. "A Dream of Gettysburg" (ゲティスバーグの夢, Getisubāgu no Yume)
  • 16 (96) Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap
    Itomo Tayasuku Okonawareru Egutsunai Kōi (いともたやすく行われる えげつない行為)
    September 4, 2008[24] ISBN 978-4-08-874574-9
    • 60–61. "Both Sides Now (1–2)" (ボース・サイド・ナウ その①〜②, Bōsu Saido Nau Sono 1–2)
    • 62. "Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap" (いともたやすく行われる えげつない行為, Itomo Tayasuku Okonawareru Egutsunai Kōi)
  • 63. "Seven Days in a Week" (7日で一週間, Nanoka de Ishūkan)[n]
  • 17 (97) D4C
    Dī Fō Shī (D4C(ディ・フォー・シー))
    March 4, 2009[25] ISBN 978-4-08-874648-7
    • 64–65. "Chocolate Disco (1–2)" (チョコレート・ディスコ その①〜②, Chokorēto Disuko Sono 1–2)
  • 66–68. "D4C (1–3)" (D4C(ディ・フォー・シー) その①〜③, Dī Fō Shī Sono 1–3)
  • 18 (98) Ticket to Ride
    Chiketto Tu Raido (涙の乗車券(チケット・ゥ・ライド))
    July 3, 2009[26] ISBN 978-4-08-874725-5
    • 69–70. "D4C (4–5)" (D4C(ディ・フォー・シー) その④〜⑤, Dī Fō Shī Sono 4–5)
  • 71–72. "Ticket to Ride (1–2)" (涙の乗車券(チケット・ゥ・ライド) その①〜②, Chiketto Tu Raido 1–2)
  • 19 (99) Don't Get Used to Having Money
    Okane Mochi ni wa Narenai (お金持ちにはなれない)
    November 4, 2009[27] ISBN 978-4-08-874769-9
    • 73–76. "D4C (6–9)" (D4C(ディ・フォー・シー) その⑥〜⑨, Dī Fō Shī Sono 6–9)
    20 (100) Love Train – The World Is One
    Rabu Torein – Sekai wa Hitotsu (ラブトレイン-世界はひとつ)
    March 9, 2010[28] ISBN 978-4-08-870060-1
    • 77. "D4C (10)" (D4C(ディ・フォー・シー) その⑩, Dī Fō Shī Sono 10)
  • 78–80. "D4C (11–13): Love Train" (D4C(ディ・フォー・シー) その⑪〜⑬ -ラブトレイン-, Dī Fō Shī Sono 11–13 -Rabu Torein-)
  • 21 (101) Ball Breaker
    Bōru Bureikā (ボール・ブレイカー)
    July 2, 2010[29] ISBN 978-4-08-870099-1
    • 81–82. "D4C (14–15): Love Train" (D4C(ディ・フォー・シー) その⑭〜⑮ -ラブトレイン-, Dī Fō Shī Sono 14–15 -Rabu Torein-)
  • 83–84. "Ball Breaker (1–2)" (ボール・ブレイカー その①〜②, Bōru Bureikā Sono 1–2)
  • 22 (102) Break My Heart, Break Your Heart
    Bureiku Mai Hāto Bureiku Yua Hāto (ブレイク・マイ・ハート ブレイク・ユア・ハート)
    November 4, 2010[30] ISBN 978-4-08-870160-8
    • 85–87. "Ball Breaker (3–5)" (ボール・ブレイカー その③〜⑤, Bōru Bureikā Sono 3–5)
  • 88. "Break My Heart, Break Your Heart (1)" (ブレイク・マイ・ハート ブレイク・ユア・ハート その①, Bureiku Mai Hāto Bureiku Yua Hāto Sono 1)
  • 23 (103) High Voltage
    Hai Vorutēji (ハイ・ヴォルテージ)
    May 19, 2011[31] ISBN 978-4-08-870206-3
    • 89. "Break My Heart, Break Your Heart (2)" (ブレイク・マイ・ハート ブレイク・ユア・ハート その②, Bureiku Mai Hāto Bureiku Yua Hāto Sono 2)
  • 90–91. "High Voltage (1–2)" (ハイ・ヴォルテージ その①〜②, Hai Vorutēji Sono 1–2)
  • 24 (104) The Stars and Stripes Forever
    Seijōki yo Eien Nare (星条旗よ 永遠なれ)
    June 3, 2011[32] ISBN 978-4-08-870253-7
    • 92–93. "High Voltage (3–4)" (ハイ・ヴォルテージ その③〜④, Hai Vorutēji Sono 3–4)
    • 94. "The World of the Stars and Stripes" (星条旗の世界, Seijōki no Sekai)
  • 95. "The World of the Stars and Stripes: Outro" (星条旗の世界-OUTRO, Seijōki no Sekai–Autoro)
  • 2017 release

    No. Japanese release date Japanese ISBN
    1 February 17, 2017[33] ISBN 978-4-08-619657-4
    2 February 17, 2017[34] ISBN 978-4-08-619658-1
    3 March 17, 2017[35] ISBN 978-4-08-619659-8
    4 March 17, 2017[36] ISBN 978-4-08-619660-4
    5 April 18, 2017[37] ISBN 978-4-08-619661-1
    6 April 18, 2017[38] ISBN 978-4-08-619662-8
    7 May 18, 2017[39] ISBN 978-4-08-619663-5
    8 June 16, 2017[40] ISBN 978-4-08-619664-2
    9 July 18, 2017[41] ISBN 978-4-08-619665-9
    10 August 18, 2017[42] ISBN 978-4-08-619666-6
    11 September 15, 2017[43] ISBN 978-4-08-619667-3
    12 October 18, 2017[44] ISBN 978-4-08-619668-0
    13 November 17, 2017[45] ISBN 978-4-08-619669-7
    14 December 15, 2017[46] ISBN 978-4-08-619670-3
    15 January 18, 2018[47] ISBN 978-4-08-619671-0
    16 January 18, 2018[48] ISBN 978-4-08-619672-7

    Notes

    1. ^ Johnny Joestar (ジョニィ・ジョースター, Jonī Jōsutā)
    2. ^ Tusk (牙(タスク), Tasuku)
    3. ^ Gyro Zeppeli (ジャイロ・ツェペリ, Jairo Tseperi)
    4. ^ Lucy Steel (ルーシー・スティール, Rūshī Sutīru)
    5. ^ Funny Valentine (ファニー・ヴァレンタイン, Fanī Varentain)
    6. ^ Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap (Dirty deeds done dirt cheap(いともたやすく行われるえげつない行為), Dātī Dīzu Dan Dāto Chīpu (Itomo Tayasuku Okonawareru Egetsunai Kōi))
    7. ^ Diego Brando (ディエゴ・ブランドー, Diego Burandō)
    8. ^ Scary Monsters (スケアリー・モンスターズ, Sukearī Monsutāzu)
    9. ^ THE WORLD (ザ・ワールド) (Za Wārudo)
    10. ^ Hot Pants (ホット・パンツ, Hotto Pantsu)
    11. ^ Cream Starter (クリーム・スターター, Kurīmu Sutātā)
    12. ^ Wekapipo (ウェカピポ)
    13. ^ Stephen Steel (スティーブン・スティール, Sutībun Sutīru)
    14. ^ a b Steel Ball Run: How the Race Got Started and chapter 63 were only released in the volumization of Steel Ball Run.

    References

    1. ^ a b "Steel Ball Run Volume 01". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 9, 2012. Retrieved June 7, 2009.
    2. ^ a b c "『STEEL BALL RUN』 第1巻 荒木飛呂彦 【日刊マンガガイド】". Kono Manga ga Sugoi! (in Japanese). Takarajimasha. March 18, 2017. Archived from the original on August 19, 2017. Retrieved August 19, 2017.
    3. ^ a b c d e Mitchem, Casey Lee; Silverman, Rebecca (2017-06-29). "Interview: Jojo's Bizarre Adventure Creator Hirohiko Araki". Anime News Network. Archived from the original on 2017-07-08. Retrieved 2017-09-30.
    4. ^ Araki, Hirohiko (2006). Steel Ball Run Vol. 7: Hiroi Hiroi Daisōgen no Chiisana Bohyō (in Japanese). Shueisha. Dust jacket. ISBN 978-4-08-874117-8.
    5. ^ Araki, Hirohiko (2017). Manga in Theory and Practice: The Craft of Creating Manga. Translated by Collins, Nathan A. Viz Media. p. 161. ISBN 978-1-4215-9407-1.
    6. ^ Araki, Hirohiko (2017). Manga in Theory and Practice: The Craft of Creating Manga. Translated by Collins, Nathan A. Viz Media. p. 56. ISBN 978-1-4215-9407-1.
    7. ^ Clamp (2006). xxxHolic Official Guidebook (in Japanese). Kodansha. p. 162. ISBN 978-4-0637-2226-0.
    8. ^ a b Erkael (October 8, 2016). "Critique de la série Jojo's bizarre adventure - Saison 7 - Steel Ball Run". Manga-News (in French). Archived from the original on August 19, 2017. Retrieved August 19, 2017.
    9. ^ Jensen, K. Thor (July 20, 2017). "The 11 Best Bromances In Comics". Geek.com. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on August 18, 2017. Retrieved August 19, 2017.
    10. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 02". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 9, 2012. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
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    12. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 04". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 9, 2012. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
    13. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 05". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 9, 2012. Retrieved June 7, 2009.
    14. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 06". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 9, 2012. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
    15. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 07". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 9, 2012. Retrieved June 7, 2009.
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    17. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 09". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 11, 2012. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
    18. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 10". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 11, 2012. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
    19. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 11". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 11, 2012. Retrieved June 7, 2009.
    20. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 12". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 11, 2012. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
    21. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 13". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 11, 2012. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
    22. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 14". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 11, 2012. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
    23. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 15". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 11, 2012. Retrieved June 7, 2009.
    24. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 16". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 11, 2012. Retrieved June 7, 2009.
    25. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 17". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 11, 2012. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
    26. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 18". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 30, 2012. Retrieved November 18, 2009.
    27. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 19". Shueisha. Archived from the original on September 30, 2012. Retrieved November 18, 2009.
    28. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 20". Shueisha. Archived from the original on October 4, 2012. Retrieved June 5, 2010.
    29. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 21". Shueisha. Archived from the original on July 22, 2011. Retrieved June 5, 2010.
    30. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 22". Shueisha. Archived from the original on October 9, 2012. Retrieved June 6, 2011.
    31. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 23". Shueisha. Archived from the original on October 9, 2012. Retrieved June 6, 2011.
    32. ^ "Steel Ball Run Volume 24". Shueisha. Archived from the original on October 9, 2012. Retrieved June 6, 2011.
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    35. ^ "STEEL BALL RUN  3" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on 2017-05-16. Retrieved 2018-02-09.
    36. ^ "STEEL BALL RUN  4" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on 2017-05-16. Retrieved 2018-02-09.
    37. ^ "STEEL BALL RUN  5" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on 2017-05-16. Retrieved 2018-02-09.
    38. ^ "STEEL BALL RUN  6" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on 2017-05-16. Retrieved 2018-02-09.
    39. ^ "STEEL BALL RUN  7" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on 2018-02-09. Retrieved 2018-02-09.
    40. ^ "STEEL BALL RUN  8" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on 2018-02-09. Retrieved 2018-02-09.
    41. ^ "STEEL BALL RUN  9" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on 2018-02-09. Retrieved 2018-02-09.
    42. ^ "STEEL BALL RUN  10" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on 2018-02-09. Retrieved 2018-02-09.
    43. ^ "STEEL BALL RUN  11" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on 2018-02-09. Retrieved 2018-02-09.
    44. ^ "STEEL BALL RUN  12" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on 2018-02-09. Retrieved 2018-02-09.
    45. ^ "STEEL BALL RUN  13" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on 2018-02-09. Retrieved 2018-02-09.
    46. ^ "STEEL BALL RUN  14" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on 2018-02-09. Retrieved 2018-02-09.
    47. ^ "STEEL BALL RUN  15" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on 2018-02-09. Retrieved 2018-02-09.
    48. ^ "STEEL BALL RUN  16" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on 2018-02-09. Retrieved 2018-02-09.

    External links

    • Official website
    • Official Vomic page
    • Steel Ball Run (manga) at Anime News Network's encyclopedia
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