Southwest Passage

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Southwest Passage
Directed by Ray Nazarro
Produced by Edward Small
Written by Harry Essex
Starring Rod Cameron
Joanne Dru
John Ireland
Music by Arthur Lange
Emil Newman
Cinematography Sam Leavitt
Edited by Grant Whytock
Production
company
Distributed by United Artists
Release date
April 1, 1954 (1954-04-01)
Running time
75 min.
Country United States
Language English

Southwest Passage is a 1954 American Pathécolor western film directed by Ray Nazarro and starring Joanne Dru, Rod Cameron and John Ireland, who are determined to make a unique trek across the west, using camels as his beasts of burden. The picture was originally released in 3-D.

Plot summary

With $20,000 in stolen gold, Clint McDonald, his girl Lilly and wounded brother Jeb head for the hills, just ahead of a posse. Lilly goes to town to find a doctor for Jeb, then returns with the best she can find, Dr. Stanton, a drunken veterinarian.

Clint becomes aware of a camel-led caravan being led by Edward Fitzpatrick Beale and decides to join it, taking Dr. Stanton's medical kit and pretending to be him. Lilly rides up later, claiming to be separated from a wagon train, but Jeb dies from his injuries.

Mule skinner Matt Caroll is at odds with Clint from the beginning, becoming attracted to Lilly and suspicious of Clint's skill as a doctor. After scout Tall Tale is bitten by a gila monster and needs a limb amputated, Clint's true identity is revealed and Beale makes him leave. Carroll follows, after the gold, but Clint kills him. Clint repents to Beale by leading the caravan to water and helping fend off attacking Apache braves. He reunites with Lilly and vows to return the gold.

Cast

Production

Parts of the film were shot in Johnson Canyon and Coral Pink Sand Dunes in Utah.[1]

Notes

  • Navajo Indians from Utah played Apaches in the film. John Ireland and Joanne Dru were husband and wife when this film was made.[2]
  • This is one of only two films for which the original 3-D elements are lost, the other being Top Banana (1954).
  • The film was originally known as Camel Corps.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ D'Arc, James V. (2010). When Hollywood came to town: a history of moviemaking in Utah (1st ed.). Layton, Utah: Gibbs Smith. ISBN 9781423605874. 
  2. ^ http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title.jsp?stid=20986&category=Notes
  3. ^ MOVIELAND BRIEFS Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 29 June 1953: B6

External links


Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Southwest_Passage&oldid=806122453"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southwest_Passage
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Southwest Passage"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA