South Korea women's national football team

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Korea Republic
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Taegeuk Nangja (Taegeuk Ladies)
Association Korea Football Association
Confederation AFC (Asia)
Sub-confederation EAFF (East Asia)
Head coach Yoon Deok-yeo
Captain Cho So-hyun
Most caps Kim Jung-mi (110)
Top scorer Ji So-yun (45)
FIFA code KOR
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 15 Increase 1 (22 June 2018)
Highest 14 (December 2017)
Lowest 26 (August 2004)
First international
 Japan 13–1 South Korea 
(Seoul, South Korea; September 6, 1990)
Biggest win
 South Korea 19–0 Northern Mariana Islands 
(Tainan County, Taiwan; August 26, 2009)
Biggest defeat
 Japan 13–1 South Korea 
(Seoul, South Korea; September 6, 1990)
World Cup
Appearances 3 (first in 2003)
Best result Round of 16 (2015)
Asian Cup
Appearances 11 (first in 1991)
Best result 3rd (2003)

The South Korea women's national football team (Korean: 대한민국 여자 축구 국가대표팀; Daehanminguk Yeoja Chukgu Gukgadaepyo-Team, literally "Republic of Korea women's football national team") represents South Korea in international women's football competitions. The team is referred to as the "Korea Republic" by FIFA. Its first game was a match against Japan in 1990, which it lost 13–1. Since then, it has qualified for two FIFA World Cups, in 2003 and 2015.

History

1949–2002: Beginnings

Less than a year after the government of the Republic of Korea was established in 1948, the first official women's football matches were held in Seoul on 28 and 29 June 1949, as a part of the National Girls' and Women's Sport Games. While women's basketball and volleyball won public recognition through the Games, football was seen as being unsuitable for women and as being unattractive to the public; as a result, the girls' teams were disbanded soon after the event.[1]

When women's football was officially adopted at the 1990 Asian Games in Beijing, the Korean sports authorities decided to form a women's team with athletes from other sports and send the team to the Games.[1] The result was defeat in all matches against Japan, North Korea, China and Chinese Taipei.[2] Nevertheless, colleges and corporations started to launch women's football teams through the 1990s and the first annual national women's football event, the Queen's Cup, was held in 1993. With these changes, South Korea was able to finish in fourth place at the 1995 AFC Women's Championship in Malaysia.[3]

When the 1999 Women's World Cup sparked interest worldwide, the Korean ministry in charge of sports sponsored the foundation of new teams and tournaments for girls’ high school teams, university teams and company teams. To promote women’s football, the Korea Women's Football Federation (KWFF) was established in March 2001, as an independent organization in association with the Korea Football Association (KFA).[1]

2003–2013: First World Cup and a period of decline

South Korea finished in third place at the 2003 AFC Women's Championship and qualified for the World Cup for the first time. The Taegeuk Ladies were drawn in Group B with Norway, France and Brazil. Their first match played at the World Cup was a 3–0 loss to Brazil on 21 September 2003. They went on to lose 1–0 to France and 7–1 to Norway. Kim Jin-hee scored the first ever South Korean World Cup goal on 27 September 2003 against Norway.

Despite winning the inaugural EAFF E-1 Football Championship on home soil in 2005, South Korea failed to qualify for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup. The Taegeuk Ladies won bronze at the 2010 Asian Games and at the 2010 EAFF Women's Football Championship, but once again failed to qualify for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

2014–present: Second World Cup

South Korea finished in fourth place at the 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup and qualified for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, where they made it out of the group stage for the first time. They were drawn in Group E with Brazil, Spain and Costa Rica. South Korea lost 2–0 to Brazil on 9 June 2015, but a 2–2 draw with Costa Rica on 13 June and a 2–1 victory against Spain on 17 June were enough to progress. They went on to lose 3–0 to France in the round of 16 on 21 June 2015.

Competition records

World Cup

World Cup Finals
Year Result Position GP W D L GF GA D
China 1991 Did not qualify
Sweden 1995 Did not qualify
United States 1999 Did not qualify
United States 2003 Group stage 14 3 0 0 3 1 11 −10
China 2007 Did not qualify
Germany 2011 Did not qualify
Canada 2015 Round of 16 14 4 1 1 2 4 8 −4
France 2019 Qualified
Total 3/8 7 1 1 5 5 19 −14
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Asian Cup

  • Hong Kong 1975Did not participate
  • Taiwan 1977Did not participate
  • India 1979Did not participate
  • Hong Kong 1981Did not participate
  • Thailand 1983Did not participate
  • Hong Kong 1986Did not participate
  • Hong Kong 1989Did not participate
  • Japan 1991 — Round 1
  • Malaysia 1993 — Round 1
  • Malaysia 1995 — 4th place
  • China 1997 — Round 1
  • Philippines 1999 — Round 1
  • Chinese Taipei 2001 — 4th place
  • Thailand 2003 — 3rd place
  • Australia 2006 — Round 1
  • Vietnam 2008 — Round 1
  • China 2010 — Round 1
  • Vietnam 2014 — 4th place
  • Jordan 2018 — 5th place

Olympics

  • United States 1996Did not qualify
  • Australia 2000Did not qualify
  • Greece 2004Did not qualify
  • China 2008Did not qualify
  • United Kingdom 2012Did not qualify
  • Brazil 2016Did not qualify

Asian Games

Asian Games record
Hosts / Year Result GP W D L GS GA GD
China 1990 5th place 5 1 0 4 2 −30 −28
Japan 1994 Fourth place 3 0 0 3 0 −9 −9
Thailand 1998 Group stage 3 1 1 1 8 −4 +4
South Korea 2002 Fourth place 5 2 0 3 6 −8 −2
Qatar 2006 Fourth place 5 2 0 3 7 −10 −3
China 2010 Third place 5 3 1 1 14 −4 +10
South Korea 2014 Third place 6 5 0 1 33 −2 +31
Total 7/7 32 14 2 16 70 −68 +2

EAFF Women's Football Championship

EAFF Women's Football Championship record
Hosts / Year Result Pld W D* L GF GA GD
South Korea 2005 Champions 3 2 1 0 3 0 +3
China 2008 Fourth place 6 3 0 3 15 9 +6
Japan 2010 Third place 7 5 0 2 47 4 +43
South Korea 2013 Third place 3 1 0 2 4 5 –1
China 2015 Runners-up 6 5 0 1 29 3 +26
Japan 2017 Fourth place 6 3 0 3 43 7 +36
Total 6/6 31 18 1 11 141 28 +113
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Peace Queen Cup

Hosts / Year Result GP W D L GF GA GD
South Korea 2006 Group Stage 3 0 0 3 2 6 –4
South Korea 2008 Fourth place 3 2 0 1 5 4 +1
South Korea 2010 Champions 3 1 2 0 2 1 +1
Total 3/3 9 3 2 4 +9 −11 –2

Kits

Kit used in 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup match vs Brazil.

The women's team usually use exactly the same kit as its men counterpart, along with the combinations available. However, there were many combinations that the men's team never used.

Coaching staff

Position Name
Manager South Korea Yoon Deok-Yeo
Assistant Manager South Korea Jeong Seong-cheon
Coach South Korea Kim Eun-jung
Goalkeeping Coach South Korea Jeong Yuseok

Players

Current squad

Squad for the 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup.[4]

Caps and goals correct as of: 2 June 2018.

Head coach: Yoon Deok-yeo

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Yoon Young-geul (1987-10-28) 28 October 1987 (age 30) 9 0 South Korea Gyeongju KHNP
2 2DF Park Cho-rong (1988-02-20) 20 February 1988 (age 30) 4 0 South Korea Hwacheon KSPO
3 2DF Kim Hye-yeong (1995-02-26) 26 February 1995 (age 23) 9 1 South Korea Gyeongju KHNP
4 2DF Kim Do-yeon (1988-12-07) 7 December 1988 (age 29) 80 1 South Korea Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
5 2DF Hong Hye-ji (1996-08-25) 25 August 1996 (age 21) 11 1 South Korea Changnyeong
6 2DF Lim Seon-joo (1990-11-27) 27 November 1990 (age 27) 69 4 South Korea Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
7 3MF Lee Mina (1991-11-08) 8 November 1991 (age 26) 45 11 Japan INAC Kobe Leonessa
8 3MF Cho So-hyun (1988-06-24) 24 June 1988 (age 30) 112 20 Norway Avaldsnes IL
9 4FW Jeon Ga-eul (1988-09-14) 14 September 1988 (age 29) 91 35 South Korea Hwacheon KSPO
10 4FW Ji So-yun (1991-02-21) 21 February 1991 (age 27) 103 45 England Chelsea
11 4FW Jung Seol-bin (1990-01-06) 6 January 1990 (age 28) 72 20 South Korea Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
12 2DF Jang Sel-gi (1994-05-31) 31 May 1994 (age 24) 42 9 South Korea Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
13 3MF Lee Young-ju (1992-04-22) 22 April 1992 (age 26) 24 2 South Korea Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
14 4FW Choe Yu-ri (1994-09-16) 16 September 1994 (age 23) 23 4 South Korea Gumi Sportstoto
15 3MF Lee So-dam (1994-10-12) 12 October 1994 (age 23) 45 4 South Korea Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
16 4FW Han Chae-rin (1996-09-02) 2 September 1996 (age 21) 11 3 South Korea Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
17 4FW Lee Geum-min (1994-04-07) 7 April 1994 (age 24) 37 12 South Korea Gyeongju KHNP
18 1GK Kang Ga-ae (1990-12-10) 10 December 1990 (age 27) 9 0 South Korea Gumi Sportstoto
19 4FW Son Hwa-yeon (1997-03-15) 15 March 1997 (age 21) 8 2 South Korea Changnyeong
20 2DF Kim Hye-ri (1990-06-25) 25 June 1990 (age 28) 73 1 South Korea Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
21 1GK Jung Bo-ram (1996-09-12) 12 September 1996 (age 21) 2 0 South Korea Hwacheon KSPO
22 3MF Jang Chang (1996-06-21) 21 June 1996 (age 22) 7 0 South Korea Korea University
23 3MF Choi Ye-seul (1998-12-24) 24 December 1998 (age 19) 1 0 Japan INAC Kobe Leonessa

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Fan Hong; J.A. Mangan (23 November 2004). Soccer, Women, Sexual Liberation: Kicking off a New Era. Routledge. pp. 71–81. ISBN 978-1-135-77058-7. 
  2. ^ "Asian Games 1990 (Women's Tournament)". RSSSF. Retrieved 10 July 2018. 
  3. ^ Manzenreiter, Wolfram; Horne, John (14 August 2008). "Playing the Post‐Fordist Game in/to the Far East: The Footballisation of China, Japan and South Korea". Soccer & Society. Informa UK Limited. 8 (4): 561–577. doi:10.1080/14660970701440899. ISSN 1466-0970. 
  4. ^ "2018년 03월 09일 현재, 여자 국가대표팀 명단 (2018 AFC 여자 아시안컵)" (in Korean). Korea Football Association. Retrieved 8 April 2018. 

External links

  • Official website
  • FIFA profile
Preceded by
Inaugural Champion
EAFF Women's Football Championship
2005 (First title)
Succeeded by
2008 Japan 
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=South_Korea_women%27s_national_football_team&oldid=850267511"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Korea_women's_national_football_team
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "South Korea women's national football team"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA