Sir William Dunn, 1st Baronet, of Clitheroe

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Sir William Henry Dunn, 1st Baronet (8 October 1856 – 12 June 1926) was a British Conservative Party politician.

Dunn was born in Clitheroe, in Lancashire. He was married to Ellen Pawle in 1885 and they had one son and a daughter.

By profession he was an auctioneer and surveyor, a Fellow of the Surveyors' Institution. He was a well-known figure in the business and civic life of the City of London. He was an Alderman of the City of London and Sheriff in 1906-1907. He was Lord Mayor of London in 1916-1917.[1] He was also a Liveryman of several of the City Guilds and an officer in the Territorial Force.[2]

He was elected as Member of Parliament (MP) for Southwark West in the general election of January 1910, taking the seat from the sitting Liberal MP Richard Causton. However he lost the seat back to the Liberals in December 1910, losing to Edward Anthony Strauss.

He was knighted in 1907 [1] and created a baronet in 1917.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b Who was Who, OUP 2007
  2. ^ The Times, House of Commons 1910; Politico's Publishing 2004 p28
  3. ^ Leigh Rayment's Peerage page: http://www.leighrayment.com/commons/Scommons4.htm

External links

  • Hansard 1803–2005: contributions in Parliament by Sir William Dunn
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Richard Causton
Member of Parliament for Southwark West
January 1910December 1910
Succeeded by
Edward Anthony Strauss


Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Sir_William_Dunn,_1st_Baronet,_of_Clitheroe&oldid=786536692"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_William_Dunn,_1st_Baronet,_of_Clitheroe
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Sir William Dunn, 1st Baronet, of Clitheroe"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA