Setae (Lydia)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Setae or Setai (Ancient Greek: Σέται), or Settae or Settai (Σέτται), or Saettae or Saittai or Saittae (Σαίτται) was a town of ancient Lydia,[1] located at Sidas Kaleh[2][3] in Modern Turkey.[4][5] The ruins of that town consist of a stadium,[6] tombs and ruins of several temples.[7][8] The town is not mentioned by any of the earlier writers, but appears in Ptolemy[9] and Hierocles.[10]

Location

The city lying between the upper reaches of the River Hermus and its tributary the Hyllus,[11] and was part of the Katakekaumene.

Its site is located at Sidas Kale, near İcikler in Asiatic Turkey.[12][13]

History

The city struck coins and was visited by the Emperor Hadrian.[14]

Bishopric

Saittae was also the seat of a Byzantine Bishopric. Bishop Limenius signed the Chalcedon Creed[15] while Bishop Amachius[16][17] spoke at the Council of Chalcedon. Although an Islamic area now, under the name Saittae it remains a titular see of the Roman Catholic Church.[18]

References

  1. ^ Michael Greenhalgh, From the Romans to the Railways: The Fate of Antiquities in Asia Minor (BRILL, 25 Sep. 2013) p5.
  2. ^ The Journal of the Royal Geographical Society, Volume 8 (Royal Geographical Society (Great Britain), 1838) p 142.
  3. ^ William John Hamilton, Researches in Asia Minor, Pontus, and Armenia,: With Some Account of Their Antiquities and Geology [in 1836], Volume 2 (John Murray, 1842) p 145.
  4. ^ Michael Greenhalgh, From the Romans to the Railways: The Fate of Antiquities in Asia Minor(BRILL, 25 Sep. 2013) p 30.
  5. ^ Saittai, Manisa (Provinz).
  6. ^ Michael Greenhalgh, From the Romans to the Railways: The Fate of Antiquities in Asia Minor (BRILL, 25 Sep. 2013) p30.
  7. ^ Saittae at Perseus.tufts.edu.
  8. ^ William John Hamilton, Researches in Asia Minor, Pontus and Armenia, Volume 1 (Georg Olms Verlag, 1984) p144.
  9. ^ Ptolemy. The Geography. 5.2.21.
  10. ^ Hierocles. Synecdemus. p. 669.
  11. ^ The Literary Gazette: A Weekly Journal of Literature, Science, and the Fine Arts (H. Colburn, 1842) p824.
  12. ^ Richard Talbert, ed. (2000). Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World. Princeton University Press. p. 62, and directory notes accompanying.
  13. ^ Lund University. Digital Atlas of the Roman Empire.
  14. ^ Anthony R Birley, Anthony R. BirleyHadrian: The Restless Emperor (Routledge, 15 Apr. 2013) p168.
  15. ^ Richard Price, Michael Gaddis, The Acts of the Council of Chalcedon, Volume 1 (Liverpool University press, 2005) p336.
  16. ^ Richard Price, Michael Gaddis, The Acts of the Council of Chalcedon, Volume 1 (Liverpool University Press, 2005) p 85.
  17. ^ http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/diocese/d2s10.html
  18. ^ http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/diocese/d2s10.html

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainSmith, William, ed. (1854–1857). "Setae". Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography. London: John Murray.

Coordinates: 38°47′25″N 28°37′08″E / 38.79014°N 28.61884°E / 38.79014; 28.61884

Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Setae_(Lydia)&oldid=906861921"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Setae_(Lydia)
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Setae (Lydia)"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA