Serie A Coach of the Year

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Serie A Coach of the Year
Awarded for The outstanding manager in each given Serie A season
Country Italy
First awarded 1997
Highlights
Most awards Marcello Lippi, Antonio Conte, Massimiliano Allegri (3)
Most consecutive wins 3 (Antonio Conte)

The Serie A Coach of the Year (Italian: Migliore allenatore) is a yearly award organized by the Italian Footballers' Association (AIC) given to the coach who has been considered to have performed the best over the previous Serie A season. The award is part of the Gran Galà del Calcio (formerly known as the "Oscar del Calcio AIC") awards event.[1] Juventus coaches have won the most awards with ten. Only two non-Italians have won the award; Sven-Göran Eriksson became the first in 2000 while José Mourinho was the first foreign coach to win the award twice.

History

The inaugural award, given at the "Oscar del Calcio AIC" ceremony, was presented after the conclusion of the 1996–97 Serie A season to Marcello Lippi who had led Juventus to the title, winning Serie A by two points ahead of Parma.[2] Juventus also won the 1996 UEFA Champions League Final that year, against Ajax.[3] Lippi retained the Coach of the Year award the following season, when Juventus secured the domestic title again,[4] yet lost the Champions League Final to "perennial German underdogs" Borussia Dortmund.[5] Milan, led by Alberto Zaccheroni, won the league in the 1998–99 season, and he became the second individual recipient of the Coach of the Year award.[6] Sweden's Sven-Göran Eriksson managed Lazio to their first league title since 1974 when they topped the league in the 1999–2000 season. Further success in both the UEFA Super Cup and the Coppa Italia ensured that Eriksson was named the first non-Italian Serie A Coach of the Year.[7]

Massimiliano Allegri
Massimiliano Allegri is the current holder of the Coach of the Year award, having also won it in 2011 and 2015.

Carlo Ancelotti won the award with Juventus in the 2000–01 season, becoming the first coach to do so despite having not won the league, finishing runners-up behind Roma by two points.[8] The following season, a fifth place finish from newly promoted Chievo, and subsequent qualification for the 2002–03 UEFA Cup, ensured the Coach of the Year was awarded to Luigi Delneri.[9][10] Lippi became the first coach to win the award on three occasions following the 2002–03 season – he led Juventus to win Serie A, the Supercoppa and to a narrow defeat (on penalties) in the first all-Italian Champions League Final.[11][12] The 2003–04 season saw Milan claim their first Serie A title in five years, finishing eleven points ahead of nearest rivals Roma.[13] Milan's coach, Ancelotti, was presented with his second Coach of the Year award in four seasons.[10] Fabio Capello won the award following the 2004–05 season in which he led Juventus to league success.[14] He later resigned in the wake of the Calciopoli match-fixing scandal and Juventus were stripped of their title and relegated to Serie B.[15]

Luciano Spalletti, the Roma coach, won the award for the next two seasons. Roma finished fifth in the 2005–06 season but were later elevated to second following the disqualification of clubs after the Calciopoli scandal. Roma also made it to the final of the Coppa Italia but were defeated 4–1 on aggregate by Internazionale.[16] In the 2006–07 season, Spalletti led Roma to runners-up in Serie A and to win the Coppa Italia.[17] A fourth place league finish for ACF Fiorentina and an appearance in the semi-finals of the 2007–08 UEFA Cup saw Cesare Prandelli as recipient of the Coach of the Year award in 2008.[18][10] Portuguese coach José Mourinho became the second non-Italian to win the award when he led Internazionale to the Serie A title in the 2008–09 season, along with victory in the 2008 Supercoppa Italiana.[19] He retained the award after the following season in which Internazionale not only retained their domestic title but won the Coppa Italia and the Champions League.[20]

Milan appointed Massimiliano Allegri as their new coach for the 2010–11 season.[21] Having led the club to league success and the semi-finals of the Coppa Italia, he was awarded the Coach of the Year title, presented at the "Gran Galà del Calcio" which replaced the previous ceremony.[22] The following season, another newly appointed manager won the award. Former player Antonio Conte succeeded Delneri as Juventus manager and led the club to their first league title in nine years, along with a losing appearance in the final of the Coppa Italia.[23] Conte won the Coach of the Year award the following two seasons – Juventus defended their league title in the 2012–13 season along with winning the Supercoppa,[24] and repeated that feat in the 2013–14 season.[25] Leaving to manage the Italian national team, Conte was replaced by Allegri who secured the league title, the Coppa Italia, and runners-up spots in both the Supercoppa and the Champions League.[26][27] Allegri led Juventus to their fifth consecutive Serie A title in the 2015–16 season, also winning both the Supercoppa and the Coppa Italia, and retained the Coach of the Year trophy.[28]

List of winners

Marcello Lippi
Marcello Lippi won the inaugural award in 1997 and went on to win two further awards in 1998 and 2003, all with Juventus.
Antonio Conte
Antonio Conte is one of three managers to win the award three times.
Key
§ Denotes the club were Serie A champions in the same season
Season Coach Nationality Club Ref(s)
1997 Lippi, MarcelloMarcello Lippi  Italy Juventus§ [10]
1998 Lippi, MarcelloMarcello Lippi  Italy Juventus§ [29]
1999 Zaccheroni, AlbertoAlberto Zaccheroni  Italy Milan§ [10]
2000 Eriksson, Sven-GöranSven-Göran Eriksson  Sweden Lazio§ [10]
2001 Ancelotti, CarloCarlo Ancelotti  Italy Juventus [30]
2002 Delneri, LuigiLuigi Delneri  Italy Chievo [10]
2003 Lippi, MarcelloMarcello Lippi  Italy Juventus§ [10]
2004 Ancelotti, CarloCarlo Ancelotti  Italy Milan§ [30]
2005 Capello, FabioFabio Capello  Italy Juventus [10]
2006 Spalletti, LucianoLuciano Spalletti  Italy Roma [10]
2007 Spalletti, LucianoLuciano Spalletti  Italy Roma [31]
2008 Prandelli, CesareCesare Prandelli  Italy Fiorentina [32]
2009 Mourinho, JoséJosé Mourinho  Portugal Internazionale§ [33]
2010 Mourinho, JoséJosé Mourinho  Portugal Internazionale§ [34]
2011 Allegri, MassimilianoMassimiliano Allegri  Italy Milan§ [35]
2012 Conte, AntonioAntonio Conte  Italy Juventus§ [36]
2013 Conte, AntonioAntonio Conte  Italy Juventus§ [36]
2014 Conte, AntonioAntonio Conte  Italy Juventus§ [36]
2015 Allegri, MassimilianoMassimiliano Allegri  Italy Juventus§ [37]
2016 Allegri, MassimilianoMassimiliano Allegri  Italy Juventus§ [38]

By nationality

Sven-Goran Eriksson
Sven-Göran Eriksson is one of only two non-Italian winners of the Serie A Coach of the Year title.

As of 2017, Sven-Göran Eriksson (Sweden) and José Mourinho (Portugal) are the only non-Italian coaches to win the title.

Country Coaches Total
 Italy 9 17
 Portugal 1 2
 Sweden 1 1

By club

Coaches of Juventus have won the most awards, including the last five.

Club Coaches Total
Juventus 5 10
Milan 3 3
Internazionale 1 2
Roma 1 2
Chievo 1 1
Fiorentina 1 1
Lazio 1 1

See also

References

  1. ^ "Gran Galà del Calcio a Milano: gli juventini i più premiati". La Repubblica (in Italian). 31 January 2017. Retrieved 20 September 2017. 
  2. ^ "Italy Championship 1996/97". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 13 May 2014. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  3. ^ Pitt-Brooke, Jack (1 June 2017). "Juventus' controversial European past casts dark shadows ahead of Champions League final against Real Madrid". The Independent. Archived from the original on 2 July 2017. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  4. ^ "Italy Championship 1997/98". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 22 September 2008. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  5. ^ Rzouki, Mina (23 February 2015). "Echoes of the 1997 Champions League final as Juve prepare for Dortmund". ESPN. Archived from the original on 20 September 2017. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  6. ^ "Italy Championship 1998/99". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 28 March 2009. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  7. ^ Newman, Blair (30 March 2015). "How Sven-Goran Eriksson's Lazio won the great Serie A title race of 1999–2000". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2 June 2017. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  8. ^ "Italy Championship 2000/01". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 26 January 2015. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  9. ^ "Italy Championship 2001/02". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 13 January 2014. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Albo d'Oro" (in Italian). assocalciatori.it. Archived from the original on 15 May 2013. Retrieved 25 April 2016. 
  11. ^ "Italy Championship 2002/03". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 31 January 2016. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  12. ^ "All-Italian finals". UEFA. 16 May 2003. Archived from the original on 20 September 2017. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  13. ^ "Italy 2003/04". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 7 February 2016. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  14. ^ "Italy 2004/05". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 21 August 2017. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  15. ^ Eccleshare, Charlie (3 May 2017). "How Juventus went to hell and back and became European heavyweights again". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 3 May 2017. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  16. ^ "Italy 2005/06". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 27 October 2009. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  17. ^ "Italy 2006/07". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 6 July 2009. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  18. ^ "Italy 2007/08". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 15 March 2013. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  19. ^ "Italy 2008/09". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 15 March 2013. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  20. ^ "Italy 2009/10". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 14 March 2013. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  21. ^ "The coach is Allegri!". acmilan.com. Associazione Calcio Milan. 25 June 2010. Archived from the original on 9 May 2012. Retrieved 27 May 2011. 
  22. ^ "Italy 2010/11". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 18 November 2016. Retrieved 20 September 2017. 
  23. ^ "Italy 2011/12". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 18 November 2016. Retrieved 20 September 2017. 
  24. ^ "Italy 2012/13". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 27 July 2014. Retrieved 20 September 2017. 
  25. ^ "Italy 2013/14". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 18 November 2016. Retrieved 20 September 2017. 
  26. ^ "Massimiliano Allegri succeeds Antonio Conte as Juventus coach". CNN. 16 July 2014. Archived from the original on 9 October 2016. Retrieved 20 September 2017. 
  27. ^ "Italy 2014/15". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 15 February 2017. Retrieved 20 September 2017. 
  28. ^ "Italy 2015/16". RSSSF.com. 31 January 2000. Archived from the original on 28 December 2016. Retrieved 20 September 2017. 
  29. ^ "PALMARES" (in Italian). Marcello Lippi.org. Archived from the original on 14 January 2016. Retrieved 21 December 2015. 
  30. ^ a b "Carlo Ancelotti". League Managers Association. Archived from the original on 22 March 2017. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  31. ^ "Ibra re del calcio italiano Lo segue a ruota Del Piero" (in Italian). La Gazzetta dello Sport. 19 January 2009. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 21 December 2015. 
  32. ^ "Ibra re del calcio italiano Lo segue a ruota Del Piero" (in Italian). La Gazzetta dello Sport. 19 January 2009. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 21 December 2015. 
  33. ^ "Inter triumph at AIC 2010 'Football Oscars'". F.C. Internazionale Milano – Official Website. 25 January 2011. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 5 March 2015. 
  34. ^ "Oscar del Calcio, i vincitori". Sportlive.it. 19 January 2010. Archived from the original on 19 January 2016. Retrieved 7 February 2016. 
  35. ^ "Serie A: Juventus appoint Massimiliano Allegri as new coach". Sky Sports. 16 July 2014. Archived from the original on 8 December 2015. Retrieved 1 December 2015. 
  36. ^ a b c "Antonio Conte: 7 things to know about Chelsea's new manager". ESPN. 4 April 2016. Archived from the original on 10 June 2016. Retrieved 19 September 2017. 
  37. ^ Riggio, Salvatore (14 December 2015). "Gran Galà del Calcio: è dominio Juve, miglior squadra e miglior allenatore". Sport Mediaset (in Italian). Archived from the original on 15 December 2015. Retrieved 15 December 2015. 
  38. ^ "Gran Galà del calcio, la notte delle stelle" (in Italian). Sky.it. 30 January 2017. Archived from the original on 3 February 2017. Retrieved 31 January 2017. 

External links

  • (in Italian) List of Oscar del Calcio winners up to 2010 on the AIC official website
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