September 1944

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
1944
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
01 02
03 04 05 06 07 08 09
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30

The following events occurred in September 1944:

September 1, 1944 (Friday)

September 2, 1944 (Saturday)

September 3, 1944 (Sunday)

September 4, 1944 (Monday)

September 5, 1944 (Tuesday)

September 6, 1944 (Wednesday)

September 7, 1944 (Thursday)

September 8, 1944 (Friday)

September 9, 1944 (Saturday)

September 10, 1944 (Sunday)

September 11, 1944 (Monday)

September 12, 1944 (Tuesday)

September 13, 1944 (Wednesday)

September 14, 1944 (Thursday)

September 15, 1944 (Friday)

September 16, 1944 (Saturday)

  • The Soviet 3rd Ukrainian Front occupied the Bulgarian capital of Sofia.[19]
  • The Second Quebec Conference ended.
  • In accordance with a call from the Danish National Council in London (not actually a government in exile but an association of free Danes), workers in Denmark went on strike starting at noon to protest the transfer of about 190 Danish political prisoners to Germany. The strike mostly affected the transportation system.[20]
  • Died: Gustav Bauer, 74, Chancellor of Germany from 1919 to 1920

September 17, 1944 (Sunday)

September 18, 1944 (Monday)

September 19, 1944 (Tuesday)

September 20, 1944 (Wednesday)

September 21, 1944 (Thursday)

September 22, 1944 (Friday)

September 23, 1944 (Saturday)

  • The Soviet Army crossed into Hungarian territory.[12]
  • An RAF bombing raid destroyed an aqueduct on the Dortmund-Ems Canal and brought a halt to the shipment of prefabricated U-boat parts via this route.[28]
  • German submarine U-859 was torpedoed and sunk in the Strait of Malacca by British submarine Trenchant.
  • U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt made a campaign speech in Washington before the International Teamsters Brotherhood. He responded to a rumor that he'd sent a Navy destroyer to the Aleutian Islands to retrieve his Scottish Terrier Fala at great taxpayer expense by saying, "You know, Fala is Scotch, and being a Scottie, as soon as he learned that the Republican fiction writers in Congress and out had concocted a story that I had left him behind on the Aleutian Islands and had sent a destroyer back to find him— at a cost to the taxpayers of two or three, or eight or twenty million dollars- his Scotch soul was furious. He has not been the same dog since. I am accustomed to hearing malicious falsehoods about myself—such as that old, worm-eaten chestnut that I have represented myself as indispensable. But I think I have a right to resent, to object to libelous statements about my dog." Roosevelt drew huge laughs from the audience and the speech became a defining moment in the campaign.[29][30]
  • Died: Harry Chandler, 80, American newspaper publisher and real estate mogul

September 24, 1944 (Sunday)

September 25, 1944 (Monday)

September 26, 1944 (Tuesday)

September 27, 1944 (Wednesday)

September 28, 1944 (Thursday)

  • Soviet, Yugoslav Partisan and Bulgarian forces began the Belgrade Offensive.
  • Winston Churchill made a speech in the House of Commons reviewing the progress of the war and announcing that a Jewish brigade would be formed to take part in active operations. "I know there is a vast number of Jews serving with our forces and the American forces throughout all the armies, but it seems to me indeed appropriate that a special Jewish unit of that race which has suffered indescribable torment from the Nazis should be represented as a distinct formation among the forces gathered for their final overthrow," Churchill explained. "I have no doubt that they will not only take part in the struggle but also in the occupation which will follow."[35]
  • Died: Josef Bürckel, 49, German Nazi politician (apparent complications from exhaustion)

September 29, 1944 (Friday)

September 30, 1944 (Saturday)

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "1944". MusicAndHistory. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b "War Diary for Friday, 1 September 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  3. ^ "Movie Review -Arsenic and Old Lace". The New York Times. September 2, 1944. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  4. ^ "War Diary for Saturday, 2 September 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b "1944". World War II Database. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  6. ^ a b "War Diary for Monday, 4 September 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  7. ^ a b "The Liberation of Belgium (2 September - 4 February 1945)". Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  8. ^ a b "Chronology 1944". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  9. ^ a b c d Mercer, Derrik, ed. (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 609. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  10. ^ a b "Conflict Timeline, September 4-13 1944". OnWar.com. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  11. ^ "History for September 6". On-This-Day.com. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  12. ^ a b Lindeman, Yehudi (2007). Shards of Memory: Narratives of Holocaust Survival. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers. p. 206. ISBN 978-0-275-99423-5. 
  13. ^ Heal, Clare (September 7, 2014). "The day Hitler's silent killer came falling on Chiswick". Daily Express. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  14. ^ "War Diary for Monday, 11 September 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  15. ^ a b "War Diary for Tuesday, 12 September 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  16. ^ a b c Chen, C. Peter. "Gothic Line Offensive". World War II Database. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  17. ^ a b "War Diary for Wednesday, 13 September 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  18. ^ a b Davidson, Edward; Manning, Dale (1999). Chronology of World War Two. London: Cassell & Co. p. 213. ISBN 0-304-35309-4. 
  19. ^ "War Diary for Saturday, 16 September 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  20. ^ a b Heiber, Helmut; Glantz, David M., eds. (2002). Hitler and His Generals: Military Conferences 1942–1945. Enigma Books. p. 1010. ISBN 978-1-929631-28-5. 
  21. ^ Dando-Collins, Stephen (2015). Operation Chowhound: The Most Risky, Most Glorious US Bomber Mission of WWII. New York: St. Martin's Press. p. 47. ISBN 978-1-137-27963-7. 
  22. ^ "Conflict Timeline, September 14-23 1944". OnWar.com. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  23. ^ "Challenges F. R. One-Man Theory". The Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington: p. 1. September 20, 1944. 
  24. ^ "War Diary for Wednesday, 20 September 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  25. ^ Peaslee, Amos Jenkins (1956). Constitutions of Nations, Volume III: Nicaragua to Yugoslavia. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff. p. 254. 
  26. ^ "Cards Defeat Braves Twice to Clinch Flag". Chicago Daily Tribune. Chicago. September 22, 1944. p. Part 2 p. 1. 
  27. ^ "22 September 1944: From one occupation to another". Estonia.eu. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  28. ^ Davidson and Manning, p. 215.
  29. ^ "September 1944". Franklin D. Roosevelt Day by Day. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  30. ^ "Fala, the dog who helped win a presidential election". National Constitution Center. September 23, 2014. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  31. ^ "Italy to Reopen Matteotti Murder Case Under New Law". Chicago Daily Tribune. Chicago: Chicago Daily Tribune. September 25, 1944. p. 1. 
  32. ^ "War Diary for Monday, 25 September 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  33. ^ a b "Events occurring on Tuesday, September 26, 1944". WW2 Timelines. 2011. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  34. ^ "War Diary for Wednesday, 27 September 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  35. ^ "Review of Military and Political Situations". ibiblio. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  36. ^ "War Diary for Saturday, 30 September 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=September_1944&oldid=771301925"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_1944
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "September 1944"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA