Selena singles discography

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Selena singles discography
Singles 27
Promotional singles 8
Other appearances 3

American singer Selena released twenty-seven official singles, seven promotional singles, and made five guest vocalist appearances. Her career began as the lead vocalist of Los Dinos in 1980. Her albums with Los Dinos on indie labels failed to achieve any chart success.[1] In 1987, her cover of Ritchie Valens' "La Bamba" peaked at number 19 on the United States Billboard Hot Latin Songs chart, her first entry. She signed with EMI Latin nine years later as a solo artist though her band continued to tour with her.[2] Selena appeared on "Buenos Amigos" with Salvadoran singer Álvaro Torres. The track peaked at number one on the U.S. Hot Latin Songs chart in 1991, the singer's first number one song. Subsequent singles, "Baila Esta Cumbia" and "Como la Flor", became popular songs on Mexican radio,[3] with "Como la Flor" launching the singer's career in that country.[4][5] "Como la Flor" peaked at number six on the Hot Latin Songs chart, despite popular culture claims that it was the singer's first number one single.[6][7] The track has charted on the U.S. Regional Mexican Digital Songs list since its inception in 2010 and remains the singer's signature number and most popular recording.[8]

Selena's live recording entitled Live (1993) contained three studio tracks and produced two, top five U.S. singles "No Debes Jugar" and "La Llamada". After her collaboration with the Barrio Boyzz on the single "Donde Quiera Que Estés" peaked at number one on the Hot Latin Songs chart, Selena released her fourth studio album Amor Prohibido (1994). The album continued the singer's streak of US number one singles with "Amor Prohibido", "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom", "No Me Queda Más", and The Pretenders' cover "Fotos y Recuerdos". The latter peaked at number one posthumously following the shooting death of Selena on March 31, 1995.[9] "Amor Prohibido" and "No Me Queda Más" became the most successful U.S. Latin singles of 1994 and 1995, respectively.[10][11] At the time of her death, Selena was in the process of crossing over into the American pop market.[12] Recording labels EMI Latin and EMI Records jointly released Dreaming of You several months after her death. Fearful that the song might cannibalize sales of the album in the U.S., EMI Records released "I Could Fall in Love" as a promotional single.[13] It became the highest charting English-language song on the Hot Latin Songs chart for two years and became her first number one single in Canada.[14] The title track, "Dreaming of You" became the highest charting Billboard Hot 100 song of the singer's career, peaking at number 22. Her cover of Pedro Infante's "Tú Sólo Tú" peaked at number one on the Hot Latin Songs for ten consecutive weeks; the longest number-one single of her career. "I'm Getting Used to You" peaked at number one on the U.S. Dance/Electronic Singles Sales; her first number one on that chart.[15]

Selena's last recorded song, "A Boy Like That" (a cover song from the 1967 musical West Side Story) was part of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences honoring the musical.[16] The song was also a benefit recording for AIDS Project Los Angeles.[17] It peaked at number four on the U.S. Dance Club Songs chart after its release in 1996. In 2002, Selena's brother and music producer A.B. Quintanilla mashed "Como la Flor", "Amor Prohibido", and "Si Una Vez" into a medley entitled "Con Tanto Amor Medley" to promote the album Ones.[18] Since Billboard magazine began monitoring music downloads in 2010,[19] Selena's songs re-entered the U.S. charts including first time entries "La Carcacha" (1990), "Ya Ves" (1990), "Enamorada de Ti" (1990), "Baila Esta Cumbia" (1992), and "El Chico del Apartamento 512" (1994).[20]

Singles

Solo career

Title Year Peak chart positions Sales Album
US
[21]
US Adult
[22]
US Latin
[23]
US Latin Pop
[24]
US Regional Mex
[25]
CAN
[26][27]
"Contigo Quiero Estar" 1989 Selena
"Sukiyaki"
"Mentiras"
"Baila Esta Cumbia" 1990 Ven Conmigo
"Ya Ves"
"La Tracalera"
"La Carcacha" 1992 Entre a Mi Mundo
"Como la Flor" 6 9
"¿Qué Creias?" 14
"Amame" 1993 27
"No Debes Jugar" 3 Selena Live!
"La Llamada" 5
"Amor Prohibido" 1994 1 5 Amor Prohibido
"Bidi Bidi Bom Bom" 1 11 4
"No Me Queda Más" 1 13 1
"Fotos y Recuerdos" 1995 1 12 1
"Dreaming of You" 22 9 11 9 30 Dreaming of You
"Techno Cumbia" 4 4
"El Toro Relajo" 24 14
"I'm Getting Used to You" 1996 [A] 23 65
"Siempre Hace Frio" 2 2 Siempre Selena
"No Quiero Saber" 6 10 15
"Costumbres" 15 13
"Disco Medley" 1997 25 8 Selena: The Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
"—" denotes a recording that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

Selena y Los Dinos singles

Title Year Peak chart positions Album
US Latin
[30]
"La Bamba" 1987 19 And the Winner Is...
"Soy Amiga (A.B. Quintanilla III Remix)" 2015 non-album single
"—" denotes a recording that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

Promotional singles and other charted songs

Title Year Peak chart positions Album
US Adult
[22]
US Dance
[31]
US Rhythmic
[30]
US Latin
[23]
US Latin Pop
[24]
US Regional
[25]
CAN
[32]
"Missing My Baby" 1992 22 Entre a Mi Mundo
"I Could Fall in Love" 1995 12 5 2 1 5 10 Dreaming of You
"Tú Sólo Tú" 1 1
"A Boy Like That" 1997 4 Selena: The Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
"Where Did the Feeling Go?"
"Is It the Beat?"
"Con Tanto Amor Medley" 2002 Ones
"Puede Ser"
(with Nando "Guero" Dominguez)
2004 Momentos Intimos
"—" denotes a recording that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

Other appearances

List of singles, with selected chart positions
Title Year Peak chart positions Album
US Latin
[23]
US Latin Pop
[24]
US Regional Mexican
[25]
"Buenos Amigos"
(with Álvaro Torres)
1991 1 Nada Se Compara Contigo
"Donde Quiera Que Estés"
(with the Barrio Boyzz)
1994 1 1 Donde Quiera Que Estes
"Baila Esta Kumbia"
(with the Kumbia Kings)
2005 44 16 Duetos
"—" denotes a recording that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "I'm Getting Used to You" did not enter the Billboard Hot 100, but peaked at number seven on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.[29]

References

  1. ^ Burr 1999, p. 188.
  2. ^ Hewitt, Bill (April 17, 1995). "Before Her Time". People. 43 (15). Retrieved January 29, 2015. 
  3. ^ Castrellón 2007, p. 84.
  4. ^ Tarradell, Mario (March 16, 1997). "Selena's Power: Culture Fusion". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved November 18, 2011. 
  5. ^ Malone 2003, p. 158.
  6. ^ Pérez 2009, p. 120.
  7. ^ García 2002, p. 164.
  8. ^ Clark 2013, p. 120.
  9. ^ Sam Howe Verhovek (April 1, 1995). "Grammy Winning Singer Selena Killed in Shooting at Texas Motel". The New York Times. p. 1. Retrieved October 24, 2011. 
  10. ^ Nielsen Business Media, Inc (November 28, 1998). "Topping The Charts Year By Year". Billboard. 110 (48): LMQ3. Retrieved March 3, 2010. 
  11. ^ Rivas, Jorge (March 31, 2011). "Remembering Selena's Trailblazing Music". Colorlines. Retrieved April 14, 2011. 
  12. ^ Patoski 1996, p. 115.
  13. ^ McKenna, Jerry (28 October 1995). "Hot 100 Singles Spotlight". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 107 (43): 116. Retrieved 27 June 2012. 
  14. ^ Lannert, John (February 28, 1998). "Artists & Music". Billboard. 110 (9): 86. Retrieved June 25, 2012. 
  15. ^ Nielsen Business Media, Inc (1996). "Billboard Hot Dance Breakouts". Billboard. 108 (15): 104. Retrieved April 26, 2011. 
  16. ^ Lannert, John (April 5, 1997). "Finishing Touches to Latin Confab". Billboard. 109 (14): 38. Retrieved April 18, 2016. 
  17. ^ Ruhlmann, William. "Album Reviews > The Songs of West Side Story". AllMusic. Retrieved April 18, 2016. 
  18. ^ Taylor, Chuck (October 19, 2002). "Singles Reviews". Billboard. 114 (42): 20. Retrieved April 18, 2016. 
  19. ^ "Latin Digital Songs > January 23, 2010". Billboard. Retrieved April 14, 2016. 
  20. ^ First time entries
    • "Regional Mexican Digital Songs > April 9, 2011". Billboard. Retrieved 25 June 2016. 
    • "Regional Mexican Digital Songs > April 21, 2012". Billboard. Retrieved 25 June 2016. 
    • "Regional Mexican Digital Songs > May 12, 2012". Billboard. Retrieved 25 June 2016. 
    • "Regional Mexican Digital Songs > April 18, 2015". Billboard. Retrieved 25 June 2016. 
  21. ^ "Selena > Chart history > Hot 100". Billboard. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  22. ^ a b "Selena > Chart history > Adult Contemporary Tracks". Billboard. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  23. ^ a b c Peak chart positions on the Hot Latin Tracks:
    • "Selena, the Queen of Tejano Music". Legacy.com. Retrieved October 11, 2011. 
    • "Hot Latin Tracks > Chart history > Selena". Billboard. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
    • "Techno Cumbia > Chart history". Billboard. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  24. ^ a b c "Selena > Chart history > Latin Pop Airplay". Billboard. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  25. ^ a b c "Selena > Chart history > Latin Regional Mexican Airplay". Billboard. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  26. ^ "RPM Top 100 Singles > February 19, 1996". RPM. Retrieved April 11, 2015. 
  27. ^ "Top 100 Singles > July 8, 1996". Billboard. 63 (21). July 8, 1996. Retrieved May 11, 2015. 
  28. ^ Ben-Yehuda, Ayala (February 19, 2010). "15 years after her murder, Selena still sells". Reuters. Retrieved December 7, 2011. 
  29. ^ Nielsen Business Media, Inc (April 13, 1996). "Billboard Hot Dance Breakouts/Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles". Billboard. 108 (15): 30, 99. Retrieved May 11, 2015. 
  30. ^ a b "Chart Singles > Selena". AllMusic. Retrieved April 18, 2016. 
  31. ^ Nielsen Business Media, Inc (1996). "Billboard Hot Dance Breakouts Chart". Billboard. 108 (10): 100. Retrieved May 6, 2011. 
  32. ^ "Canadian Top Singles > October 30, 1995". RPM. 62 (13). October 1995. Retrieved May 30, 2012. 

Sources

External links

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