Seasoned salt

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Typical seasoned salt
Lawry's, the most common brand of seasoned salt in the US

Seasoned salt is a blend of table salt, herbs, spices, other flavourings,[1] and sometimes monosodium glutamate (MSG).[2] It is sold in supermarkets and is commonly used in fish and chip shops and other take-away food shops. Seasoned salt is often the standard seasoning on foods such as chicken, French fries, deep-fried seafood, and potatoes.[3]


USA

Seasoned salt

The seasoned salt industry in the United States sells $100 million USD in seasoned salt annually. According to the US Federal Trade Commission two brands make up 80% of that market. [4]

Lawry's

Lawry's the oldest commonly used "seasoned salt" in the US was originally developed for seasoning steaks in the 1930s. [5][6]

Morton Season-all

Season-All is the #2 Seasoned salt in the US by marketshare. [7]

Anti-Trust Issues

The combined marketshare of Lawry's seasoned salt and Season-all was of sufficient concern that the FTC required McCormick the former owner of the Season-all brand to sell ("Divest") the Season-all brand to Morton as a condition of McCormick purchasing Lawry's seasonings in 2008. [8]

UK

Chip Spice

Invented in the 1970s in the English city of Hull and claimed to have been inspired by american seasonings. [9] The "chip spice" variant was introduced into the United Kingdom in the 1970s in Kingston upon Hull by the Spice Blender company; the recipe was based on American spiced salts containing paprika.[10]

Australia

Chicken salt

Chicken Salt was originally developed in the 1970s to season chicken for rotisseries. [11]

The first recipe for chicken salt consisted of onion powder, garlic powder, celery salt, paprika, chicken bouillon and monosodium glutamate with some curry powder.[12] Chicken salt is not related to the chicken flavouring or seasoning found on potato crisps, although it can be similar in appearance (both have a slight yellow colouring). There are versions of chicken salt that use chicken flavoring as well as vegan versions. [13]

Ingredients

Ingredients vary by recipe or manufacturer. Common herbs and spices may include:

Also, for an umami taste:

See also

References

  1. ^ "Seasoned Salt". iFoodTV. Archived from the original on 29 October 2013. Retrieved 30 December 2011. 
  2. ^ Campbell, Regina (2003). Regina's International Vegetarian Favorites. p. 153. 
  3. ^ Brown, Deborah (19 February 2009). "A grain of chicken salt is too much". Sydney Morning Herald. 
  4. ^ https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2008/07/ftc-challenges-mccormicks-acquisition-unilevers-lawrys-and
  5. ^ http://www.latimes.com/food/dailydish/la-dd-lawrys-prime-rib-125-20130520-story.html
  6. ^ https://www.discoverlosangeles.com/blog/lawrys-prime-rib-story-la-icon
  7. ^ http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2008-07-31/business/0807300123_1_lawry-seasoned-salt-maker-mccormick
  8. ^ https://www.crowell.com/NewsEvents/AlertsNewsletters/all/McCormick-Agrees-to-Divest-Seasoned-Salt-Business
  9. ^ https://www.hull2017.co.uk/discover/article/sprinkle-of-spice/
  10. ^ "One Hull Of A Story: The History Of Chip Spice", www.weirdretro.org.uk, retrieved 24 March 2017 
  11. ^ https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/apr/04/chicken-salt-the-rise-and-fall-and-rise-again-of-australias-favourite-condiment
  12. ^ Liaw, Adam (10 April 2018). "Chicken salt: we find the creator of an Australian classic – and he tells us everything". the Guardian. Retrieved 10 April 2018. 
  13. ^ https://www.epicurious.com/expert-advice/what-is-chicken-salt-australian-article
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