SM U-52

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
SM U 52 meeting U 35 800px.jpg
SM U-52 (right) meeting U-35 (left)
History
German Empire
Name: U-52
Ordered: 23 August 1914
Builder: Germaniawerft, Kiel
Laid down: 13 March 1915
Launched: 8 December 1915
Commissioned: 16 March 1916
Fate: 21 November 1918 - Surrendered. Broken up at Swansea in 1922.
General characteristics [1]
Class and type: Type U 51 submarine
Displacement:
  • 715 t (704 long tons) surfaced
  • 902 t (888 long tons) submerged
Length:
Beam:
  • 6.44 m (21 ft 2 in) (oa)
  • 4.18 m (13 ft 9 in) (pressure hull)
Height: 7.82 m (25 ft 8 in)
Draught: 3.64 m (11 ft 11 in)
Installed power:
  • 2 × 2,400 PS (1,765 kW; 2,367 shp) surfaced
  • 2 × 1,200 PS (883 kW; 1,184 shp) submerged
Propulsion: 2 shafts
Speed:
  • 17.1 knots (31.7 km/h; 19.7 mph) surfaced
  • 9.1 knots (16.9 km/h; 10.5 mph) submerged
Range:
  • 9,400 nmi (17,400 km; 10,800 mi) at 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) surfaced
  • 55 nmi (102 km; 63 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph) submerged
Test depth: 50 m (164 ft 1 in)
Complement: 36
Armament:
Service record
Part of:
  • Imperial German Navy
  • I Flotilla
  • unknown start – 25 May 1916
  • II Flotilla
  • 25 May – 24 December 1916
  • Pola Flotilla
  • 24 December 1916 – 27 April 1917
  • II Flotilla
  • 27 April 1917 – 11 November 1918
Commanders:
  • Kptlt. Hans Walther[2]
  • 8 May 1916 – 18 September 1917
  • Oblt.z.S. Johannes Spieß[3]
  • 19 September – 29 October 1917
  • Kptlt. Siegfried Claaßen[4]
  • 17 November – 28 February 1917
  • Kptlt. Waldemar Haumann[5]
  • 1 March – 5 May 1918
  • Kptlt. Franz Krapohl[6]
  • 6 May – 11 November 1918[7]
Operations: 4 patrols
Victories:
  • 32 ships sunk (89,925 tons GRT)
  • 5 ships damaged (13,707 GRT)

SM U-52 was one of 329 submarines serving in the Imperial German Navy in World War I. U-52 was engaged in the naval warfare and took part in the First Battle of the Atlantic.

U-52 was noted for sinking two warships, the first warship (and second kill) being the Royal Navy's light cruiser HMS Nottingham, sunk in the North Sea on August 19, 1916 at 55°34′N 00°12′E / 55.567°N 0.200°E / 55.567; 0.200. Thirty-eight men were lost.[8]

The sinking of Nottingham was an important event in the German Imperial Navy's action of August 19.[9]

At that time Otto Ciliax was watch officer on board the submarine. He later became an admiral in the Kriegsmarine.[10]

U-52's second warship kill was the French battleship Suffren, sunk 90 miles (140 km) west of Portugal at 39°30′N 11°00′W / 39.500°N 11.000°W / 39.500; -11.000.[11] on 26 November 1916. All 648 men were lost as the torpedo ignited a magazine and the ship sank within seconds.

In 1928, one of the ordinary seamen of U-52, Julius Schopka, published his memoirs of the years on the boat. Schopka was by then living in Iceland and his book was published in Icelandic, co-written by journalist Árni Óla. It was called Kafbátahernaðurinn (The Submarine Warfare).[12][13]

Summary of raiding history

Date Name Nationality Tonnage[Note 1] Fate[14]
11 July 1916 HMT Onward  Royal Navy 266 Sunk
19 August 1916 HMS Nottingham  Royal Navy 5,400 Sunk
26 September 1916 HMY Conqueror II  Royal Navy 526 Sunk
26 September 1916 HMT Sarah Alice  Royal Navy 299 Sunk
26 September 1916 St. Gothard  United Kingdom 2,788 Sunk
25 November 1916 Egyptiana  United Kingdom 3,818 Damaged
25 November 1916 Suffren  French Navy 12,750 Sunk
10 December 1916 Emma Laurans  France 2,153 Sunk
30 March 1917 Michelina Catalano  Kingdom of Italy 78 Sunk
4 April 1917 Missourian  United States 7,924 Sunk
4 April 1917 Ravenna  Kingdom of Italy 4,101 Sunk
5 April 1917 Angel Marina  Kingdom of Italy 257 Sunk
7 April 1917 Seward  United States 2,471 Sunk
8 April 1917 Alba  Kingdom of Italy 1,639 Sunk
9 April 1917 Esterel  France 2,574 Sunk
11 April 1917 Ansgar  Denmark 301 Sunk
12 April 1917 Glencliffe  United Kingdom 3,673 Sunk
14 April 1917 Tres Macs  Portugal 163 Sunk
15 April 1917 Cabo Blanco  Spain 2,163 Damaged
16 April 1917 Crios  Greece 4,116 Sunk
19 April 1917 Senhora Da Conceicao  Portugal 206 Sunk
20 April 1917 Caithness  United Kingdom 3,500 Sunk
21 April 1917 HMS Heather  Royal Navy 1,250 Damaged
23 April 1917 Acadia  Norway 1,556 Sunk
6 July 1917 Flora  Norway 818 Sunk
9 July 1917 Prince Abbas  United Kingdom 2,030 Sunk
11 July 1917 Vanda  Sweden 1,646 Sunk
12 July 1917 Fredrika  Sweden 1,851 Sunk
17 July 1917 HMS C34  Royal Navy 321 Sunk
20 August 1917 Bulysses  United Kingdom 6,127 Sunk
1 September 1917 Tarapaca  France 2,506 Sunk
2 September 1917 Wentworth  United Kingdom 3,828 Sunk
4 September 1917 Peerless  United Kingdom 3,112 Sunk
5 September 1917 Echunga  United Kingdom 6,285 Sunk
5 September 1917 San Dunstano  United Kingdom 6,220 Damaged
11 September 1917 Tobol  Russian Empire 3,741 Sunk
16 August 1918 HMT Fylde  Royal Navy 256 Damaged

References

Notes

  1. ^ Merchant ship tonnages are in gross register tons. Military vessels are listed by tons displacement.

Citations

  1. ^ Gröner 1991, pp. 8-10.
  2. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Hans Walther (Pour le Mérite)". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 5 January 2015.
  3. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Johannes Spieß (Royal House Order of Hohenzollern)". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 5 January 2015.
  4. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Siegfried Claaßen". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 5 January 2015.
  5. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Waldemar Haumann". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 5 January 2015.
  6. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Franz Krapohl". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 5 January 2015.
  7. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boats: U 52". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 5 January 2015.
  8. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Ships hit during WWI: Nottingham". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 5 January 2015.
  9. ^ http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/weapons_HMS_Nottingham.html
  10. ^ http://www.feldgrau.com/kmsorg.html
  11. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Ships hit during WWI: Suffren". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 5 January 2015.
  12. ^ http://landogsaga.is/section.php?id=3709&id_art=3821
  13. ^ http://timarit.is/view_page_init.jsp?issId=239478
  14. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Ships hit by U 52". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 5 January 2015.

Bibliography

  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4.

Coordinates: 54°33′06″N 10°16′40″E / 54.55167°N 10.27778°E / 54.55167; 10.27778

Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=SM_U-52&oldid=861713024"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SM_U-52
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "SM "; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA