Raymond Chandler bibliography

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Raymond Chandler (1888–1959) was an American-British novelist and screenwriter. He was born in Chicago, Illinois and lived in the US until he was seven, when his parents separated and his Anglo-Irish mother brought him to live near London; he was educated at Dulwich College from 1900.[1][2] After working briefly for the British Civil Service, he became a part-time teacher at Dulwich, supplementing his income as a journalist and writer—mostly for The Westminster Gazette and The Academy.[2] His output—consisting largely of poems and essays—was not to his taste, and his biographer Paul Bishop considers the work as "lifeless", while Contemporary Authors describes it as "lofty in subject and mawkish in tone".[3] Chandler returned to the US in 1912 where he trained to become an accountant in Los Angeles.[4] In 1917 he enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force, saw combat in the trenches in France where he was wounded, and was undergoing flight training in the fledgling Royal Air Force when the war ended.[5]

Chandler returned to the US in 1919 to rekindle his literary career, but instead took a job with an oil company until he was fired in 1932 following a bout of depression, womanizing and heavy drinking.[2] He began writing crime stories for the pulp magazines Black Mask, Detective Fiction Weekly, The Fortnightly Intruder and Dime Detective.[1] The stories were subsequently brought together in collected editions.[6] In 1939, at the behest of the publisher Alfred A. Knopf, Sr., Chandler wrote his first novel, The Big Sleep, for which he used parts of his short stories "Killer in the Rain" (1935) and "The Curtain" (1936).[7][8] He went on to write seven novels, many of which featured the character Philip Marlowe.[3]

In 1944 Chandler was asked by Paramount Pictures to write the script for the film Double Indemnity with Billy Wilder; the film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.[9] It was the first of seven scripts Chandler wrote, although two of them were unused.[10] In 1959 Chandler died of pneumonia, brought on by alcoholism.[2] In the aftermath of his death, many of his unpublished writings—including letters, literary criticism and prose and poetry—were released. His biographer Tom Williams considers that Chandler's name has become "a touchstone for crime writing, representing not just excellent fiction, but also a type of writing that is at once powerful and beautiful."[11]

Publications in periodicals and newspapers

"The Rose Leaf Romance" and "Organ Music" are two early short stories that were included in a collection, but their first printing is unknown.[12]

Chandler's stories in periodicals and newspapers
Title[13] Date of
publication
Periodical Notes
"The Unknown Love" December 19, 1908 Chambers's Journal Poem
"The Poet's Knowledge" March 3, 1909 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"The Soul's Defiance" March 5, 1909 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"The Wheel" March 25, 1909 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"Art" April 16, 1909 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"A Woman's Way" April 22, 1909 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"The Quest" June 2, 1909 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"When I was King" June 9, 1909 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"The Hour of Chaos" June 18, 1909 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"The Bed of Roses" June 29, 1909 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"The Reformer" July 29, 1909 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"The Perfect Knight" September 30, 1909 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"The Pilgrim in Mediation" November 8, 1909 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"The Pioneer" November 17, 1909 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"The Hermit" February 28, 1910 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"The Dancer" May 14, 1910 The Academy Poem
"The Death of the King" July 16, 1910 The Spectator Poem
"The Clay God" January 4, 1911 The Westminster Gazette Poem
(Untitled) March 18, 1911 The Academy Review of The Broad Highway by Jeffery Farnol
"The Unseen Planets" April 21, 1911 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"The Tears That Sweeten Woe" May 1, 1911 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"The Fairy King" May 3, 1911 The Westminster Gazette Poem
(Untitled) June 16, 1911 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"The Genteel Artist" August 19, 1911 The Academy Poem
"The Remarkable Hero" September 9, 1911 The Academy Essay
"The Literary Fop" November 4, 1911 The Academy Essay
"An Old House" November 15, 1911 The Westminster Gazette Poem
(Untitled) December 23, 1911 The Academy Book review of The Reason Why by Elinor Glyn
"Realism and Fairyland" January 6, 1912 The Academy Essay
"The Tropical Romance" January 20, 1912 The Academy Essay
"Houses to Let" February 24, 1912 The Academy Essay
"The King" March 1, 1912 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"Time Shall Not Die" April 25, 1912 The Westminster Gazette Poem
"The Art of Loving and Dying" June 22, 1912 The Academy Review of The Drama of Love and Death by Edward Carpenter
"The Rural Labourer at Home" June 22, 1912 The Academy Review of Change in the Village by George Bourne
"The Phrasemaker" June 29, 1912 The Academy Essay
"Blackmailers Don't Shoot" December 1933 Black Mask Story
"Smart-Aleck Kill" July 1934 Black Mask Story
"Finger Man" October 1934 Black Mask Story
"Killer in the Rain" January 1935 Black Mask Story
"Nevada Gas" June 1935 Black Mask Story
"Spanish Blood" November 1935 Black Mask Story
"Guns at Cyrano's" July 1936 Black Mask Story
"The Man Who Liked Dogs" March 1936 Black Mask Story
"Noon Street Nemesis" May 30, 1936 Detective Fiction Weekly Story
"Goldfish" June 1936 Black Mask Story
"The Curtain" September 1936 Black Mask Story
"Try the Girl" January 1937 Black Mask Story
"About the Article on Floral Arrangement" June 15, 1937 The Fortnightly Intruder Letter
"A Second Letter from R C Esq" July 1, 1937 The Fortnightly Intruder Letter
"Mandarin's Jade" November 1937 Dime Detective Story
"Red Wind" January 1938 Dime Detective Story
"The King in Yellow" March 1938 Dime Detective Story
"Bay City Blues" June 1938 Dime Detective Story
"The Lady in the Lake" January 1939 Dime Detective Story
"Pearls are a Nuisance" April 1939 Dime Detective Story
"Trouble is My Business" August 1939 Dime Detective Story
"I'll Be Waiting" October 14, 1939 The Saturday Evening Post Story
"The Bronze Door" November 1939 Unknown Story
"No Crime in the Mountains" September 1941 Detective Story Magazine Story
"The Simple Art of Murder" December 1944 The Atlantic Monthly Article
"Writers in Hollywood" November 1945 The Atlantic Monthly Article
"The Hollywood Bowl" January 1947 The Atlantic Monthly Review of The Golden Egg by James Pollock
 " 'Pros' and Cons" May 1947 Harper's Magazine Letter
"Critical Notes" July 1947 The Screen Writer
"Oscar Night in Hollywood" March 1948 The Atlantic Monthly Article
"Studies in Extinction" April 1948 The Atlantic Monthly Review of Murders Plain and Fanciful by James Sandoe
"10 Greatest Crimes of the Century" October 1948 Cosmopolitan Article
"The Little Sister" April 1949 Cosmopolitan Prepublication abridgement
"The Simple Art of Murder" April 15, 1950 The Saturday Review of Literature Article
(Untitled) May 1951 The Author Letter
"Professor Bingo's Snuff" June 1951 Park East Story
"Ten Per Cent of Your Life" February 1952 The Atlantic Monthly Article
(Untitled) July 1952 Fantastic Autobiographical note
"Ruth Ellis—Should She Hang" June 30, 1955 London Evening Standard Letter
"A Letter From London" September 1955 The Third Degree Letter
"Bonded Goods" March 25, 1956 The Sunday Times Review of Diamonds Are Forever by Ian Fleming
"Crosstown with Neil Morgan" March 1, 1957 San Diego Evening Tribune Guest Column
"Raymond Chandler Writes a Blunt Letter to the Daily Express" June 18, 1957 Daily Express Letter
"A Star Writer's Advice to Writers (and Editors)" June 18, 1957 Daily Express Letter
"Crosstown with Neil Morgan" July 12, 1957 San Diego Evening Tribune Guest Column
"Crosstown with Neil Morgan" March 8, 1958 San Diego Evening Tribune Guest Column
"The Terrible Dr No" March 30, 1958 The Sunday Times Review of Dr. No by Ian Fleming
"Playback" October 1958 Suspense Story
"Detective Story as an Art Form" March 1959 The Crime Writer Article
"Marlowe Takes on the Syndicate" 1959 – 10 April 1959 Daily Mail Story – published posthumously
"Crosstown with Neil Morgan" August 25, 1959 San Diego Evening Tribune Guest Column – published posthumously
"Raymond Chandler" December 1959 The London Magazine Appreciation of Chandler by Ian Fleming; includes letters from Chandler – published posthumously
"Private Eye" February 25, 1962 The Sunday Times Prepublication excerpts – published posthumously
"Farewell, My Hollywood" June 1976 Antaeus Article – published posthumously
"English Summer" August 1976 Antaeus Story – published posthumously
Interviews with Chandler
Title[13] Date of
publication
Periodical Notes
"He Makes Murder Pay" July 1946 Pageant Chandler interviewed by Irving Wallace
"Author of Big Sleep Succumbs to La Jolia" 1946 San Diego Daily Journal Chandler interviewed
"Air Fare: Chandler Likes Radio IF" July 1, 1947 San Diego Daily Journal Chandler interviewed by Terry Nolan
"The Unconventional Mr Chandler Comes to Town" September 21, 1952 The Sunday Times Chandler interviewed by Cyril Ray
"Gentle Tough Guy" March 6, 1953 John O'London's Weekly Chandler interviewed by Peter Forster
"Books Alive" April 10, 1955 Chicago Sunday Tribune Chandler interviewed by Vincent Starrett
"Raymond Chandler Now Says I Confess" April 25, 1955 Daily Express Chandler interviewed by René MacColl
"A Confession by Raymond Chandler" January 14, 1956 Daily Express Chandler interviewed by Merrick Winn
"Raymond Chandler Talks of James Bond" July 7, 1958 Daily Express Chandler interviewed by Donald Gomery

Novels

Chandler left an unfinished novel when he died. This was completed by Robert B. Parker and published in 1989 as Poodle Springs.[14]

The novels of Raymond Chandler
Title[3][15] Year of first
publication
First edition publisher Notes Ref.
The Big Sleep 1939 Alfred A. Knopf, New York Based on the short stories "Killer in the Rain" (1935) and "The Curtain" (1936). [7][16]
Farewell, My Lovely 1940 Alfred A. Knopf, New York Based on the short stories "The Man Who Liked Dogs" (1936), "Try The Girl" (1937) and "Mandarin's Jade" (1937). [17][18]
The High Window 1942 Alfred A. Knopf, New York Based on the short stories "Bay City Blues" (1938) and "The Lady In The Lake" (1939). [19][20]
The Lady in the Lake 1943 Alfred A. Knopf, New York Based on the short stories "Bay City Blues" (1938), "The Lady In The Lake" (1939), "No Crime In The Mountains" (1941). [19][21]
The Little Sister 1949 Hamish Hamilton, London Scenes based on the short story "Bay City Blues" (1938). [22]
The Long Good-bye 1953 Hamish Hamilton, London The first edition was in the UK, where it was published as The Long Good-Bye;[3] winner of the Edgar Award for Best Novel, 1955. Scenes based on the short story "The Curtain" (1936). [19][23]
Playback 1958 Hamish Hamilton, London Based on an unproduced screenplay. [24]

Short story collections

Chandler's short story collections
Title[3][25] Year of first
publication
First edition publisher Stories in the first edition Ref.
Five Murders 1944 Avon Books, New York
  • "Goldfish"
  • "Spanish Blood"
  • "Blackmailers Don't Shoot"
  • "Guns at Cyrano's"
  • "Nevada Gas"
[26]
Five Sinister Characters 1945 Avon Books, New York
  • "Trouble is My Business"
  • "Pearls Are a Nuisance"
  • "I'll Be Waiting"
  • "The King in Yellow"
  • "Red Wind"
[27]
Red Wind 1946 World Publishing Co, Cleveland, OH
  • "Red Wind"
  • "Blackmailers Don't Shoot"
  • "I'll Be Waiting"
  • "Goldfish"
  • "Guns at Cyrano's"
[28]
Spanish Blood 1946 World Publishing Co, Cleveland, OH
  • "Spanish Blood"
  • "The King in Yellow"
  • "Pearls Are a Nuisance"
  • "Nevada Gas"
  • "Trouble is My Business"
[29]
Finger Man, and Other Stories 1947 Avon Books, New York
  • "Finger Man"
  • "The Bronze Door"
  • "Smart-Aleck Kill"
[30]
The Simple Art of Murder 1950 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston
  • "Finger Man"
  • "Smart-Aleck Kill"
  • "Guns at Cyrano's"
  • "Pick-up on Noon Street"
  • "Goldfish"
  • "The King in Yellow"
  • "Pearls Are a Nuisance"
  • "I'll Be Waiting"
  • "Red Wind"
  • "Nevada Gas"
  • "Spanish Blood"
  • "Trouble is My Business"
  • "The Simple Art of Murder"
[31]
Trouble Is My Business 1950 Penguin Books, Harmondsworth
  • "Trouble Is My Business"
  • "Red Wind"
  • "I'll Be Waiting"
  • "Goldfish"
  • "Guns at Cyrano's"
[32]
Pick-up on Noon Street 1952 Pocket Books, New York
  • "Pick-up on Noon Street"
  • "Smart-Aleck Kill"
  • "Guns at Cyrano's"
  • "Nevada Gas"
[33]
Smart-Aleck Kill 1953 Hamish Hamilton, London
  • "Smart-Aleck Kill"
  • "Pick-up on Noon Street
  • "Nevada Gas"
  • "Spanish Blood"
[34]
Pearls Are a Nuisance 1958 Hamish Hamilton, London
  • "Pearls Are a Nuisance"
  • "Finger Man
  • "The King in Yellow"
  • "The Simple Art of Murder"
[35]
Killer in the Rain 1964 Hamish Hamilton, London
  • "Killer in the Rain"
  • "The Man Who Liked Dogs"
  • "The Curtain"
  • "Try the Girl"
  • "Mandarin's Jade"
  • "Bay City Blues"
  • "The Lady in the Lake"
  • "No Crime in the Mountains"
[36]
The Smell of Fear 1965 Hamish Hamilton, London
  • "Blackmailers"
  • "Don't Shoot"
  • "Pearls Are a Nuisance"
  • "Finger Man
  • "The King in Yellow"
  • "Smart-Aleck Kill
  • "Pick-up on Noon Street
  • "Nevada Gas"
  • "Spanish Blood"
  • "Trouble is My Business
  • "Red Wind"
  • "I'll Be Waiting"
  • "Goldfish"
  • "Guns at Cyrano's"
  • "The Pencil"
[37]

Scripts

Many of Chandler's works were used as the basis for films. The following are where he is credited as the writer of the performed script.[10]

Chandler's scripts
Title Year of release Studio Notes Ref.
Double Indemnity 1944 Paramount Pictures With Billy Wilder; nominated for the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay [38][39]
And Now Tomorrow 1944 Paramount Pictures With Frank Partos [40]
The Unseen 1945 Paramount Pictures With Hagar Wilde [41]
The Blue Dahlia 1946 Paramount Pictures Nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay [42][43]
Strangers on a Train 1951 Warner Bros. With Czenzi Ormonde [44]
Chandler's unproduced scripts
Title Year of release Studio Notes Ref.
The Innocent Mrs. Duff 1946 Paramount Pictures Based on The Innocent Mrs. Duff (1946) by Elisabeth Sanxay Holding [45]
Playback 1947–48 Universal Studios Original story, later converted to a novel of the same name [46]

Miscellany

Title[3] Year of first
publication
First edition publisher Category Notes Ref.
Raymond Chandler on Writing 1962 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston MA Letters, criticism and fiction Pamphlet containing material from Raymond Chandler Speaking published for promotional purposes; edited by Dorothy Gardiner and Kathrine Sorley Walker [47]
Raymond Chandler Speaking 1962 Hamish Hamilton, London Letters, criticism and fiction Edited by Dorothy Gardiner and Kathrine Sorley Walker [48]
Chandler before Marlowe: Raymond Chandler's Early Prose and Poetry, 1908–1912 1973 University of South Carolina Press, Columbia, SC Prose and poetry Edited by Matthew J. Bruccoli [49]
The Notebooks of Raymond Chandler, and "English Summer: A Gothic Romance" 1976 Ecco Press, New York, NY Prose and story Edited by Frank MacShane [50]
Raymond Chandler and James M. Fox: Letters 1979 Privately printed Letters [51]
Selected Letters of Raymond Chandler 1981 Columbia University Press, New York, NY Letters Edited by Frank MacShane [52]
Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe: A Centennial Celebration 1990 Perigee Books, New York, NY Stories Contains 23 Philip Marlowe stories by various writers; also contains Chandler's "The Pencil" [53]
Raymond Chandler: Stories and Early Novels 1995 Library of America, New York, NY Prose Edited by Frank MacShane [54]
Raymond Chandler: Later Novels and Other Writings 1995 Library of America, New York, NY Prose Edited by Frank MacShane [55]
The Raymond Chandler Papers: Selected Letters and Non-Fiction, 1909–1959 2000 Hamish Hamilton, London Letters and essays Edited by Tom Hiney and Frank MacShane [56]
The Princess and the Pedlar 1917 / discovered 2014 unpublished, Los Angeles comic operetta libretto Words by Raymond Chandler, Music by Julian Pascal [57]

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References and sources

References

  1. ^ a b Marling 2000.
  2. ^ a b c d McCarron 2004.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Raymond Chandler". Contemporary Authors. Gale. Retrieved April 26, 2016.  (subscription required)
  4. ^ Williams 2012, pp. 57–57.
  5. ^ Williams 2012, pp. 67–68.
  6. ^ Macleod 1988, p. 6.
  7. ^ a b Durham 1972, p. viii.
  8. ^ Williams 2012, pp. 142–43.
  9. ^ Macleod 1988, pp. 197–98.
  10. ^ a b Bruccoli 1979, pp. 135–36.
  11. ^ Williams 2012, p. 348.
  12. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 115.
  13. ^ a b Bruccoli 1979, pp. 115–24.
  14. ^ Weatherby, W. J. (November 25, 1989). "Arts: A Resurrection in Poodle Springs – Philip Marlowe Walks the Mean Streets Again". The Guardian. p. 32. 
  15. ^ Bishop 1984, p. 23.
  16. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 3.
  17. ^ Durham 1972, pp. viii–ix.
  18. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 13.
  19. ^ a b c Durham 1972, p. ix.
  20. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 19.
  21. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 26.
  22. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 43.
  23. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 56.
  24. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 63.
  25. ^ Moss 2000, p. 70.
  26. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 33.
  27. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 36.
  28. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 102.
  29. ^ Bruccoli 1979, pp. 102–03.
  30. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 39.
  31. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 50.
  32. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 103.
  33. ^ Bruccoli 1979, pp. 103–04.
  34. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 104.
  35. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 105.
  36. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 80.
  37. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 106.
  38. ^ "Double Indemnity". American Film Institute. Retrieved April 26, 2016. 
  39. ^ "The 17th Academy Awards 1945". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved May 7, 2016. 
  40. ^ "And Now Tomorrow". American Film Institute. Retrieved April 26, 2016. 
  41. ^ "The Unseen". American Film Institute. Retrieved April 26, 2016. 
  42. ^ "The Blue Dahlia". American Film Institute. Retrieved April 26, 2016. 
  43. ^ "The 19th Academy Awards 1947". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved May 7, 2016. 
  44. ^ "Strangers on a Train". American Film Institute. Retrieved April 26, 2016. 
  45. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 135.
  46. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 136.
  47. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 71.
  48. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 73.
  49. ^ Bruccoli 1979, p. 87.
  50. ^ Bruccoli 1979, pp. 96–97.
  51. ^ Reilly 1980, p. 285.
  52. ^ Athanasourelis, John Paul (September 22, 2003). "Film Adaptation and the Censors: 1940s Hollywood and Raymond Chandler; Critical Essay". Studies in the Novel. 35 (3): 325. ISSN 0039-3827. 
  53. ^ Kabatchnik 2012, p. 104.
  54. ^ Wyatt, Neal (February 15, 2014). "The Reader's Shelf; Trashy Pulps Spun into Literary Gold". Library Journal. p. 3. 
  55. ^ Brevda, William (March 22, 1999). "The Double Nihilation of the Neon: Raymond Chandler's Los Angeles; Nature, Law, and Representation". Texas Studies in Literature and Language. 41 (1): 70. ISSN 0040-4691. 
  56. ^ McCrum, Robert (December 3, 2000). "Long, Frank and Forlorn Goodbye". The Observer. Retrieved May 10, 2016. 
  57. ^ Weinman, Sarah (December 4, 2014). "Unpublished Raymond Chandler Work Discovered in Library of Congress". The Guardian. Retrieved December 2, 2014. 

Sources

  • Bishop, Paul (November 1984). "Raymond Chandler and the Philip Marlowe Stories". The Book and Magazine Collector. Diamond Publishing Group (9). 
  • Bruccoli, Matthew J. (1979). Raymond Chandler: A Descriptive Bibliography. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh. ISBN 978-0-8229-3382-3. 
  • Durham, Philip (1972). Introduction. Killer in the Rain. By Chandler, Raymond. New York: Ballantine. OCLC 21896745. 
  • Kabatchnik, Amnon (2012). Blood on the Stage, 1975–2000: Milestone Plays of Crime, Mystery, and Detection. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0-8108-8355-0. 
  • McCarron, Kevin (2004). "Chandler, Raymond Thornton (1888–1959)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/63651. Retrieved 26 May 2016.  (subscription or UK public library membership required)
  • Macleod, Helen (August 1988). "Collecting UK Editions of Raymond Chandler". The Book and Magazine Collector. Diamond Publishing Group (53). 
  • Marling, William. "Chandler, Raymond Thornton". American National Biography Online. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 26 May 2016.  (subscription required)
  • Moss, Robert F. (2000). "Raymond Chandler". In Anderson, George; Anderson, Julie. Dictionary of Literary Biography: American Hard-Boiled Crime Writers. Detroit: Gale Research. ISBN 978-0-7876-3135-2. 
  • Reilly, John (1980). Twentieth Century Crime & Mystery Writers. London: Macmillan. ISBN 978-1-349-81368-1. 
  • Williams, Tom (2012). Raymond Chandler, a Life. London: Aurum. ISBN 978-1-84513-526-3. 
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