Rappahannock County, Virginia

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Rappahannock County, Virginia
Rappahannock County Courthouse.jpg
Rappahannock County Courthouse in Washington, Virginia
Seal of Rappahannock County, Virginia
Seal
Map of Virginia highlighting Rappahannock County
Location in the U.S. state of Virginia
Map of the United States highlighting Virginia
Virginia's location in the U.S.
Founded 1833
Named for Rappahannock River
Seat Washington
Largest town Washington
Area
 • Total 267 sq mi (692 km2)
 • Land 266 sq mi (689 km2)
 • Water 0.8 sq mi (2 km2), 0.3%
Population (est.)
 • (2017) 7,321
 • Density 28/sq mi (11/km2)
Congressional district 5th
Time zone Eastern: UTC−5/−4
Website rappahannockcountyva.gov

Rappahannock County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, US. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,373.[1] Its county seat is Washington.[2] The name "Rappahannock" comes from the Algonquian word lappihanne (also noted as toppehannock), meaning "river of quick, rising water" or "where the tide ebbs and flows."

Rappahannock County is included in the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History

Rappahannock County was founded by an act of the Virginia General Assembly in 1833, based on the growing population's need to have better access to a county seat. The county's land was carved from Culpeper County. Rappahannock county was named for the river that separates it from Fauquier County.

Early History of Amissville

by Rappahannock Historical Society

The land on which the village of Amissville, Virginia, is now sited was owned in the early 1700s by Thomas 6th Lord Fairfax. It was part of the Northern Neck Proprietary, which consisted of 5.3 million acres of land located between the Rappahannock River and the Potomac River, from their headwaters to the Chesapeake Bay. In 1649 King Charles II of England, then in exile in France after the execution of his father, Charles I, had given this unmapped and unsettled region to seven loyal supporters. By 1688 the proprietary was owned solely by Thomas Lord Culpeper. Lord Culpeper's only child, a daughter, married Thomas 5th Lord Fairfax in 1690. They acquired the proprietary on the death of Lord Culpeper and the region became synonymous with the Fairfax name. In 1719, Thomas 6th Lord Fairfax inherited the land.

Land grants issued by the agents of King Charles II and by agents of the Northern Neck (Fairfax) Proprietary are housed in the archives of the Library of Virginia in Richmond, Virginia, and are now available online at the Library of Virginia website.[1]

During 1747 to 1766, Lord Fairfax granted land that encompassed the area of today’s Amissville to five individuals: Thomas Burk received 200 acres,[2] Samuel Scott received 270 acres and 470 acres,[3] James Genn received two grants of 400 acres each,[4] Gabriel Jones received 380 acres,[5] and Philip Edward Jones received 452 acres.[6]

It is widely believed that individuals with surnames Amiss and Bayse received land grants from Lord Fairfax in the Amissville area. However, there are no grants to anyone with these surnames recorded in the Virginia Colonial land grant books maintained by the Library of Virginia in Richmond, Virginia. Rather, Joseph Amiss and Edmond Bayse purchased existing land grants. On 14 July 1766, Joseph Amiss purchased the 380 acres that had been granted to Gabriel Jones for 40 pounds.[7] On 15 October 1770, Edmond Bayse purchased the 800 acres that had been granted to James Genn for 90 pounds.[8]

On 1 July 1794, Joseph Amiss distributed his land and slaves as gifts to his three living sons William, Philip, and Thomas, and his grandsons William (son of William) and John (son of Thomas).[9] In return, Joseph and his wife Constant were given a life estate to the property.[1] The sons and grandsons and their children purchased additional land in the Amissville area.

On 20 April 1778, Edmond Bayse gave his son Elijamon 190 acres of the 800 acres that Edmond had acquired in 1770.[2] This was the northern part of the 800 acres, located adjacent to today’s Route 211. Although Elijamon sold this land in 1789,[3] he and his children acquired other land in the Amissville area and became major landowners.

[1] Culpeper County Deed Book R, page 556; Constant is believed to be a daughter of Gabriel Jones

[2] Culpeper County Deed Book H, page 627

[3] Culpeper County Deed Book R, page 347

[1] www.lva.virginia.gov

[2] Library of Virginia, Richmond. Northern Neck Grants Book G, page 37

[3] Library of Virginia, Richmond. Northern Neck Grants Book G, page 38 and Book H, page 152

[4] Library of Virginia, Richmond. Northern Neck Grants Book G, pages 94 and 95

[5] Library of Virginia, Richmond. Northern Neck Grants Book M, page 186

[6] Library of Virginia, Richmond. Northern Neck Grants Book N, page 60

[7] Culpeper County Deed Book E, page 166-169

[8] Culpeper County Deed Book F, page 142

[9] Culpeper County Deed Book R, pages 508-517

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 267.2 square miles (692.0 km2), of which 266.4 sq mi (690.0 km2) is land and 0.8 sq mi (2.1 km2) (0.3%) is water.[3]

The Rappahannock River forms the northeastern boundary and separates Rappahannock County from Fauquier County. Rappahannock County is bounded on the southeast by Culpeper County and on the southwest by Madison County. The Blue Ridge Mountains occupy much of the western portion of the county.

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Mountains

The summits of the following mountains are located within Rappahannock County:

  • Pignut Mountain
  • Hogback Mountain
  • Castleton Mountain
  • Jenkins Mountain
  • Jefferson Mountain
  • Meetinghouse Mountain
  • Little Mulky Mountain
  • Little Jenkins Mountain
  • Googe Mountain
  • Round Mountain
  • Hickerson Mountain
  • Fork Mountain
  • Battle Mountain [4]
  • Little Battle Mountain
  • Piney Ridge
  • Pickerel Ridge
  • Poes Mountain
  • Turkey Mountain
  • Aaron Mountain
  • Red Oak Mountain
U.S. Route 211 as it passes through Rappahannock County; the Blue Ridge Mountains can be seen in the distance.

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 9,257
1850 9,782 5.7%
1860 8,850 −9.5%
1870 8,261 −6.7%
1880 9,291 12.5%
1890 8,678 −6.6%
1900 8,843 1.9%
1910 8,044 −9.0%
1920 8,070 0.3%
1930 7,717 −4.4%
1940 7,208 −6.6%
1950 6,112 −15.2%
1960 5,368 −12.2%
1970 5,199 −3.1%
1980 6,093 17.2%
1990 6,622 8.7%
2000 6,983 5.5%
2010 7,373 5.6%
Est. 2017 7,321 [5] −0.7%
Decennial Census[6]
1790–1960[7] 1900–1990[8]
1990–2000[9]

As of the census[10] of 2010, there were 7,373 people, 2,788 households, and 2,004 families residing in the county. The population density was 26 people per square mile (10/km2). There were 3,303 housing units, at an average density of 12 per square mile (5/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 92.64% White, 5.44% Black or African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.21% Asian, 0.40% from other races, and 1.15% from two or more races. 1.30% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 2,788 households, out of which 27.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.50% were married couples living together, 7.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.10% were non-families. 23.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50, and the average family size was 2.94.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 22.30% under the age of 18, 5.60% from 18 to 24, 26.40% from 25 to 44, 31.80% from 45 to 64, and 13.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $45,943, and the median income for a family was $51,848. Males had a median income of $32,725 versus $22,950 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,863. About 5.20% of families and 7.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.80% of those under age 18 and 3.20% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Board Of Supervisors

  • Roger Welch (R) – Chairman (Wakefield District)
  • Chris Parrish (R) – Vice-Chairman (Stonewall-Hawthorne District)
  • Christine Smith (D) – Piedmont District
  • John Lesinski (D) – (Hampton District)
  • Ron Frazier (R) – (Jackson District)

Politics

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[11]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 56.6% 2,539 39.0% 1,747 4.4% 197
2012 53.0% 2,311 45.4% 1,980 1.5% 66
2008 50.6% 2,227 47.8% 2,105 1.7% 73
2004 53.6% 2,172 45.4% 1,837 1.0% 41
2000 52.7% 1,850 41.6% 1,462 5.7% 201
1996 47.3% 1,505 44.2% 1,405 8.5% 271
1992 44.3% 1,410 40.0% 1,273 15.7% 498
1988 61.7% 1,657 37.3% 1,003 1.0% 26
1984 62.7% 1,696 36.9% 999 0.4% 12
1980 49.8% 1,179 44.6% 1,055 5.6% 133
1976 44.5% 881 54.1% 1,071 1.5% 29
1972 68.2% 1,055 30.5% 471 1.4% 21
1968 43.6% 594 28.9% 394 27.5% 375
1964 39.8% 449 59.9% 675 0.3% 3
1960 43.7% 426 55.8% 544 0.5% 5
1956 47.8% 514 48.7% 523 3.5% 38
1952 54.4% 619 45.5% 518 0.2% 2
1948 30.1% 311 59.7% 617 10.3% 106
1944 37.3% 297 62.4% 497 0.4% 3
1940 27.6% 225 72.1% 588 0.4% 3
1936 26.0% 241 73.9% 686 0.1% 1
1932 17.2% 124 81.9% 590 0.8% 6
1928 39.1% 329 60.9% 513
1924 17.6% 89 78.2% 395 4.2% 21
1920 33.3% 210 66.4% 418 0.3% 2
1916 17.1% 84 81.5% 401 1.4% 7
1912 19.8% 94 75.1% 356 5.1% 24

Education

The Rappahannock County Public Schools School District is located in Washington, VA and includes two schools that serve 921 students county-wide in grades PK through 12.

Among the private schools in the county are two pre-K thru 12 schools, Hearthstone School [1], and Wakefield Country Day School.there is one 6 thru 12 school, Belle Meade Farm School.

Communities

Town

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

See also

References

  1. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  4. ^ "A Gallium Anomaly Utilized in Palaeogeographic Reconstruction of Battle Mountain, Rappahannock County, Virginia". Kansas Academy of Science. 2016-04-01. Retrieved 2016-07-14.
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved March 30, 2018.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  11. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 10 April 2018.

External links

  • Rappahannock County, Virginia, the county government homepage
  • Rappahannock News, a print and online newspaper
  • Memorial Foundation of the Germanna Colonies in Virginia, Inc.
  • Rappahannock Historical Society, 328 Gay Street, Washington, VA 22747

Coordinates: 38°41′N 78°10′W / 38.69°N 78.17°W / 38.69; -78.17

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