Pyotr Novikov

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P. S. Novikov.

Pyotr Sergeyevich Novikov (Russian: Пётр Серге́евич Но́виков; 15 August 1901, Moscow, Russian Empire – 9 January 1975, Moscow, Soviet Union) was a Soviet mathematician.

Novikov is known for his work on combinatorial problems in group theory: the word problem for groups, and Burnside's problem. For proving the undecidability of the word problem in groups he was awarded the Lenin Prize in 1957.[1]

In 1953 he became a corresponding member of the USSR Academy of Sciences and in 1960 he was elected a full member.

He was married to the mathematician Lyudmila Keldysh (1904–1976). The mathematician Sergei Novikov is his son. Sergei Adian and Albert Muchnik were among his students.

References

  1. ^ S. I. Adian, Mathematical logic, the theory of algorithms and the theory of sets, AMS Bookstore, 1977, ISBN 0-8218-3033-3, p. 26. (being Novikov's Festschrift on the occasion of his seventieth birthday)

External links


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