Princes' School

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Princes' School is a school in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

History

King Abdulaziz ibn Abdul Rahman, founder of the school

The Princes' School was established by King Ibn Saud specifically to ensure a high level of education for members of the House of Saud and sons of other foremost Saudis.[1] In 1356 H[2] (corresponding to 1937), the school was reorganised and reopened on the second floor of Deera Palace.[3]

Early in the Ibn Saud newly established country the Council of Senior Scholars or ulema thought education should only involve studying the Qur'an and Sharia law. The school was located in Ibn Saud’s palace and the imam of the Grand Mosque of Mecca taught there.[4] The school was only conducted within the Royal court.[5]

Alumni

See also

References

  1. ^ "Biography of King Fahd bin Abdul Aziz Al-Saud". Babnet. Archived from the original on 2013-10-04. Retrieved 19 September 2015.
  2. ^ "New King Salman". Bilateral US-Arab Chamber of Commerce. Al Arabiya News. 29 January 2015. Retrieved 19 January 2019. King Salman Bin Abdul Aziz was born in Riyadh on 10/5/1354, corresponding to December 31, 1935. He received his early education at Princes’ School in Riyadh, which was established by King Abdulaziz in 1356 to provide education for his children. There he studied religion and modern science, and celebrated the completion of memorizing the whole Quran on Sunday, 12/8/1364 H. The school was managed by Sheikh Abdullah Al Khayat, imam and preacher of the Grand Mosque.
  3. ^ a b "King Fahd Bin Abdulaziz His Childhood (Birth and Upbringing)". Archived from the original on 20 January 2019. Retrieved 20 January 2019.
  4. ^ "New Saudi ruler King Salman bin Abdulaziz". Reuters. Reuters. 23 January 2015. Archived from the original on 2017-11-08. Retrieved 19 January 2019. Prince Salman was taught in the “princes’ school” set up in Ibn Saud’s palace by the imam of the Grand Mosque of Mecca, signaling the importance that Ibn Saud attached to the centrality of pure Islamic belief in the kingdom he created.
  5. ^ Bray, Barbara; Darlow, Michael (13 December 2013). Ibn Saud: The Desert Warrior Who Created the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. USA: Skyhorse Publishing. p. 608. ISBN 9781620874141.
  6. ^ "His royal highness Prince Salman bin Abdulaziz" Archived 2013-09-30 at the Wayback Machine. Ministry of Interior. Retrieved 12 May 2012.
  7. ^ "10 luxurious perks of being the new Saudi king". CBS News. Archived from the original on 2017-07-22. Retrieved 19 January 2019. Salman attended the Princes’ School in Riyadh. Not much is known about it, but it’s said that a previous king founded it specifically for royals and the children of prominent Saudis.
  8. ^ "The King of The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia". Ministry of Education. Archived from the original on 2019-01-19. Retrieved 19 January 2019. King Salman received his early Education in the Princes' School in the Capital City Riyadh, a school established by Ibn Saud specifically to provide Education for his Children. He studied Religion, and Modern Science.
  9. ^ "King Fahd bin Abdul Aziz Al-Saud (1921-2005)". Al Bawaba. 1 August 2015. Archived from the original on 2015-10-02. Retrieved 19 January 2019. Fahd's education took place at the Princes' School in Riyadh, a school established by Ibn Saud specifically for the education of members of the House of Saud (the royal family of Saudi Arabia). While studying at the Princes' School, Fahd studied under well-known tutors including Sheikh Abdul-Ghani Khayat. Following his education at the Princes' School, Fahd moved on to the Religious Knowledge Institute in Mecca, where he studied Wahhabi Islam.
  10. ^ "Key figures". www.telegraph.co.uk. 1 January 2001. Retrieved 19 January 2019. He was born in Riyadh in 1923 and educated at the Princes' School, which was established by his father, King Abdul Aziz.
  11. ^ "Saudi royal court mourns Prince Fawaz bin Abdulaziz". Ain al Yaqeen. 29 July 2008. Archived from the original on 27 September 2013. Retrieved 4 May 2012.
  12. ^ Riedel, Bruce (2015). The Prince of Counterterrorism: Washington's favorite Saudi, Muhammad bin Nayef, is the scourge of al-Qaida and Iran but no friend of those who want to see major reforms in the kingdom. Brookings Institution Press. ISBN 9780815728665. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  13. ^ "Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz Al Saud". 21 November 2016. Retrieved 20 January 2019. He began his early study in the princes school in Riyadh
  14. ^ "King Salman Leads Funeral Prayers for Prince Turki". Asharq Al-awsat. 13 November 2016. Retrieved 20 January 2019. Born in 1934, Prince Turki studied at Princes’ School.
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Princes%27_School&oldid=879328922"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princes'_School
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Princes' School"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA