Portal:Women's sport

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The Women's Sport Portal
This is a sister portal of the Sport Portal and Feminism Portal

Introduction

Black and white picture of several women on roller skates coming around a curve in a roller derby track
Women's sports include amateur and professional competitions in virtually all sports. Female participation in sports rose dramatically in the twentieth century, especially in the last quarter, reflecting changes in modern societies that emphasized gender parity. Although the level of participation and performance still varies greatly by country and by sport, women's sports have broad acceptance throughout the world, and in a few instances, such as tennis and figure skating, rival or exceed their male counterparts in popularity.

Few women competed in sports until the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as social changes in Europe and North America favored increased female participation in society as equals with men. Although women were permitted to participate in many sports, relatively few showed interest, and there was often disapproval of those who did. The modern Olympics had female competitors from 1900 onward, though women at first participated in considerably fewer events than men. Concern over the physical strength and stamina of women led to the discouragement of female participation in more physically intensive sports, and in some cases led to less physically demanding female versions of male sports. Thus netball was developed out of basketball and softball out of baseball.

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Dire Tune (shown running at the Boston Marathon) led the Ethiopian women's challenge
The provisional favourite for the women's race was Kenyan runner Florence Kiplagat, who was the fastest entrant in the field through her win at the Lille Half Marathon in September (also her debut for the distance). Her compatriots Peninah Arusei and Sarah Chepchirchir – second and third in Lille – completed the strongest three of the Kenyan women's team, which was considered the team to beat for the title. The Ethiopians, led by Boston Marathon winner Dire Tune, were their main opposition for the team race, although the nation had sent relatively inexperienced runners to the championships on this occasion. China's leading athlete was Zhu Xiaolin, who despite being an established marathon runner had less experience over the half distance. Although Japan lacked a leading figure individually, their overall consistency (which had brought them team medals in the last five editions) demonstrated their team pedigree.

The beginning to the race highlighted the dominance of the Kenyan and Ethiopian runners as they set a high tempo from the outset. By the time the first 5 km marker was passed, Australia's Nikki Chapple was the only athlete left in the leading pack to come from outside of the two historically strong nations. A few kilometres later, she dropped back from the pack and at the 10 km mark five Ethiopians and four Kenyans had a fifteen second advantage on the rest of the field. As the race reached the midway point, the temperature began to increase and the heat and humidity reduced the pace of the runners. The conditions took their toll on some of the leaders in this section of the race. Chepchirchir slowed considerably while Meseret Mengistu, Joyce Chepkirui and Fate Tola were the next to gradually lose contact with the front runners. Kiplagat, Dire, Arusei and Feyse Tadese were the sole contenders remaining as the race headed towards the final stages, but Kiplagat and Dire soon left the other two trailing a few minutes later.

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The Women's Sports Foundation (WSF) "is an educational nonprofit (501(c)(3) charity) organization founded in 1974 by tennis legend Billie Jean King." Its stated mission statement is "To advance the lives of girls and women through sports and physical activity."

The foundation was established in 1974 by Billie Jean King, former husband Larry King and Jim Jorgensen, funded with a $5,000 check from Bob Hope that Billie Jean King had won as the Gillette Female Athlete of the Year. The WSF began its multi-sport emphasis at the 1975 ABC TV show “Women’s Superstars” which was held at the Houston Astrodome at which Olympic swimmer Donna de Varona and other women’s sports stars became interested.

From 1975 to 1990, under the direction of Executive Director, Eva Auchincloss, Deputy Director Holly Turner, and Chairwoman Billie Jean King, the Board of Trustees was expanded beyond Billie Jean, Larry King, Jim Jorgensen and Donna de Varona to include influential persons like Peggy Fleming, Snoopy creator Charles M. Schulz, and Bristol-Myers executive Marvin Koslo. In 1990, Life magazine named King one of the "100 Most Important Americans of the 20th Century," in part because of projects such as the Women's Sports Foundation.

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COLLECTIE TROPENMUSEUM Gymnastiekles aan de Koning Willem III-school te Weltevreden Batavia Java TMnr 10002315.jpg
Repronegatief. Gymnastiekles aan de Koning Willem III-school te Weltevreden, Batavia, Java.


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Alyssa Jean Healy (born 24 March 1990 on the Gold Coast, Queensland) is a cricketer who plays for New South Wales and the Australian women's team. She made her international debut in February 2010.

A right-handed batsman and wicket-keeper, she is the daughter of Greg Healy, who was part of the Queensland squad, while her uncle Ian Healy was Australia's Test wicket-keeper and held the world record for the most Test dismissals. Healy first came to prominence in late 2006 when she became the first girl to play among boys in the private schools' competition in New South Wales. She moved up the state age group ranks and made her debut for the senior New South Wales team in the 2007–08 season. She played most of her first two seasons as a specialist batsman due to the presence of Leonie Coleman—a wicket-keeper for Australia—in the state side. Coleman left New South Wales at the start of the 2009–10 season and Healy took up the glovework on a full-time basis for her state. During the same season, she recorded her highest score of 89 not out as faster than a run a ball, and made the most dismissals of any wicket-keeper in the Women's National Cricket League.

Following the injury to Australian captain and wicket-keeper Jodie Fields, Healy was given her international debut in the 2010 Rose Bowl series against New Zealand. She played in the first five One Day Internationals (ODIs) and five Twenty20 (T20) internationals, but was dropped for the last three ODIs during the New Zealand leg of the series. Healy played in every match of the 2010 World Twenty20 as Australia won the tournament after an unbeaten campaign.

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September 19

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