Portal:Women's association football

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Women's association football

Players during the qualifying round of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, October 31, 2013.

Women's association football (women's soccer) is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.

The history of women's football has seen major competitions being launched at both the national and international levels. Women's football has faced many struggles throughout its history. Although its first golden age occurred in the United Kingdom in the early 1920s, when one match achieved over 50,000 spectators, the Football Association initiated a ban in 1921 that disallowed women's football games from the grounds used by its member clubs. The ban stayed in effect until July 1971. The same year, UEFA recommended that the women's game should be taken under the control of the national associations in each country.

At the beginning of the 21st century, women's football, like men's football, has become professionalised and is growing in both popularity and participation. From the first known professional team in 1984, to the hundreds of thousands of tickets sold for the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup, support of women's professional football (soccer) has increased around the globe. However, as in other sports, women have struggled for pay and opportunities equal to male football players. Major league and international women's football enjoys far less television and media coverage than the men's equivalent. In spite of this, the popularity and participation in women's football continues to grow.

Selected article

The Saudi Arabia women's national football team would be the national team representing the kingdom in international football. However, the team does not yet exist because of influence of religious leaders in Saudi Arabia and systematic discrimination against women's sport, active opposition of political leaders and sport administrators. International pressure has come to bear on the country to field a women's team, and FIFA now allows the hijab to be worn in competition. A meeting at the College of Business Administration in Jeddah was seen as a possible first step in a team eventually being created.

Despite a lack of official support for a national team and women's football in general, women have self-organised their own teams and play games out of the sight of men. Created in 2006, King's United women football club was the first women's football club in the country. No official data is kept regarding participation rates for women football players.

Selected biography

Katie Chapman.jpg

Katie Sarah Chapman (born 15 June 1982) is an English footballer who plays for English club Arsenal Ladies in the FA WSL and is a former member of the England women's national team. She primarily plays as a central midfielder, although she has also been deployed in central defence while playing for England. Chapman is known for her strength, fierce tackling and heading ability. A mother of three, Chapman is described as "a physical player who handles a brunt of the dirty work in the middle of the pitch. She also can produce on the offensive end in a big game." Her playing ability, profile and influence have drawn comparisons to former England captain and fellow Londoner David Beckham.

Chapman is a former England U–18 captain. She made her senior international debut aged 17 in May 2000 in a 2001 UEFA Women's Championship qualification match against Switzerland. The following month, she made her first start against Norway. In March 2002 she netted her first senior international goal in a 4–1 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification win in the Netherlands. Chapman has represented England at four major international tournaments; UEFA Euro 2001, UEFA Euro 2005, 2007 FIFA World Cup and UEFA Euro 2009. A two–time winner of the FA International Player of the Year in 2002 and 2010, Chapman took a break from the national team in March 2011 with a total of 82 caps and eight goals. She remains available for England selection.

Selected league

The Frauen-Bundesliga (English: Women Federal League) is the main league competition for women's football (soccer) in Germany. In 1990 the German Football Association (DFB) created the German Women's Bundesliga, based on the model of the men's Bundesliga. It was first played with north and south divisions, but in 1997 the groups were merged to form a uniform league. The league currently consists of twelve teams and the seasons usually last from late summer to the end of spring with a break in the winter.

In the UEFA Women's Champions League, the Frauen-Bundesliga is the most successful league with a total of seven titles from four clubs, with 1. FFC Frankfurt winning the most titles of any club.

Selected picture

Australian national team forward Samantha Kerr playing against the United States in Carson, California, 2012

Australian national team forward Samantha Kerr playing against the United States in Carson, California, 2012

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Sydney Leroux in 2012

Rapinoe takes a corner kick in the gold medal match at the 2012 London Olympics


Selected national team

The Togo women's national football team is a FIFA-recognised team that represents Togo in international football competition. Togo have played five FIFA-recognised matches, all in 2006, and are currently unranked. They have not competed in major regional and international tournaments. While the country has under-17 and under-20 national sides, further development of the team and the sport in Togo faces challenges common to African countries, as well as country-specific problems such as the sport's lack of domestic popularity.

In the news

  • December 17: Wikinews interviews former Matilda's player Sarah Walsh about Australian women's soccer
  • December 7: Wikinews interviews academic Steve Redhead about Australian women's soccer
  • January 7: Abby Wambach wins FIFA World Player of the Year
  • November 19: Canberra United lose first game since January 2011
  • July 27: London Olympics organizers apologize after North Korea flag gaffe


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