Portal:Women's association football

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Women's association football

Players during the qualifying round of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, October 31, 2013.

Women's association football (women's soccer) is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.

The history of women's football has seen major competitions being launched at both the national and international levels. Women's football has faced many struggles throughout its history. Although its first golden age occurred in the United Kingdom in the early 1920s, when one match achieved over 50,000 spectators, the Football Association initiated a ban in 1921 that disallowed women's football games from the grounds used by its member clubs. The ban stayed in effect until July 1971. The same year, UEFA recommended that the women's game should be taken under the control of the national associations in each country.

At the beginning of the 21st century, women's football, like men's football, has become professionalised and is growing in both popularity and participation. From the first known professional team in 1984, to the hundreds of thousands of tickets sold for the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup, support of women's professional football (soccer) has increased around the globe. However, as in other sports, women have struggled for pay and opportunities equal to male football players. Major league and international women's football enjoys far less television and media coverage than the men's equivalent. In spite of this, the popularity and participation in women's football continues to grow.

Selected article

Qualifying countries

The 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup was the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It took place in Guangdong, China from 16 November to 30 November 1991. FIFA, football's international governing body selected China as host nation as Guangdong had hosted a prototype world championship three years earlier, the 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament. Matches were played in the state capital, Guangzhou, as well as in Foshan, Jiangmen and Zhongshan. The competition was sponsored by Mars, Incorporated. With FIFA still reluctant to bestow their "World Cup" brand, the tournament was officially known as the 1st FIFA World Championship for Women's Football for the M&M's Cup.

It was won by the United States, whose captain April Heinrichs formed a forward line dubbed the "triple–edged sword" with Carin Jennings and Michelle Akers-Stahl. Jennings was named player of the tournament while Akers-Stahl's ten goals won the Golden Shoe. The United States beat Norway 2–1 in the final in front of a crowd of 65,000 people at Guangzhou's Tianhe Stadium. Total attendance was 510,000, an average per match of 19,615. In the opening match at the same stadium, Norway had been defeated 4–0 by hosts China. Goalkeeper Zhong Honglian, of China, posted the first official "clean sheet" in the tournament.

Selected biography

Lloyd celebrates at the 2012 Summer Olympics after scoring a goal

Carli Lloyd (born July 16, 1982) is an American professional soccer midfielder who currently plays for Western New York Flash in the National Women's Soccer League and the United States women's national soccer team. She is a two-time Olympic gold medalist and scored the gold medal-winning goals in the finals of both the 2008 Summer Olympics and the 2012 Summer Olympics. She has represented the United States at two FIFA Women's World Cup tournaments: first at the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup in which she helped the U.S. win bronze and at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup in which the U.S. won silver. She has played in over 160 matches for the U.S. national team and scored over 45 goals.

Llloyd played professionally for the Chicago Red Stars, Sky Blue FC, and Atlanta Beat in Women's Professional Soccer (WPS). She was allocated to the Western New York Flash for the inaugural season of the National Women's Soccer League in 2013 helping the team win the regular season championship.

Selected league

The National Women's Soccer League (NWSL) is the top-level professional women's soccer league in the United States. It began play in spring 2013 with eight teams; four of them are former members of Women's Professional Soccer (WPS), which had been the top women's league in the United States soccer pyramid before its demise in 2012.

Selected picture

Marta (10), meio-campista, craque, genial, DSC00982.jpg
Marta Vieira da Silva waves to the crowd after a group stage match at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup between Brazil and Norway, 3 July 2011.

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Sydney Leroux in 2012

Rapinoe takes a corner kick in the gold medal match at the 2012 London Olympics


Selected national team

The Central African Republic women's national football team represents the Central African Republic (CAR) in women's international football competitions. The team played two games in 2004 and a match in 2006 against Senegal that was recognised by FIFA, football's international governing body. The team has not participated in the Women's World Cup, but the country's youth national team has played in several matches and events, including an Under-19 World Cup qualifying competition in which the team lost in the semi-finals. As is the case across Africa, the women's game faces numerous challenges. Football was only formally organised in 2000, and there are only 400 players competing at the national level.

In the news

  • December 17: Wikinews interviews former Matilda's player Sarah Walsh about Australian women's soccer
  • December 7: Wikinews interviews academic Steve Redhead about Australian women's soccer
  • January 7: Abby Wambach wins FIFA World Player of the Year
  • November 19: Canberra United lose first game since January 2011
  • July 27: London Olympics organizers apologize after North Korea flag gaffe


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