Portal:Women's association football

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Introduction

UEFA Women's Cup Final 2005 at Potsdam

Women's association football, also commonly known as women's football, or women's soccer, is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.

The history of women's football has seen major competitions being launched at both the national and international levels. Women's football has faced many struggles throughout its history. Although its first golden age occurred in the United Kingdom in the early 1920s, when one match achieved over 50,000 spectators, The Football Association initiated a ban in 1921 that disallowed women's football games from the grounds used by its member clubs. The ban stayed in effect until July 1971.

Selected article

Dick, Kerr's Ladies in 1921

Dick, Kerr's Ladies F.C. was one of the earliest known women's football (soccer) teams in England. The team remained in existence for over 48 years from 1917 to 1965 playing 828 games, winning 758, drawing 46, and losing 24. During its early years, matches attracted anywhere from 4,000 to over 50,000 spectators per match. In 1920, Dick, Kerr's Ladies defeated a French side 2-0 in front of 25,000 people that went down in history as the first women's international football (soccer) game. The team faced strong opposition by England's Football Association (FA) who banned the women from using fields and stadiums controlled by FA-affiliated clubs for 50 years (the rule was finally repealed in 1971).

Selected biography

Sinclair at the 2009 WPS All-Stars Game

Christine Sinclair (born June 12, 1983) is a Canadian professional soccer player for Portland Thorns FC and is captain of the Canadian national team. Sinclair is an Olympic bronze medalist and one of the most prolific scorers of all time.

Sinclair has spent 13 years with the national team, participating in three FIFA Women's World Cups (USA 2003, China 2007, Germany 2011) and two Olympic Football Tournaments (Beijing 2008, London 2012). She is an 11-time winner of the Canada Soccer Player of the Year award and has been honoured by FIFA as a nominee for World Player of the Year six times (2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010 and 2012). In 2012, Sinclair won both the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada’s athlete of the year and the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award as Canada's female athlete of the year. In September 2013, she was inducted into Canada's Walk of Fame.

Selected league

The National Women's Soccer League (NWSL) is the top-level professional women's soccer league in the United States. It began play in spring 2013 with eight teams; four of them are former members of Women's Professional Soccer (WPS), which had been the top women's league in the United States soccer pyramid before its demise in 2012.

Selected image

Australian national team forward Samantha Kerr playing against the United States in Carson, California, 2012

Australian national team forward Samantha Kerr playing against the United States in Carson, California, 2012

Did you know?

Sydney Leroux in 2012

Rapinoe takes a corner kick in the gold medal match at the 2012 London Olympics


Selected national team

German national team in 2012

The Germany women's national football team (German: Deutsche Fußballnationalmannschaft der Frauen) represents Germany in international women's association football and is directed by the German Football Association (DFB). Initially called "West Germany" in informal English, the team played its first international match in 1982. After German reunification in 1990, the DFB squad remained the national team of the Federal Republic of Germany.

The German national team is one of the most successful in women's football. They are two-time world champions, having won the 2003 and 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup. Germany is the only nation to have won both the men's and the women's World Cup. The team has won eight of the eleven UEFA European Championships, claiming the last six titles in a row. Germany has won three bronze medals at the Women's Olympic Football Tournament, finishing third in 2000, 2004 and 2008. Birgit Prinz holds the record for most appearances and is the team's all-time leading goalscorer. Prinz has also set international records; she has received the FIFA World Player of the Year award three times and is the joint overall top goalscorer at the Women's World Cup.

Women's football was long met with skepticism in Germany, and official matches were banned by the DFB until 1970. But the women's national team has grown in popularity since winning the World Cup in 2003, when it was also chosen as Germany's Sports Team of the Year. Silvia Neid has been the team's head coach since 2005, succeeding Tina Theune after nine years as her assistant. As of September 2013, Germany is ranked No. 2 in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

In the news

  • December 17: Wikinews interviews former Matilda's player Sarah Walsh about Australian women's soccer
  • December 7: Wikinews interviews academic Steve Redhead about Australian women's soccer
  • January 7: Abby Wambach wins FIFA World Player of the Year
  • November 19: Canberra United lose first game since January 2011
  • July 27: London Olympics organizers apologize after North Korea flag gaffe


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