Portal:Stamford

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Introduction

Stamford is a town on the River Welland in Lincolnshire, England, 92 miles (148 km) north of London on the A1. The population at the 2011 census was 19,701. The town has 17th and 18th-century stone buildings, older timber-framed buildings and five medieval parish churches. In 2013, Stamford was rated the best place to live in a survey done by The Sunday Times.

Selected article

Stamford railway station AB1.JPG
Stamford railway station serves the town of Stamford in Lincolnshire, England. The station is 12.5 miles (20 km) west of Peterborough on the (as built) Syston and Peterborough Railway, the line is now part of the much bigger Birmingham–Peterborough line. CrossCountry operate the majority of services as part of their Birmingham to Stansted Airport route. It is owned by Network Rail and operated by East Midlands Trains (EMT) train operating company (TOC).

The station was formerly known as Stamford Town to distinguish it from the now closed Stamford East station in Water Street.

The station building is a fine stone structure in Tudor style, influenced by the nearby Burghley House, and designed by Sancton Wood.[1]


In the news

  • Cameras put up to tackle anti-social behaviour in Collyweston. September 1, 2011. Rutland & Stamford Mercury.
  • Planners approve 120 homes of Market Deeping. September 1, 2011. Rutland & Stamford Mercury.
More news on Wikinews

Selected biography

Sir Harold Malcolm Watts Sargent (29 April 1895 – 3 October 1967) was an English conductor, organist and composer widely regarded as Britain's leading conductor of choral works. The musical ensembles with which he was associated included the Ballets Russes, the Royal Choral Society, the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, and the London Philharmonic, Hallé, Liverpool Philharmonic, BBC Symphony and Royal Philharmonic orchestras. Sargent was held in high esteem by choirs and instrumental soloists, but because of his high standards and a statement that he made in a 1936 interview about musicians' rights to tenure, his relationship with orchestral players was often uneasy. Despite this, he was co-founder of the London Philharmonic, was the first conductor of the Liverpool Philharmonic as a full-time ensemble, and played an important part in saving the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra from disbandment in the 1960s.


Selected image

High Street St Martin's, Stamford - geograph.org.uk - 76286.jpg
Credit: David Gruar

High Street St Martin's, Stamford. Stamford is noted for its coaching inns and its churches. This photo shows an example of each: the Bull & Swan and St Martin's. This street formed part of the Great North Road, which explains the presence of the inns.

Did you know...

...Stamford was the first conservation area to be designated in England and Wales under the Civic Amenities Act 1967?
Other "Did you know" facts...

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References

  1. ^ "National Monument Record for Stamford Station".

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