Portal:Serbia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Panoramic view of Belgrade and the confluence of the Sava River and the Danube


Selected article

In folklore, St. Elijah often replaces the pagan dragon as the ala’s main opponent.

An ala or hala (plural: ale) is a mythological creature recorded in the folklore of Bulgarians, Macedonians, and Serbs. Ale are considered demons of bad weather whose main purpose is to lead hail-producing thunderclouds in the direction of fields, vineyards, or orchards to destroy the crops, or loot and take them away. Extremely voracious, ale particularly like to eat children, though their gluttony is not limited to Earth. It is believed they can try to devour the Sun or the Moon causing eclipses; her success would mean the end of the world. When people encounter an ala, their mental or physical health, or even life, are in peril; however, her favor can be gained by approaching her with respect and trust. Being in a good relationship with an ala is very beneficial: she makes her favorites rich and saves their lives in times of trouble.

The appearance of ale is quite diversely and often vaguely described in folkloric sources. A given ala may look like a black wind, a gigantic creature of indistinct form, a huge-mouthed, humanlike, or snakelike monster, a female dragon, a raven, etc. By certain descriptions, ale can in fact assume various human or animal shapes, and can even possess a person’s body. This diversity is probably due to the fact that the ala is a synthesis of a Slavic demon of bad weather and a similar demon of the central Balkans pre-Slavic population. In folk tales with a humanlike ala, her personality is strikingly similar to that of the Russian Baba Yaga.


Serbia news

Wikinews Serbia portal
  • July 15: Djokovic withdraws from Wimbledon Championships
  • June 7: Djokovic wins French Open, completes his career Grand Slam
  • January 31: Djokovic beats Murray for fourth time, wins Aus Open 2016
  • January 28: 6-1, 6-2, 3-6 and 6-3: Djokovic beats Federer and advances to Aus Open 2016 Final
  • August 27: Austrian police find dozens dead inside lorry



Selected picture


Did you know

... that Lazar, a Serbian monk, built the first mechanical clock in Russia in 1404, one of the first in Europe, at the request of Vasily I of Moscow?

... that Jadarite, a new mineral discovered in Jadar in 2006, has almost the exact same chemical formula as Kryptonite?

... that a one-armed Russian military officer became a monk in Praskvica Monastery and built a 3-kilometre (1.9 mi) stone road from Sveti Stefan to the monastery?

... that, based on the research of historian Momčilo Spremić, it is possible that Vuk Branković really betrayed his Serbian allies during the Battle of Kosovo in 1389?

... that the medieval Church of the Holy Mother of God in Donja Kamenica, Serbia, features unusual towers on either side of the entrance?

... that Dragan Velić is the current President of the Union of Serbian Districts and District Units of Kosovo and Metohija of North Kosovo?


Web resources

Tourism

  • National Tourism Organisation of Serbia

Government

  • Government of Serbia
  • National Assembly of Serbia
  • The EU integration Office
  • People's Office of the President
  • National Bank of Serbia
  • Republic of Serbia Statistical Office

Business

  • Doing Business in Serbia
  • Serbian Chamber of Commerce
  • Serbia Investment and Export Promotion Agency

Energy

  • Serbia Energy Business

Other

  • Project Rastko
  • Serbian Heraldry Society
  • Serbian Genealogy Society
  • RTS - Radio Television of Serbia


WikiProjects


Demographics

Population statistics of Serbia (2011 census)
  • Serbia 7,186,862
    • Belgrade region 1,659,440
    • Vojvodina region 1,931,809
    • Šumadija and West Serbia region 2,031,697
    • South and East Serbia region 1,563,916
    • Kosovo and Metohija n/a


Things you can do

  • writing new articles and identifying those needing creation
  • improving articles and identifying those needing improvement
  • undertaking project maintenance – help adding project templates to article and category talk pages – see templates page
    • identifying relevant articles and add {{WikiProject Serbia}} to their talk page.
    • assessing articles for quality and assessment standards – see the assessment page.
    • assessing and recommending resources (online and print) – see the resources page.
  • contributing to the Serbia portal – see the Serbia portal
  • communicating with project members – at the project talk page
  • add missing images – see also Category:Wikipedia requested photographs in Serbia
  • inviting potential members – add {{WPSRB Invite}} to their talk pages.


Selected biography

Petar II Petrović-Njegoš

Petar II Petrović-Njegoš (Serbian Cyrillic: Петар II Петровић-Његош) was a Serbian Orthodox Prince-Bishop (Serbian: Владика or Vladika) of Montenegro and a ruler who transformed Montenegro from a theocracy into a secular state. However, he is most famous as a poet and is considered by many to be among the greatest poets of the Serbian language. The first notable writer from Montenegro, his notable works include The Mountain Wreath (Serbian: Горски вијенац or Gorski vijenac), the Light of Microcosm (Луча микрокозма or Luča mikrokozma), the Serbian Mirror (Огледало српско or Ogledalo srpsko), and False Tsar Stephen the Little (Лажни цар Шћепан Мали or Lažni car Šćepan Mali).

Njegoš spent his early years in Njeguši. In 1825, when his uncle Prince-Bishop Peter I sent him to the monastery of Cetinje as his successor to be tutored by a monk, Misail Cvetković and the Prince-Bishop's secretary, Jakoov Cek. He wrote his first poems there, which he used to entertain the local chiefs and monks. The most famous of them were satirical. In the middle of the year, Radivoje was dispatched to the Topla monastery near Herceg Novi, where he was taught Italian, mathematics, ecclesiastical singing, the Psalter and another subject at the monastery's hieromonk, Josip Tropović. He often attended the ecclesiastical services in the nearby Savina monastery, dedicated to Saint Sava.


Serbian people

Politicians

Category:Serbian politicians

Saints

Category:Serbian saints

Scientists & Inventors

Category:Serbian scientists

Athletes

Category:Serbian sportspeople

Artists

Connected to Serbs or Serbia


Serbian Cities


Largest cities of Serbia (2011 census)

Belgrade - 1,731,425
Novi Sad - 335,701
Niš - 257,867
Priština- 198,000
Prizren - 178,000
Kragujevac - 177,468
Leskovac - 143,962
Subotica - 140,358
Kruševac - 127,429
Kraljevo - 124,554
Zrenjanin - 122,714
Pančevo - 122,252
Šabac - 115,347
Čačak - 114,809
Uroševac - 108,000
Smederevo - 107,528
Sombor - 97,263
Valjevo - 95,631
Peć -95,000


Major categories


Major topics

Nuvola apps clock.png History

Crystal Clear app package network.png Geography

Nuvola apps knewsticker.png Politics

Crystal Clear app kcoloredit.png Culture

Nuvola devices blockdevice.png Economy


Related portals


Associated Wikimedia

The following Wikimedia Foundation sister projects provide more on this subject:

Wikibooks
Books

Commons
Media

Wikinews 
News

Wikiquote 
Quotations

Wikisource 
Texts

Wikiversity
Learning resources

Wikivoyage 
Travel guides

Wiktionary 
Definitions

Wikidata 
Database

Wikispecies 
Species

Purge server cache

Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Portal:Serbia&oldid=697584592"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Serbia
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Portal:Serbia"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA