Portal:Saskatchewan

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Saskatchewan: Saskatchewan and Alberta, the twin provinces were both formed (1 Sept., 1905), by an Act of the Dominion Parliament, which gave them an identical constitution. Saskatchewan derives its name from the important river, Kissiskatchiwan, or Swift Current, now better known under the abbreviation of Saskatchewan, whose two branches drain it from west to east.

Saskatchewan was made up of the unorganized districts of Assiniboia, Saskatchewan, and Eastern Athabasca. The southern and northern boundaries (49 deg. and 60 deg. N. lat.). Saskatchewan lies between 102 deg. and 110 deg. W. long. The greatest length is 760 miles. Saskatchewan is 393 miles wide in the south, and 277 in the north, thus forming an immense quadrangle of 250,650 sq. miles, of which 8318 are water.

Saskatchewan may be described as a vast plain, quite treeless in the south, with an average elevation of 1500 feet above the sea-level. Its northernmost part is considerably lower, since Lake Athabasca, in the extreme north-east is only 690 feet above sea-level. The climate is exceedingly healthful, though the cold is at times intense on the treeless prairies of Saskatchewan. This immense region is traversed by the River Saskatchewan which has its source in the Rocky Mountains, and after winding its way for some 1200 miles, empties into Lake Winnipeg. There is also in the Province of Saskatchewan proper the Beaver River which, after passing through a long chain of more or less important lakes, becomes the Churchill, and pursues its course in an easterly direction until it empties itself into Hudson Bay, at the trading post of the same name. Saskatchewan counts such bodies of water as Cree Lake, 407 square miles; Wollaston Lake, 906 square miles; Reindeer or Caribou Lake, 2437 square miles, and a host of smaller ones, which lie mostly in the north. There are in either province few mountains, none of which are important.

Saskatchewan is par excellence the wheat-growing region of Canada. Its plains are famous for their fertility. They extend from the international boundary, practically to Prince Albert, 53 deg. 15 min. N. lat., where the northern forest, which itself contains important stretches of agricultural land, commences. Adapted from Catholic Encyclopedia (1913) (Saskatchewan and Alberta)

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The geography of Saskatchewan (suskăch'uwun, –wän", săs"–), province (2001 pop. 978,933), 251,700 sq mi (651,900 km²), describes the land formations and physical features of this prairie province in western Canada. The various geographical branches provide an analysis of natural and human area studies. The changes of either the natural or human in an area will force an adaptation of evolution in relation to the various ecozones and terrain features. The physical land area is described by political boundaries which have changed through history. Cultural and technological changes have affected the adaptation of the human lifestyle with the regional environmental area throughout the history of Saskatchewan.


For more information: Geography of Saskatchewan

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Louis Riel
Louis Riel (October 22, 1844 – November 16, 1885) was a Canadian politician, a founder of the province of Manitoba, and leader of the Métis people of the Canadian prairies. He led two resistance movements against the Canadian government that sought to preserve Métis rights and culture as their homelands in the Northwest came progressively under the Canadian sphere of influence.

The first such resistance was the Red River Rebellion of 1869–1870. The provisional government established by Riel ultimately negotiated the terms under which the modern province of Manitoba entered the Canadian Confederation. Riel was forced into exile in the United States as a result of the controversial execution of Thomas Scott during the rebellion. Despite this, he is frequently referred to as the "Father of Manitoba." While a fugitive, he was elected three times to the Canadian House of Commons, although he never assumed his seat. During these years, he was frustrated by having to remain in exile despite his growing belief that he was a divinely chosen leader and prophet, a belief which would later resurface and influence his actions. He married in 1881 while in exile in Montana, and fathered three children. He became a naturalized American citizen and was actively involved in the Republican party.

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Adlai Stevenson
"Saskatchewan is much like Texas - except it's more friendly to the United States."

Source: Adlai E. Stevenson Quotes

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Junction of Highways 2 and 11

Junction of Highway 11 and Highway 2 on a nice summer day.

Photo credit: SriMesh

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South Saskatchewan River

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[[Image:|100px|Downtown Moose Jaw]]





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