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Portal:New York City

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The New York City Portal

The Flag of New York City
The location of New York City within New York State

New York City is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York metropolitan area, one of the most populous urban agglomerations in the world. A global power city, New York exerts a significant impact upon commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and entertainment. The home of the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy, and has been described as the cultural capital of the world.

Founded as a trading post by colonists of the Dutch Republic in 1626, the city and its surroundings came under English control in 1664 and were renamed New York after King Charles II of England granted the lands to his brother, the Duke of York. New York served as the capital of the United States from 1785 until 1790. It has been the country's largest city since 1790. New York City consists of five boroughs, each of which is a county of New York State. The five boroughs—The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island—were consolidated into a single city in 1898. With a census-estimated 2012 population of 8,336,697 distributed over a land area of just 302.64 square miles (783.8 km2), New York is the most densely populated major city in the United States. The New York metropolitan area's population of approximately 19.8 million people remains by a significant margin the United States' largest Metropolitan Statistical Area. As many as 800 languages are spoken in New York, making it the most linguistically diverse city in the world.

Many districts and landmarks in New York City have become well known to its approximately 55 million annual visitors. Several sources have ranked New York the most photographed city in the world. Times Square, iconified as "The Crossroads of the World", is the brightly illuminated hub of the Broadway theatre district, one of the world's busiest pedestrian intersections, and a major center of the world's entertainment industry. The names of many of the city's bridges, skyscrapers, and parks are known around the world. New York City's financial district, anchored by Wall Street in Lower Manhattan, has been called the world's leading financial center and is home to the New York Stock Exchange, the world's largest stock exchange by total market capitalization of its listed companies. The Statue of Liberty greeted millions of immigrants as they came to America by ship in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and is a globally recognized symbol of the United States and its democracy. Manhattan's Chinatown incorporates the highest concentration of Chinese people in the Western Hemisphere. Providing continuous 24/7 service, the New York City Subway is one of the most extensive rapid transit systems worldwide. Numerous colleges and universities in New York City, including Columbia University, New York University, and Rockefeller University, have been ranked among the top 35 in the world.

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The Alma Mater statue
Columbia University in the City of New York, commonly referred to as Columbia University, is an American private Ivy League research university located in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Upper Manhattan in New York City. It is the oldest institution of higher learning in the State of New York, the fifth oldest in the United States, and one of the country's nine Colonial Colleges founded before the American Revolution. Today the university operates Columbia Global Centers overseas in Amman, Beijing, Istanbul, Paris, Mumbai, Rio de Janeiro, Santiago and Nairobi.

The university was founded in 1754 as King's College by royal charter of George II of Great Britain. It briefly became a state entity, and was renamed Columbia College in 1784. A 1787 charter placed the institution under a private board of trustees. In 1896, the university was renamed Columbia University, and its campus was moved from Madison Avenue to its current location in Morningside Heights, where it occupies more than six city blocks, or 32 acres (13 ha). The university encompasses twenty schools and is affiliated with numerous institutions, including Teachers College, Barnard College, and the Union Theological Seminary, with joint undergraduate programs available through the Jewish Theological Seminary of America as well as the Juilliard School.

Columbia annually administers the Pulitzer Prize. 102 Nobel Prize laureates have been affiliated with the university as students, faculty, or staff. Columbia is second in the world only to Harvard in the number of Nobel Prize winner affiliates. Columbia is one of the fourteen founding members of the Association of American Universities, and was the first school in the United States to grant the M.D. degree. Notable alumni include five Founding Fathers of the United States; nine Justices of the United States Supreme Court; 20 living billionaires; 26 Academy Award winners; and 29 heads of state, including three United States Presidents.

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Staten Island Ferry terminal
Credit: Daniel Schwen

A view of the Staten Island Ferry terminal in Lower Manhattan. Operated by the New York City Department of Transportation, the ferry transports people between the boroughs of Manhattan and Staten Island, traving across the Upper New York Bay.

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Beverly Sills in 1956
Beverly Sills (May 25, 1929 – July 2, 2007) was an American operatic soprano who enjoyed success in the 1960s and 1970s. She was famous for her performances in coloratura soprano roles in operas around the world and on recordings. After retiring from singing in 1980, she became the general manager of the New York City Opera. In 1994, she became the Chairman of Lincoln Center and then, in 2002, of the Metropolitan Opera, stepping down in 2005. Sills lent her celebrity to further her charity work for the prevention and treatment of birth defects.

Sills was born Belle Miriam Silverman in Brooklyn, New York to Shirley Bahn (née Sonia Markovna), a musician, and Morris Silverman, an insurance broker. Her parents were Jewish immigrants from Odessa and Bucharest, Romania. She was raised in Brooklyn, where she was known, among friends, as "Bubbles" Silverman. As a child, she spoke Yiddish, Russian, Romanian, French and English. She attended Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn, as well as Manhattan's Professional Children's School.

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Johan Santana, the 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2012 Opening Day starting pitcher for the New York Mets
The New York Mets are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Flushing, Queens, in New York City. They play in the National League East division. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starting pitcher is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The New York Mets have used 20 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 50 seasons. The 20 starters have a combined Opening Day record of 26 wins, 12 losses (26–12) and 12 no decisions. No decisions are only awarded to the starting pitcher if the game is won or lost after the starting pitcher has left the game.

Tom Seaver holds the Mets' record for most Opening Day starts with 11, and has an Opening Day record of 6–0. He also has the most starts in Shea Stadium, the Mets' home ballpark from 1964 through 2008. Seaver and Dwight Gooden hold the Mets' record for most Opening Day wins with six each. Al Jackson and Roger Craig share the worst winning percentage as the Opening Day starting pitcher with a record of 0–2.

From 1968 through 1983, Mets' Opening Day starting pitchers went 16 consecutive years without a loss. During this period, Tom Seaver won six starts with five no decisions, Craig Swan won two starts, and Jerry Koosman, Pat Zachry and Randy Jones won one start apiece. Furthermore, in the 31-year period from 1968 through 1998, Mets' Opening Day starting pitchers only lost two games. During that period, they won 19 games with 10 no decisions. The only losses during this period were by Mike Torrez in 1984 and by Dwight Gooden in 1990.

Overall, Mets Opening Day starting pitchers have a record of 0–1 at the Polo Grounds, a 13–5 record with four no decisions at Shea Stadium and a 1–0 record at Citi Field. In addition, although the Mets were nominally the home team in 2000, the game was played in Tokyo Dome in Tokyo, Japan. Mike Hampton started the game in Tokyo and lost, making the Mets' Opening Day starting pitchers' combined home record 14–7, and their away record 12–5. The Mets went on to play in the World Series in 1969, 1973, 1986 and 2000, and won the 1969 and 1986 World Series championship games. Tom Seaver (1969 and 1973), Dwight Gooden (1986) and Mike Hampton (2000) were the Opening Day starting pitchers when the Mets played in the World Series, and they had a combined Opening Day record of 2–1.

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History New AmsterdamCommissioners' PlanBritish occupation of New YorkEllis IslandSeptember 11, 20011993 World Trade Center bombing1939 New York World's Fair1964 New York World's FairDraft rotsBlackout of 1977Crown Heights riotTammany HallBig AppleNYC transportationNYC Subway
Geography ManhattanThe BronxBrooklynStaten IslandQueensNew York HarborHudson RiverEast RiverUpper New York BayNew York BayLower ManhattanMidtown ManhattanUpper ManhattanLong Island SoundBronx KillThe NarrowsNewark BayJamaica Bay
Buildings Empire State BuildingChrysler BuildingWorld Trade CenterGrand Central TerminalMadison Square GardenYankee StadiumCiti FieldTimes SquareSouth Street SeaportStatue of LibertyHeadquarters of the United NationsSt. Patrick's CathedralRadio City Music HallOne World Trade CenterRockefeller CenterCathedral of St. John the DivineLever HouseCarnegie HallGracie MansionCity HallPlaza HotelMacy'sPenn StationCondé Nast BuildingCitigroup CenterMetLife BuildingWoolworth BuildingTrump TowerFlatiron Building30 Rockefeller Plaza28 Liberty StreetGoldman Sachs BuildingWaldorf Astoria New York
Transport New York City SubwayIRTBMTINDStaten Island FerryNYC FerryYellow taxisGreen taxisAirTrain JFKAirTrain NewarkJFK AirportLaGuardia AirportNewark Liberty International AirportPort AuthorityNJ TransitMTAStaten Island RailwayPATHTriborough BridgeBrooklyn–Battery TunnelQueens–Midtown TunnelBronx–Whitestone BridgeThrogs Neck BridgeHolland TunnelLincoln TunnelGeorge Washington BridgeWilliamsburg BridgeManhattan BridgeBrooklyn BridgePulaski SkywayTeterboro AirportNew Jersey Turnpike
Economy New York Stock ExchangeWall StreetPort Newark–ElizabethNASDAQNYSE AmericanNew York Mercantile ExchangeNew York Board of TradeMadison AvenueFifth Avenue
Education New York UniversityColumbia UniversityCUNYCooper UnionFITFordham UniversityThe New SchoolJuilliardPace UniversityPratt InstituteSVAManhattan CollegeSt. John's University
Civic MayorNYPDFDNYNYCEMCity CouncilCivil CourtCriminal CourtSupreme CourtAppellate DivisionTransit AuthorityTransit PoliceHighway PatrolAuxiliary PoliceDepartment of Parks and Recreation
Culture Macy's Thanksgiving Day ParadeMetsYankeesMuseum MileThe CloistersWhitney MuseumMetropolitan Museum of ArtInternational Center of PhotographyNew York Public LibraryQueens Public LibraryBrooklyn Public LibraryLincoln CenterNew York Hall of Science
Parks and grounds Central ParkBronx ZooNew York Botanical GardenConey IslandFlushing MeadowsBattery ParkProspect ParkRiverside ParkPelham Bay ParkGreenbeltHighbridge ParkBowling GreenHigh LineLiberty StateInwood Hill Park
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